Search Results

You are looking at 11 - 20 of 49 items for

  • Author or Editor: Cheng-chia Lee x
Clear All Modify Search
Full access

Jason P. Sheehan, Cheng-Chia Lee, Zhiyuan Xu, Colin J. Przybylowski, Patrick D. Melmer and David Schlesinger

OBJECT

Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) has been shown to offer a high probability of tumor control for Grade I meningiomas. However, SRS can sometimes incite edema or exacerbate preexisting edema around the targeted meningioma. The current study evaluates the incidence, timing, and degree of edema around parasagittal or parafalcine meningiomas following SRS.

METHODS

A retrospective review was undertaken of a prospectively maintained database of patients treated with Gamma Knife radiosurgery at the University of Virginia Health System. All patients with WHO Grade I parafalcine or parasagittal meningiomas with at least 6 months of clinical follow-up were identified, resulting in 61 patients included in the study. The median radiographic follow-up was 28 months (range 6–158 months). Rates of new or worsening edema were quantitatively assessed using volumetric analysis; edema indices were computed as a function of time following radiosurgery. Statistical methods were used to identify favorable and unfavorable prognostic factors for new or worsening edema.

RESULTS

Progression-free survival at 2 and 5 years was 98% and 90%, respectively, according to Kaplan-Meier analysis. After SRS, new peritumoral edema occurred or preexisting edema worsened in 40% of treated meningiomas. The median time to onset of peak edema was 36 months post-SRS. Persistent and progressive edema was associated with 11 tumors, and resection was undertaken for these lesions. However, 20 patients showed initial edema progression followed by regression at a median of 18 months after radiosurgery (range 6–24 months). Initial tumor volume greater than 10 cm3, absence of prior resection, and higher margin dose were significantly (p < 0.05) associated with increased risk of new or progressive edema after SRS.

CONCLUSIONS

Stereotactic radiosurgery offers a high rate of tumor control in patients with parasagittal or parafalcine meningiomas. However, it can lead to worsening peritumoral edema in a minority of patients. Following radiosurgery, transient edema occurs earlier than persistent and progressive edema. Longitudinal follow-up of meningioma patients after SRS is required to detect and appropriately treat transient as well as progressive edema.

Restricted access

Dylan Russell, Travis Peck, Dale Ding, Ching-Jen Chen, Davis G. Taylor, Robert M. Starke, Cheng-Chia Lee and Jason P. Sheehan

OBJECTIVE

Embolization of brain arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) prior to stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) has been reported to negatively affect obliteration rates. The goal of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to compare the outcomes of AVMs treated with embolization plus SRS (E+SRS group) and those of AVMs treated with SRS alone (SRS group).

METHODS

A literature review was performed using PubMed to identify studies with 10 or more AVM patients and obliteration data for both E+SRS and SRS groups. A meta-analysis was performed to compare obliteration rates between the E+SRS and SRS groups.

RESULTS

Twelve articles comprising 1716 patients were eligible for analysis. Among the patients with radiological follow-up data, complete obliteration was achieved in 48.4% of patients (330/681) in the E+SRS group compared with 62.7% of patients (613/978) in the SRS group. A meta-analysis of the pooled data revealed that the obliteration rate was significantly lower in the E+SRS group (OR 0.51, 95% CI 0.41–0.64, p < 0.00001). Symptomatic adverse radiation effects were observed in 6.6% (27/412 patients) and 11.1% (48/433 patients) of the E+SRS and SRS groups, respectively. The annual post-SRS hemorrhage rate was 2.0%–6.5% and 0%–2.0% for the E+SRS and SRS groups, respectively. The rates of permanent morbidity were 0%–6.7% and 0%–13.5% for the E+SRS and SRS groups, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS

Arteriovenous malformation treatment with combined embolization and SRS is associated with lower obliteration rates than those with SRS treatment alone. However, this comparison does not fully account for differences in the initial AVM characteristics in the E+SRS group as compared with those in the SRS group. Further studies are warranted to address these limitations.

Restricted access

Chia-An Wu, Huai-Che Yang, Yong-Sin Hu, Hsiu-Mei Wu, Chung-Jung Lin, Chao-Bao Luo, Wan-Yuo Guo, Cheng-Chia Lee, Kang-Du Liu and Wen-Yuh Chung

OBJECTIVE

Gamma Knife surgery (GKS) obliterates 65%–87% of cavernous sinus dural arteriovenous fistulas (CSDAVFs). However, the hemodynamic effect on GKS outcomes is relatively unknown. The authors thus used the classification scheme developed by Suh et al. to explore this effect.

