Search Results

You are looking at 11 - 20 of 25 items for

  • Author or Editor: Charles A. Sansur x
Clear All Modify Search
Full access

Christopher M. Maulucci, Charles A. Sansur, Vaneet Singh, Alexandra Cholewczynski, Snehal S. Shetye, Kirk McGilvray and Christian M. Puttlitz

OBJECT

Nerve root decompression to relieve pain and radiculopathy remains one of the main goals of fusion-promoting procedures in the subaxial cervical spine. The use of allograft facet spacers has been suggested as a potential alternative for performing foraminotomies to increase the space available for the cervical nerve roots while providing segmental stiffening. Therefore, the goal of this cadaveric biomechanical study was to determine the acute changes in kinetics and foraminal area after the insertion of cortical bone facet spacers into the subaxial cervical spine.

METHODS

Allograft spacers (2 mm in height) were placed bilaterally into cadaveric cervical spine specimens (C2-T1, age of donors 57.5 ± 9.5 years, n = 7) at 1 (C4–5) and 3 (C3–6) levels with and without laminectomies and posterior lateral mass screw fixation. Standard stereophotogrammetry under pure moment loading was used to assess spinal kinetics. In addition, the authors performed 3D principal component analysis of CT scans to determine changes in foraminal cross-sectional area (FCSA) available for the spinal nerve roots.

RESULTS

Generally, the introduction of 2-mm-height facet spacers to the cervical spine produced mild, statistically insignificant reductions in motion with particular exceptions at the levels of implantation. No significant adjacent-level motion effects in any bending plane were observed. The addition of the posterior instrumentation (PI) to the intact spines resulted in statistically significant reductions in motion at all cervical levels and bending planes. The same kinetic results were obtained when PI was added to spines that also had facet spacers at 3 levels and spines that had been destabilized by en bloc laminectomy. The addition of 2-mm facet spacers at C3–4, C4–5, and C5–6 did produce statistically significant increases in FCSA at those levels.

CONCLUSIONS

The addition of allograft cervical facet spacers should be considered a potential option to accomplish indirect foraminal decompression as measured in this cadaveric biomechanical study. However, 2-mm spacers without supplemental instrumentation do not provide significantly increased spinal segmental stability.

Free access

John D. Heiss, Kendall Snyder, Matthew M. Peterson, Nicholas J. Patronas, John A. Butman, René K. Smith, Hetty L. DeVroom, Charles A. Sansur, Eric Eskioglu, William A. Kammerer and Edward H. Oldfield

Object

The pathogenesis of syringomyelia in patients with an associated spinal lesion is incompletely understood. The authors hypothesized that in primary spinal syringomyelia, a subarachnoid block effectively shortens the length of the spinal subarachnoid space (SAS), reducing compliance and the ability of the spinal theca to dampen the subarachnoid CSF pressure waves produced by brain expansion during cardiac systole. This creates exaggerated spinal subarachnoid pressure waves during every heartbeat that act on the spinal cord above the block to drive CSF into the spinal cord and create a syrinx. After a syrinx is formed, enlarged subarachnoid pressure waves compress the external surface of the spinal cord, propel the syrinx fluid, and promote syrinx progression.

Methods

To elucidate the pathophysiology, the authors prospectively studied 36 adult patients with spinal lesions obstructing the spinal SAS. Testing before surgery included clinical examination; evaluation of anatomy on T1-weighted MRI; measurement of lumbar and cervical subarachnoid mean and pulse pressures at rest, during Valsalva maneuver, during jugular compression, and after removal of CSF (CSF compliance measurement); and evaluation with CT myelography. During surgery, pressure measurements from the SAS above the level of the lesion and the lumbar intrathecal space below the lesion were obtained, and cardiac-gated ultrasonography was performed. One week after surgery, CT myelography was repeated. Three months after surgery, clinical examination, T1-weighted MRI, and CSF pressure recordings (cervical and lumbar) were repeated. Clinical examination and MRI studies were repeated annually thereafter. Findings in patients were compared with those obtained in a group of 18 healthy individuals who had already undergone T1-weighted MRI, cine MRI, and cervical and lumbar subarachnoid pressure testing.

