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Wuyang Yang, Risheng Xu, Jose L. Porras, Clifford M. Takemoto, Syed Khalid, Tomas Garzon-Muvdi, Justin M. Caplan, Geoffrey P. Colby, Alexander L. Coon, Rafael J. Tamargo, Judy Huang and Edward S. Ahn

OBJECTIVE

Sickle cell disease (SCD) in combination with moyamoya syndrome (MMS) represents a rare complication of SCD, with potentially devastating neurological outcomes. The effectiveness of surgical revascularization in this patient population is currently unclear. The authors’ aim was to determine the effectiveness of surgical intervention in their series of SCD-MMS patients by comparing stroke recurrence in those undergoing revascularization and those undergoing conservative transfusion therapy.

METHODS

The authors performed a retrospective chart review of patients with MMS who were seen at the Johns Hopkins Medical Institution between 1990 and 2013. Pediatric patients (age < 18 years) with confirmed diagnoses of SCD and MMS were included. Intracranial stroke occurrence during the follow-up period was compared between surgically and conservatively managed patients.

RESULTS

A total of 15 pediatric SCD-MMS patients (28 affected hemispheres) were included in this study, and all were African American. Seven patients (12 hemispheres) were treated with indirect surgical revascularization. The average age at MMS diagnosis was 9.0 ± 4.0 years, and 9 patients (60.0%) were female. Fourteen patients (93.3%) had strokes before diagnosis of MMS, with an average age at first stroke of 6.6 ± 3.9 years. During an average follow-up period of 11.6 years, 4 patients in the conservative treatment group experienced strokes in 5 hemispheres, whereas no patient undergoing the revascularization procedure had any strokes at follow-up (p = 0.029). Three patients experienced immediate postoperative transient ischemic attacks, but all recovered without subsequent strokes.

CONCLUSIONS

Indirect revascularization is suggested as a safe and effective alternative to the best medical therapy alone in patients with SCD-MMS. High-risk patients managed on a regimen of chronic transfusion should be considered for indirect revascularization to maximize the effect of stroke prevention.

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William J. Mack, J Mocco, Daniel J. Hoh, Judy Huang, Tanvir F. Choudhri, Kurt T. Kreiter, Alan Lozier, Marcello Opperman, Alexander Poisik, Joshua Yorgason, Robert A. Solomon, Stephan A. Mayer and E. Sander Connolly Jr.

Object. Although upregulated adhesion molecule expression has been demonstrated in experimental models of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with aneurysmal SAH, the clinical significance of these proinflammatory findings remains unclear. The authors hypothesize that 1) serum levels of soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) are increased in all patients with aneurysmal SAH shortly after the hemorrhagic event, and 2) elevated soluble ICAM-1 values are associated with poor patient outcome, even when controlling for the severity of the initial hemorrhagic insult.

Methods. One hundred one patients were prospectively enrolled and stratified according to their admission Hunt and Hess grade and functional status at discharge (modified Rankin Scale [mRS] score). Soluble ICAM-1 levels were determined every other day for 12 days post-SAH by using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Early soluble ICAM-1 levels (post-SAH Days 2–4) were increased compared with levels in control patients without SAH (p < 0.05). Patients with aneurysmal SAH who had a poor outcome (mRS Grades 4–6) had significantly higher soluble ICAM-1 levels over the first 2 weeks post-SAH compared with patients who had a good outcome (mRS Grades 0–3, p < 0.01). This association with outcome was predicted by late increases (Day 6, p = 0.07; Days 8–12, p < 0.05) rather than early increases (p = not significant) and was best seen in patients with Hunt and Hess Grades I and II, in whom only those with poor outcomes demonstrated delayed ICAM-1 elevations (p < 0.05).

Conclusions. These data demonstrate a correlation between soluble ICAM-1 levels and functional outcome following aneurysmal SAH that appears to be, at least in part, independent of the initial hemorrhage.

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Matthew T. Bender, Geoffrey P. Colby, Li-Mei Lin, Bowen Jiang, Erick M. Westbroek, Risheng Xu, Jessica K. Campos, Judy Huang, Rafael J. Tamargo and Alexander L. Coon

OBJECTIVE

Flow diversion requires neointimal stent overgrowth to deliver aneurysm occlusion. The existing literature on aneurysm occlusion is limited by heterogeneous follow-up, variable antiplatelet regimens, noninvasive imaging modalities, and nonstandard occlusion assessment. Using a large, single-center cohort with low attrition and standardized antiplatelet tapering, the authors evaluated outcomes after flow diversion of anterior circulation aneurysms to identify predictors of occlusion and aneurysm persistence.