METHODS

The authors retrospectively (1993–2016) included 123 patients with CSDAVFs who received GKS alone at the institute and classified them as proliferative type (PT; n = 23), restrictive type (RT; n = 61), or late restrictive type (LRT; n = 39) after analyzing their pre-GKS angiography images. Treatment parameters, the presence of numerous arterial feeders, and venous drainage numbers were compared across the CSDAVF types. Patients’ follow-up MR images were evaluated for the presence of complete obliteration. A Kaplan-Meier analysis was conducted to determine the correlation between CSDAVF types and outcomes.

RESULTS

The 36-month probability of complete obliteration was 74.3% for all patients, with no significant differences across types (p = 0.56). PT had the largest radiation volume (6.5 cm3, p < 0.001), the most isocenters (5, p = 0.015) and venous drainage routes (3, p < 0.001), and the lowest peripheral dose (16.6 Gy, p = 0.011) and isodose level coverage (64.3%, p = 0.006). CSDAVFs presenting with ocular patterns were less likely to be completely obliterated (hazard ratio 0.531, p = 0.009). After adjustment for age, CSDAVFs with more venous drainage routes were less likely to be completely obliterated (hazard ratio 0.784, p = 0.039).

CONCLUSIONS

GKS is an equally effective treatment option for all 3 CSDAVF types. Furthermore, the number of venous drainage routes may help in predicting treatment outcomes and making therapeutic decisions.

Free access

Cheng-Chia Lee, Hideyuki Kano, Huai-Che Yang, Zhiyuan Xu, Chun-Po Yen, Wen-Yuh Chung, David Hung-Chi Pan, L. Dade Lunsford and Jason P. Sheehan

Object

Nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas (NFAs) are the most common type of pituitary adenoma and, when symptomatic, typically require surgical removal as an initial means of management. Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) is an alternative therapeutic strategy for patients whose comorbidities substantially increase the risks of resection. In this report, the authors evaluated the efficacy and safety of initial GKRS for NFAs.

Methods

An international group of three academic Gamma Knife centers retrospectively reviewed outcome data in 569 patients with NFAs.

Results

Forty-one patients (7.2%) underwent GKRS as primary management for their NFAs because of an advanced age, multiple comorbidities, or patient preference. The median age at the time of radiosurgery was 69 years. Thirty-seven percent of the patients had hypopituitarism before GKRS. Patients received a median tumor margin dose of 12 Gy (range 6.2–25.0 Gy) at a median isodose of 50%. The overall tumor control rate was 92.7%, and the actuarial tumor control rate was 94% and 85% at 5 and 10 years postradiosurgery, respectively. Three patients with tumor growth or symptom progression underwent resection at 3, 3, and 96 months after GKRS, respectively. New or worsened hypopituitarism developed in 10 patients (24%) at a median interval of 37 months after GKRS. One patient suffered new-onset cranial nerve palsy. No other radiosurgical complications were noted. Delayed hypopituitarism was observed more often in patients who had received a tumor margin dose > 18 Gy (p = 0.038) and a maximum dose > 36 Gy (p = 0.025).

Conclusions

In this study, GKRS resulted in long-term control of NFAs in 85% of patients at 10 years. This experience suggests that GKRS provides long-term tumor control with an acceptable risk profile. This approach may be especially valuable in older patients, those with multiple comorbidities, and those who have endocrine-inactive tumors without visual compromise due to mass effect of the adenoma.

Full access

Zhiyuan Xu, David Schlesinger, Krisztina Moldovan, Colin Przybylowski, Xingwen Sun, Cheng-Chia Lee, Chun-Po Yen and Jason Sheehan

Object

The authors evaluate the impact of target location on the rate of pain relief (PR) in patients with intractable trigeminal neuralgia (TN) undergoing stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS).

Methods

The authors conducted a retrospective review of 99 patients with idiopathic TN who were identified from a prospectively maintained database and were treated with SRS targeting the dorsal root entry zone with a maximum dose of 80 Gy. Targeting of the more proximal portion of a trigeminal nerve with the 50% isodose line overlapping the brainstem was performed in 36 patients (proximal group). In a matched group, 63 patients received SRS targeting the 20% isodose line tangential to the emergence of the brainstem (distal group). The median follow-up time was 33 months (range 6–124 months).

