Search Results

You are looking at 11 - 19 of 19 items for

  • Author or Editor: Prasad Vannemreddy x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Brian Willis, Vijayakumar Javalkar, Prasad Vannemreddy, Gloria Caldito, Junko Matsuyama, Bharat Guthikonda, Papireddy Bollam and Anil Nanda

Object

The aim of the study was to analyze the outcome of surgical treatment for posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus in premature infants.

Methods

From 1990 to 2006, 32 premature infants underwent surgical treatment for posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus, and their charts were retrospectively reviewed to analyze the complications and outcome with respect to shunt revisions. Multivariate analysis and time series were used to identify factors that influence the outcome in terms of shunt revisions.

Results

The mean gestational age was 27 ± 3.3 weeks, and mean birth weight was 1192 ± 660 g. Temporary reservoir placement was performed in 15 patients, while 17 underwent permanent CSF diversion with a ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt. In 2 patients, reservoir tapping alone was sufficient to halt the progression of hydrocephalus; 29 patients received VP shunts. The mean follow-up period was 37.3 months. The neonates who received VP shunts first were significantly older (p = 0.02) and heavier (p = 0.04) than those who initially underwent reservoir placement. Shunts were revised in 14 patients; 42% of patients in the reservoir group had their shunts revised, while 53% of infants who had initially received a VP shunt required a revision. The revision rate per patient in the reservoir group was half that in the direct VP shunt group (p = 0.027). No patient in the reservoir group had > 2 revisions. Shunt infections developed in 3 patients (10.3%), and 2 patients in the reservoir group died of nonneurological issues related to prematurity.

Conclusions

Birth weight and age are useful parameters in decision making. Preterm neonates with low birth weights benefit from initial CSF drainage procedures followed by permanent CSF diversion with respect to the number of shunt revisions.

Restricted access

Christina Notarianni, Prasad Vannemreddy, Gloria Caldito, Papireddy Bollam, Esther Wylen, Brian Willis and Anil Nanda

Object

Hydrocephalus is a notorious neurosurgical disease that carries the adage “once a shunt always a shunt.” This study was conducted to review the treatment results of pediatric hydrocephalus.

Methods

Pediatric patients who underwent ventriculoperitoneal shunt surgery over the past 14 years were reviewed for shunt revisions. Variables studied included age at shunt placement, revision, or replacement; programmable shunts; infection; obstruction; and diagnosis (congenital, posthemorrhagic, craniospinal dysraphism, and others including trauma, tumors, and infection). Multiple regression analysis methods were used to determine independent risk factors for shunt failure and the number of shunt revisions. The Kaplan-Meier method of survival analysis was used to compare etiologies on the 5-year survival (revision-free) rate and the median 5-year survival time.

Results

A total of 253 patients were studied with an almost equal sex distribution. There were 92 patients with congenital hydrocephalus, 69 with posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus, 48 with craniospinal dysraphism, and 44 with other causes. Programmable shunts were used in 73 patients (other types of shunts were used in 180 patients). A total of 197 patients (78%) underwent revision surgeries due to shunt failures. The mortality rate was 1.6%. Age at first revision, the 5-year survival rate, and the median 5-year survival time were significantly less for both posthemorrhagic and craniospinal dysraphism than for either the congenital or “other” group (p < 0.05). The failure rate and number of revisions were not significantly reduced with programmable shunts compared with either pressure-controlled or no-valve shunts (p > 0.5).

Conclusions

Posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus and craniospinal dysraphism hydrocephalus had significantly earlier revisions than congenital and other etiologies. Programmable systems did not reduce the failure rate or the average number of shunts revisions.

Full access

Prasad Vannemreddy, Christina Notarianni, Krishna Yanamandra, Dawn Napper and Joseph Bocchini Jr

Object

Studies have shown decreased levels of nitric oxide (NO), the product of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) gene activity, in infants with respiratory conditions and intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH). The authors evaluated the association of the eNOS gene promoter polymorphism T-786C with the cause of these conditions (respiratory conditions and IVH) in premature infants.

Methods

Blood samples from 124 African American premature infants were studied. The DNA was isolated and microplate polymerase chain reaction–restriction fragment length polymorphism assay was performed. Genotypes were scored as: TT homozygotes with 140 bp and 40 bp; CC homozygotes with 90 bp, 50 bp, and 40 bp; and TC heterozygotes with 140 bp, 90 bp, 50 bp, and 40 bp. Genotypes were stratified according to ethnicity, preterm status, and prematurity conditions.

Results

The mutant allele -786C was present in 15.3% of premature infants with respiratory distress syndrome, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, and IVH, compared with 7.25% in those premature infants without these conditions. A significant 2-fold increase of the mutant allele in patients compared with controls (p = 0.04, OR 2.3) reveals that the eNOS -786C allele could be a significant risk factor in the origin of respiratory conditions and IVH in premature infants.

Conclusions

These results suggest that the mutant eNOS -786C allele is a significant risk factor in the origin of respiratory and IVH diseases, probably mediating an insufficient supply of endogenous NO in premature infants.