METHODS

Data from a prospective, IRB-approved database was analyzed for all patients with anterior circulation aneurysms treated by flow diversion with the Pipeline embolization device (PED) at the authors’ institution. Follow-up consisted of catheter cerebral angiography at 6 and 12 months postembolization. Clopidogrel was discontinued at 6 months and aspirin was reduced to 81 mg daily at 12 months. Occlusion was graded as complete, trace filling, entry remnant, or aneurysm filling. Multivariate logistic regression was performed to identify predictors of aneurysm persistence.

RESULTS

Follow-up catheter angiography studies were available for 445 (91%) of 491 PED procedures performed for anterior circulation aneurysms between August 2011 and August 2016. Three hundred eighty-seven patients accounted for these 445 lesions with follow-up angiography. The population was 84% female; mean age was 56 years and mean aneurysm size was 6.6 mm. Aneurysms arose from the internal carotid artery (83%), anterior cerebral artery (13%), and middle cerebral artery (4%). Morphology was saccular in 90% of the lesions, and 18% of the aneurysms has been previously treated. Overall, complete occlusion was achieved in 82% of cases at a mean follow-up of 14 months. Complete occlusion was achieved in 72%, 78%, and 87% at 6, 12, and 24 months, respectively. At 12 months, adjunctive coiling predicted occlusion (OR 0.260, p = 0.036), while male sex (OR 2.923, p = 0.032), aneurysm size (OR 3.584, p = 0.011), and incorporation of a branch vessel (OR 2.206, p = 0.035) predicted persistence. Notable variables that did not predict aneurysm occlusion were prior treatments, vessel of origin, fusiform morphology, and number of devices used.

CONCLUSIONS

This is the largest single-institution study showing high rates of anterior circulation aneurysm occlusion after Pipeline embolization. Predictors of persistence after flow diversion included increasing aneurysm size and incorporated branch vessel, whereas adjunctive coiling predicted occlusion.

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John W. Rutland, Kuang-Han Huang, Corey M. Gill, Dillan F. Villavisanis, Judy Alper, Gaurav Verma, Joshua B. Bederson, Bradley N. Delman, Raj K. Shrivastava and Priti Balchandani

OBJECTIVE

Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is a debilitating neurological disease that commonly results from neurovascular compression of the trigeminal nerve (CN V). Although the CN V has been extensively studied at the site of neurovascular compression, many pathophysiological factors remain obscure. For example, thalamic-somatosensory function is thought to be altered in TN, but the abnormalities are inadequately characterized. Furthermore, there are few studies using 7-T MRI to examine patients with TN. The purpose of the present study was to use 7-T MRI to assess microstructural alteration in the thalamic-somatosensory tracts of patients with TN by using ultra–high field MRI.

METHODS

Ten patients with TN and 10 age- and sex-matched healthy controls underwent scanning using 7-T MRI with diffusion tensor imaging. Structural images were segmented with an automated algorithm to obtain thalamus and primary somatosensory cortex (S1). Probabilistic tractography was performed between the thalamus and S1, and the microstructure of the thalamic-somatosensory tracts was compared between patients with TN and controls.

RESULTS

Fractional anisotropy of the thalamic-somatosensory tract ipsilateral to the site of neurovascular compression was reduced in patients (mean 0.43) compared with side-matched controls (mean 0.47, p = 0.01). The mean diffusivity was increased ipsilaterally in patients (mean 6.58 × 10−4 mm2/second) compared with controls (mean 6.15 × 10−4 mm2/second, p = 0.02). Radial diffusivity was increased ipsilaterally in patients (mean 4.91 × 10−4 mm2/second) compared with controls (mean 4.44 × 10−4 mm2/second, p = 0.01). Topographical analysis revealed fractional anisotropy reduction and diffusivity elevation along the entire anatomical S1 arc in patients with TN.

CONCLUSIONS

The present study is the first to examine microstructural properties of the thalamic-somatosensory anatomy in patients with TN and to evaluate quantitative differences compared with healthy controls. The finding of reduced integrity of these white matter fibers provides evidence of microstructural alteration at the level of the thalamus and S1, and furthers the understanding of TN neurobiology.