Results

The actuarial rate of maintenance of Barrow Neurological Institute (BNI) Pain Score I–IIIa was attained in 89% of patients at 1 year, 81% at 2 years, and 69% at 4 years, respectively, after SRS. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that durability of PR was only associated with the proximal location of the radiosurgical target (log-rank test, p = 0.018). Radiosurgery-induced facial numbness (BNI Score II or III) developed in 35 patients, which was significantly more frequent in the proximal group (19 patients [53%] compared with 16 [25%] in the distal group [p = 0.015]).

Conclusions

The radiosurgical target appears to affect the duration of pain relief in patients with idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia with the target closer to the brainstem affording extended pain relief. However, the proximal SRS target was also associated with an increased risk of mild to moderate facial numbness.

Free access

Cheng-Chia Lee, David Hung-Chi Pan, Wen-Yuh Chung, Kang-Du Liu, Huai-Che Yang, Hsiu-Mei Wu, Wan-Yuo Guo and Yang-Hsin Shih

Object

The authors retrospectively reviewed the efficacy and safety of Gamma Knife surgery (GKS) in patients with brainstem cavernous malformations (CMs). The CMs had bled repeatedly and placed the patients at high risk with respect to surgical intervention.

Methods

Between 1993 and 2010, 49 patients with symptomatic CMs were treated by GKS. The mean age in these patients was 37.8 years, and the predominant sex was female (59.2%). All 49 patients experienced at least 2 instances of repeated bleeding before GKS; these hemorrhages caused neurological deficits including cranial nerve deficits, hemiparesis, hemisensory deficits, spasticity, chorea or athetosis, and consciousness disturbance.

Results

The mean size of the CMs at the time of GKS was 3.2 cm3 (range 0.1–14.6 cm3). The mean radiation dose directed to the lesion was 11 Gy with an isodose level at 60.0%. The mean clinical and imaging follow-up time was 40.6 months (range 1.0–150.7 months). Forty-five patients participated in regularly scheduled follow-up. Twenty-nine patients (59.2%) were followed up for > 2 years, and 16 (32.7%) were followed up for < 2 years. The pre-GKS annual hemorrhage rate was 31.3% (69 symptomatic hemorrhages during a total of 220.3 patient-years). After GKS, 3 episodes of symptomatic hemorrhage were observed within the first 2 years of follow-up (4.29% annual hemorrhage rate), and 3 episodes of symptomatic hemorrhage were observed after the first 2 years of follow-up (3.64% annual hemorrhage rate). In this study of 49 patients, symptomatic radiation-induced complications developed in only 2 patients (4.1%; cyst formation in 1 patient and perifocal edema with neurological deficits in the other patient). There were no deaths in this group.

Conclusions

Gamma Knife surgery is effective in reducing the rate of recurrent hemorrhage. In the authors' experience, it was possible to control bleeding using a low-dose treatment. In addition, there were few symptomatic radiation-induced complications. As a result, the authors believe that GKS is a good alternative treatment for brainstem CMs.

Free access

Cheng-Chia Lee, Hsiu-Mei Wu, Wen-Yuh Chung, Ching-Jen Chen, David Hung-Chi Pan and Sanford P. C. Hsu

Object

Resection of vestibular schwannoma (VS) after Gamma Knife surgery (GKS) is infrequently performed. The goals of this study were to analyze and discuss the neurological outcomes and technical challenges of VS resection and to explore strategies for treating tumors that progress after GKS.

Methods

In total, 708 patients with VS underwent GKS between 1993 and 2012 at Taipei Veterans General Hospital. The post-GKS clinical courses, neurological presentations, and radiological changes in these patients were analyzed. Six hundred patients with imaging follow-up of at least 1 year after GKS treatment were included in this study.

Results

Thirteen patients (2.2%) underwent microsurgery on average 36.8 months (range 3–107 months) after GKS. The indications for the surgery included symptomatic adverse radiation effects (in 4 patients), tumor progression (in 6), and cyst development (in 3). No morbidity or death as a result of the surgery was observed. At the last follow-up evaluation, all patients, except 1 patient with a malignant tumor, had stable or near-normal facial function.

Conclusions

For the few VS cases that require resection after radiosurgery, maximal tumor resection can be achieved with modern skull-based techniques and refined neuromonitoring without affecting facial nerve function.

