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  • Author or Editor: Neil A. Feldstein x
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R. Michael Scott

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Benjamin C. Kennedy, Michael B. Cloney, Richard C. E. Anderson and Neil A. Feldstein

OBJECT

Choroid plexus papillomas (CPPs) are rare neoplasms, often found in the atrium of the lateral ventricle of infants, and cause overproduction hydrocephalus. The extensive vascularity and medially located blood supply of these tumors, coupled with the young age of the patients, can make prevention of blood loss challenging. Preoperative embolization has been advocated to reduce blood loss and prevent the need for transfusion, but this mandates radiation exposure and the additional risks of vessel injury and stroke. For these reasons, the authors present their experience using the superior parietal lobule approach to CPPs of the atrium without adjunct therapy.

METHODS

A retrospective review was conducted of all children who presented to Columbia University/Morgan Stanley Children's Hospital of New York with a CPP in the atrium of the lateral ventricle and who underwent surgery using a superior parietal lobule approach without preoperative embolization.

RESULTS

Nine children were included, with a median age of 7 months. There were no perioperative complications or new neurological deficits. All patients had intraoperative blood loss of less than 100 ml, with a mean minimum hematocrit of 26.9% (range 19.6%–36.2%). No patients required a blood transfusion. The median follow-up was 39 months, during which time no patient demonstrated residual or recurrent tumor on MRI, nor did any have an increase in ventricular size or require CSF diversion.

CONCLUSIONS

The superior parietal lobule approach is safe and effective for very young children with CPPs in the atrium of the lateral ventricle. The results suggest that preoperative embolization is not essential to avoid transfusion or achieve overall good outcomes in these patients. This management strategy avoids radiation exposure and the additional risks associated with embolization.

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Todd C. Hankinson, J Mocco, Brent Kimball, Richard C. E. Anderson and Neil A. Feldstein

✓The authors describe the internal cranial expansion (ICE) procedure, a surgical technique that was used to treat two chronically shunt-treated children who presented with medically and surgically refractory intracranial hypertension despite the presence of functioning cerebrospinal fluid shunt systems. The ICE procedure was used as a means to increase intracranial volume without sacrificing calvarial rigidity. Intracranial volume was increased by 5% in one case and 10% in the other. Both patients have returned to their neurological and functional baselines, and they are free of symptoms related to intracranial hypertension.

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Richard C. E. Anderson, Ronald G. Emerson, Kathryn C. Dowling and Neil A. Feldstein

Object. The optimal treatment for patients with symptoms related to Chiari I malformation remains controversial. Although a suboccipital decompression with duraplasty is most commonly performed, there may be a subset of patients who improve in response to bone decompression alone. In an initial attempt to identify such patients, we performed a continuous study of intraoperative brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEPs) in patients undergoing a standard decompression with duraplasty and compared conduction times at three different time points: 1) baseline while the patient is supine (before positioning); 2) immediately after opening of the bone and release of the atlantooccipital membrane (that is, the dural band); and 3) after opening of the dura mater.

Methods. Eleven children and young adults (mean age 9.8 years) with symptoms related to Chiari I malformation underwent suboccipital decompression and duraplasty with intraoperative monitoring of BAEPs and somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs). Six patients (55%) had associated syringomyelia.

At baseline, the I to V interpeak latency (IPL) for both sides (total 21 BAEPs) was 4.19 ± 0.22 msec (mean ± standard deviation). After complete bone decompression and before the dura mater was opened, the I to V IPL decreased to 4.03 ± 0.25 msec (p = 0.0005). When the dura was opened, however, no further decrease in the I to V IPL was detected (4.03 ± 0.25 msec; p = 0.6). The SSEPs remained stable throughout the procedure.

Conclusions. In children and young adults undergoing suboccipital decompression with duraplasty for Chiari I malformation, the vast majority of improvement in conduction through the brainstem occurs after bone decompression and division of the atlantooccipital membrane, rather than after opening of the dura. Additional studies are needed to establish whether the improvement seen with BAEP monitoring during bone decompression will predict long-term clinical improvement in these patients.

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Birce Dilge Taskin, Kurenai Tanji, Neil A. Feldstein, Maureen McSwiggan-Hardin and Cigdem I. Akman

Herpes simplex virus (HSV) encephalitis can manifest with different clinical presentations, including acute monophasic illness and biphasic chronic granulomatous HSV encephalitis. Chronic encephalitis is much less common, and very rare late relapses are associated with intractable epilepsy and progressive neurological deficits with or without evidence of HSV in the cerebrospinal fluid. The authors report on an 8-year-old girl with a history of treated HSV-1 encephalitis when she was 13 months of age and focal epilepsy when she was 2 years old. Although free of clinical seizures, when she was 5, she experienced behavioral and academic dysfunction, which was later attributed to electrographic focal seizures and worsening electroencephalography (EEG) findings with electrical status epilepticus during slow-wave sleep (ESES). Following a right temporal lobectomy, chronic granulomatous encephalitis was diagnosed. The patient's clinical course improved with the resolution of seizures and EEG abnormalities.