Restricted access

Ali Nourbakhsh, Shashikant Patil, Prasad Vannemreddy, Alan Ogden, Debi Mukherjee and Anil Nanda

Object

Anterior screw fixation of the Type II odontoid fracture stabilizes the odontoid without restricting the motion of the cervical spine. The metal screw may limit bone remodeling because of stress shielding (if not placed properly) and limit imaging of the fracture. The use of bioabsorbable screws can overcome such shortcomings of the metal screws. The purpose of this study was to compare the strength of a 5-mm bioabsorbable screw with single 4-mm metal and double 3.5-mm lag screw fixation for Type II fractures of the odontoid process.

Methods

Three different modalities of anterior screw fixation were used in 19 C-2 vertebrae. These fixation methods consisted of a single 5-mm cannulated bioabsorbable lag screw (Group A), a single 4-mm cannulated titanium lag screw (Group B), and two 3.5-mm cannulated titanium lag screws (Group C). Anteroposterior (AP) stiffness and rotational stiffness were evaluated in all constructs.

Results

There was no statistical difference among the ages of the cadavers in each group (p = 0.52). The AP bending stiffness in Groups A, B, and C was 117 ± 86, 66 ± 43, and 305 ± 130 Nm/mm, respectively. The AP bending stiffness in Group C was significantly higher than that in Groups A and B (p = 0.01 and p = 0.001, respectively). The difference in AP bending stiffness values of bioabsorbable and 4-mm metal screws was not statistically significant (p = 0.23). The rotational stiffness of the double 3.5-mm metal screws was significantly greater than that of the 5-mm bioabsorbable and the 4-mm titanium screws.

Conclusions

Double screw fixation with 3.5-mm screws provides the stiffest construct in Type II odontoid fractures. Bioabsorbable lag screws (5 mm) have the same AP bending and rotational stiffness as the single titanium lag screw (4 mm) in odontoid fractures.

Restricted access

Nima Majlesi, Howard Greller and Mark Su

Restricted access

Ali Nourbakhsh, Jinping Yang, Sean Gallagher, Anil Nanda, Prasad Vannemreddy and Kim J. Garges

Object

The purpose of this study was to find a landmark according to which the surgeon can dissect the cervical spine safely, with the lowest possibility of damaging the vertebral artery (VA) during anterior approaches to the cervical spine or the VA.

Methods

The “safe zone” for each level of the cervical spine was described as an area where the surgeon can start from the midline in that zone and dissect the soft tissue laterally to end up on the transverse process and cross the VA while still on the transverse process. In other words, safe zone signifies the narrowest width of the transverse process at each level. In such an approach, the VA is protected from the inadvertent deep penetration of the instruments by the transverse process. The surgical safe zone for each level was the common area among at least 95% of the safe zones for that level. For the purpose of defining the upper and lower borders of the safe zone for each level, the line passing from the upper vertebral border perpendicular to the midline (upper vertebral border line) was used as a reference.

Cervical spines of 64 formalin-fixed cadavers were dissected. The soft tissue in front of the transverse process and intertransverse space was removed. Digital pictures of the specimens were taken before and after removal of the transverse processes, and the distance to the upper and lower border of the safe zone from the upper vertebral border line was measured on the digital pictures with Image J software. The VA diameter and distance from the midline at each level were also measured. To compare the means, the authors used t-test and ANOVA.

Results

The surgical safe zone lies between 1 mm above and 1 mm below the upper vertebral border at the fourth vertebra, 2 mm above and 1 mm below the upper vertebral border at the fifth vertebra, and 1 mm above and 2 mm below the upper vertebral border of the sixth vertebra. The VA was observed to be tortuous in 13% of the intertransverse spaces. There is a positive association between disc degeneration and tortuosity of the VA at each level (p < 0.001). The artery becomes closer to the midline (p < 0.001) and moves posteriorly during its ascent.

Conclusions

Dissection of the soft tissue off the bone along the surgical safe zone and removal of the transverse process afterward can be a practical and safe approach to avoid artery lacerations. The findings in the present study can be used in anterior approaches to the cervical spine, especially when the tortuosity of the artery mandates exposure of the VA prior to uncinate process resection, tumor excision, or VA repair.

Restricted access

Prasad S. S. V. Vannemreddy, Marjorie Fowler, Richard S. Polin, John R. Todd and Anil Nanda

✓ Malignant glioma is the most common primary brain neoplasm, but generally it is not included in the differential diagnosis of enhancing lesions of the central nervous system (CNS) in patients suffering from acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. We report a case of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) in a 29-year-old man with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Primary CNS lymphoma was suspected, making a definitive histological diagnosis crucial. An initial stereotactic biopsy sample was insufficient to establish a diagnosis and a second biopsy of the lesion was obtained. The histopathological investigation confirmed GBM and adjuvant external radiation treatment was given to the patient, who survived for 4 months after the initial biopsy. A decline in the rate of Toxoplasma infection and the changing diseases observed in HIV infection indicate the importance of obtaining a biopsy in cases of CNS mass lesions.

Restricted access

Roy A. E. Bakay and Prasad S. S. V. Vannemreddy