Restricted access

Chih-Chun Wu, Wan-Yuo Guo, Wen-Yuh Chung, Hisu-Mei Wu, Chung-Jung Lin, Cheng-Chia Lee, Kang-Du Liu and Huai-che Yang

OBJECTIVE

Gamma Knife surgery (GKS) is a promising treatment modality for patients with vestibular schwannomas (VSs), but a small percentage of patients have persistent postradiosurgical tumor growth. The aim of this study was to determine the clinical and quantitative MRI features of VS as predictors of long-term tumor control after GKS.

METHODS

The authors performed a retrospective study of all patients with VS treated with GKS using the Leksell Gamma Knife Unit between 2005 and 2013 at their institution. A total of 187 patients who had a minimum of 24 months of clinical and radiological assessment after radiosurgery were included in this study. Those who underwent a craniotomy with tumor removal before and after GKS were excluded. Study patients comprised 85 (45.5%) males and 102 (54.5%) females, with a median age of 52.2 years (range 20.4–82.3 years). Tumor volumes, enhancing patterns, and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values were measured by region of interest (ROI) analysis of the whole tumor by serial MRI before and after GKS.

RESULTS

The median follow-up period was 60.8 months (range 24–128.9 months), and the median treated tumor volume was 3.54 cm3 (0.1–16.2 cm3). At last follow-up, imaging studies indicated that 150 tumors (80.2%) showed decreased tumor volume, 20 (10.7%) had stabilized, and 17 (9.1%) continued to grow following radiosurgery. The postradiosurgical outcome was not significantly correlated with pretreatment volumes or postradiosurgical enhancing patterns. Tumors that showed regression within the initial 12 months following radiosurgery were more likely to have a larger volume reduction ratio at last follow-up than those that did not (volume reduction ratio 55% vs 23.6%, respectively; p < 0.001). Compared with solid VSs, cystic VSs were more likely to regress or stabilize in the initial postradiosurgical 6–12-month period and during extended follow-up. Cystic VSs exhibited a greater volume reduction ratio at last follow-up (cystic vs solid: 67.6% ± 24.1% vs 31.8% ± 51.9%; p < 0.001). The mean preradiosurgical maximum ADC (ADCmax) values of all VSs were significantly higher for those with tumor regression or stabilization at last follow-up compared with those with progression (2.391 vs 1.826 × 10−3 mm2/sec; p = 0.010).

CONCLUSIONS

Loss of central enhancement after radiosurgery was a common phenomenon, but it did not correlate with tumor volume outcome. Preradiosurgical MRI features including cystic components and ADCmax values can be helpful as predictors of treatment outcome.

Restricted access

Zhiyuan Xu, Cheng-Chia Lee, Arjun Ramesh, Adam C. Mueller, David Schlesinger, Or Cohen-Inbar, Han-Hsun Shih and Jason P. Sheehan

OBJECTIVE

Recent advancements in molecular biology have identified the BRAF mutation as a common mutation in melanoma. The wide use of BRAF kinase inhibitor (BRAFi) in patients with metastatic melanoma has been established. The objective of this study was to examine the impact of BRAF mutation status and use of BRAFi in conjunction with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS).

METHODS

This was a single-center retrospective study. Patient's charts and electronic records were reviewed for date of diagnosis of primary malignancy, BRAF mutation status, chemotherapies used, date of the diagnosis of CNS metastases, date of SRS, survival, local tumor control after SRS, and adverse events. Patients were divided into 3 groups: Group A, those with mutant BRAF without BRAFi treatment (13 patients); Group B, those with mutant BRAF with BRAFi treatment (17 patients); and Group C, those with wild-type BRAF (35 patients). Within a cohort of 65 patients with the known BRAF mutation status and treated with SRS between 2010 and 2014, 436 individual brain metastases (BMs) were identified. Kaplan-Meier methodology was then used to compare survival based on each binary parameter.

RESULTS

Median survival times after the diagnosis of melanoma BM and after SRS were favorable in patients with a BRAF mutation and treated with SRS in conjunction with BRAFi (Group B) compared with the patients with wild-type BRAF (Group C, 23 vs 8 months and 13 vs 5 months, respectively; p < 0.01, log-rank test). SRS provided a local tumor control rate of 89.4% in the entire cohort of patients. Furthermore, the local control rate was improved in the patients treated with SRS in conjunction with BRAFi (Group B) compared with patients with wild-type (Group C) or with BRAF mutation but no BRAFi (Group A) as an adjunct treatment for BMs.

CONCLUSIONS

BRAF mutation status appears to play an important role as a potent prognostic factor in patients harboring melanoma BM. BRAFi in conjunction with SRS may benefit this group of patients in terms of BM survival and SRS with an acceptable safety profile.