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Patrick B. Senatus, Shearwood McClelland III, Kurenai Tanji, Alexander Khandji, Judy Huang and Neil Feldstein

P Cerebellar glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a rare entity in adults and an extremely rare entity in children. Approximately 30 cases have been reported in the literature. The authors report the case of a histologically confirmed cerebellar GBM presenting initially as supra- and infratentorial gliomatosis cerebri. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis had been diagnosed in the patient and that diagnosis remained until near the end of his treatment. This case underscores the need for recognizing the clinical presentation of gliomatosis cerebri and multifocal GBM in the pediatric subpopulation thought to harbor demyelinating disease.

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Ricardo J. Komotar, J Mocco, Jess E. Jones, Brad E. Zacharia, Tarik Tihan, Neil A. Feldstein and Richard C. E. Anderson

Pilomyxoid astrocytoma (PMA) is a recently defined pediatric brain tumor; PMAs were previously classified within the pilocytic astrocytoma (PA) category. Nevertheless, PMA has different histological features and has been shown to behave more aggressively than PA. These findings indicate that PMA may be a unique entity that is distinct from PA, or it may be an unusual variant. To increase awareness of PMA within the neurosurgical community, the authors review the diagnostic criteria, prognostic implications, and current management of this recently described pediatric low-grade astrocytoma.

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Jason A. Ellis, Richard C. E. Anderson, Jonathan O'Hanlon, Robert R. Goodman, Neil A. Feldstein and Saadi Ghatan

Object

Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) may be refractory to available medical and surgical therapies. Patients with this condition may suffer from intractable headaches, experience visual deterioration, or have other symptoms related to elevated intracranial pressure. Internal cranial expansion (ICE) is a novel surgical procedure that the authors have developed for the treatment of patients with this condition. Here, they describe ICE and present their initial experience in using this surgical procedure for the treatment of patients with refractory IIH.

Methods

The authors conducted a retrospective review of 10 consecutive patients who underwent ICE for the treatment of IIH during a 5-year period. Preoperative and postoperative clinical parameters including patient symptoms, presence of papilledema, and available ICP or CSF opening pressures were compared. Procedural details and complications were noted. Intracranial volume increases were calculated using available pre- and postoperative CT scans.

Results

Follow-up for the 10 patients in this series ranged from 1 to 39.6 months (mean 15.5 months). Technically successful ICE was performed in all patients within the cohort. Surgical complications included a single postoperative seizure in one patient and a sagittal sinus tear with no clinical sequelae in another patient. At the time of last follow-up, 7 (70%) of 10 patients were either symptomatically improved or asymptomatic. Six (67%) of 9 patients with preoperative headaches had reduction or resolution of this symptom, and all patients (4 of 4) with preoperative papilledema had a reduction in or complete resolution of this sign. Postoperative ICP or CSF opening pressures were normal in all patients (4 of 4) tested. Postoperative intracranial volume expansion ranged between 3.8% and 12%.

Conclusions

Internal cranial expansion is a safe and effective surgery for the treatment of patients with refractory IIH. This surgery expands the intracranial volume and thus promotes ICP normalization, which may lead to the reduction or complete resolution of the signs and symptoms of IIH. Internal cranial expansion may be used as part of a multidisciplinary management approach in the treatment of refractory IIH.

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Benjamin C. Kennedy, Kathleen M. Kelly, Michelle Q. Phan, Samuel S. Bruce, Michael M. McDowell, Richard C. E. Anderson and Neil A. Feldstein

OBJECT

Symptomatic pediatric Chiari malformation Type I (CM-I) is most often treated with posterior fossa decompression (PFD), but controversy exists over whether the dura needs to be opened during PFD. While dural opening as a part of PFD has been suggested to result in a higher rate of resolution of CM symptoms, it has also been shown to lead to more frequent complications. In this paper, the authors present the largest reported series of outcomes after PFD without dural opening surgery, as well as identify risk factors for recurrence.

METHODS

The authors performed a retrospective review of 156 consecutive pediatric patients in whom the senior authors performed PFD without dural opening from 2003 to 2013. Patient demographics, clinical symptoms and signs, radiographic findings, intraoperative ultrasound results, and neuromonitoring findings were reviewed. Univariate and multivariate regression analyses were performed to determine risk factors for recurrence of symptoms and the need for reoperation.

RESULTS

Over 90% of patients had a good clinical outcome, with improvement or resolution of their symptoms at last follow-up (mean 32 months). There were no major complications. The mean length of hospital stay was 2.0 days. In a multivariate regression model, partial C-2 laminectomy was an independent risk factor associated with reoperation (p = 0.037). Motor weakness on presentation was also associated with reoperation but only with trend-level significance (p = 0.075). No patient with < 8 mm of tonsillar herniation required reoperation.

CONCLUSIONS

The vast majority (> 90%) of children with symptomatic CM-I will have improvement or resolution of symptoms after a PFD without dural opening. A non–dural opening approach avoids major complications. While no patient with tonsillar herniation < 8 mm required reoperation, children with tonsillar herniation at or below C-2 have a higher risk for failure when this approach is used.

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