Results

In syringomyelia patients compared with healthy volunteers, cervical subarachnoid pulse pressure was increased (2.7 ± 1.2 vs 1.6 ± 0.6 mm Hg, respectively; p = 0.004), pressure transmission to the thecal sac below the block was reduced, and spinal CSF compliance was decreased. Intraoperative ultrasonography confirmed that pulse pressure waves compressed the outer surface of the spinal cord superior to regions of obstruction of the subarachnoid space.

Conclusions

These findings are consistent with the theory that a spinal subarachnoid block increases spinal subarachnoid pulse pressure above the block, producing a pressure differential across the obstructed segment of the SAS, which results in syrinx formation and progression. These findings are similar to the results of the authors' previous studies that examined the pathophysiology of syringomyelia associated with obstruction of the SAS at the foramen magnum in the Chiari Type I malformation and indicate that a common mechanism, rather than different, separate mechanisms, underlies syrinx formation in these two entities. Clinical trial registration no.: NCT00011245.

Full access

Charles A. Sansur, Kai-Ming G. Fu, Rod J. Oskouian Jr., Jay Jagannathan, Charles Kuntz iv and Christopher I. Shaffrey

✓ Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is an inflammatory rheumatic disease whose primary effect is on the axial skeleton, causing sagittal-plane deformity at both the thoracolumbar and cervicothoracic junctions. In the present review article the authors discuss current concepts in the preoperative planning of patients with AS. The authors also review current techniques used to treat sagittal-plane deformity, focusing on pedicle subtraction osteotomy at the thoracolumbar junction, as well as cervical extension osteotomy at the cervicothoracic junction.

Restricted access

Jay Jagannathan, Christopher I. Shaffrey, Rod J. Oskouian, Aaron S. Dumont, Christian Herrold, Charles A. Sansur and John A. Jane Sr.

Object

Although the clinical outcomes following anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) surgery are generally good, 2 major complications are graft migration and nonunion. These complications have led some to advocate rigid internal fixation and/or cervical immobilization postoperatively. This paper examines a single-surgeon experience with single-level ACDF without use of plates or hard collars in patients with degenerative spondylosis in whom allograft was used as the fusion material.

Methods

The authors conducted a retrospective review of a prospective database of (Cloward-type) ACDF operations performed by the senior author (J.A.J.) between July 1996 and June 2005. Radiographic follow-up included static and flexion/extension radiographs obtained to assess fusion, focal and segmental kyphosis, and change in disc space height. At most recent follow-up, the patients' condition was evaluated by an independent physician examiner. The Odom criteria and Neck Disability Index (NDI) were used to assess outcome.

Results

One hundred seventy patients underwent single-level ACDF for degenerative pathology during the study period. Their most common presenting symptoms were pain, weakness, and radiculopathy; 88% of patients noted ≥ 2 neurological complaints. The mean hospital stay was 1.76 days (range 0–36 days), and 3 patients (2%) had major immediate postoperative complications requiring reoperation. The mean duration of follow-up was 22 months (range 12–124 months). Radiographic evidence of fusion was present in 160 patients (94%). Seven patients (4%) showed radiographic evidence of pseudarthrosis, and graft migration was seen in 3 patients (2%). All patients had increases in focal kyphosis at the operated level on postoperative radiographs (mean −7.4°), although segmental alignment was preserved in 133 patients (78%). Mean change in disc space height was 36.5% (range 28–53%). At most recent clinical follow-up, 122 patients (72%) had no complaints referable to cervical disease and were able to carry out their activities of daily living without impairment. The mean postoperative NDI score was 3.2 (median 3, range 0–31).

Conclusions

Single-level ACDF without intraoperative plate placement or the use of a postoperative collar is an effective treatment for cervical spondylosis. Although there is evidence of focal kyphosis and loss of disc space height, radiographic evidence of fusion is comparable to that attained with plate fixation, and the rate of clinical improvement is high.

Restricted access

Adam S. Kanter, Alfa O. Diallo, John A. Jane Jr., Jason P. Sheehan, Ashok R. Asthagiri, Rod J. Oskouian, David O. Okonkwo, Charles A. Sansur, Mary Lee Vance, Alan D. Rogol and EdwardR. Laws Jr

Object

Despite ongoing advances in surgical and radiotherapeutic techniques, pediatric Cushing's disease remains a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. The authors report on the results of a single-center retrospective review of 33 pediatric patients with Cushing's disease, providing details with respect to clinical presentation, diagnostic evaluation, therapeutic course, complications, and outcomes.

Methods

There were 17 female and 16 male patients whose mean age was 13 years (range 5–19 years) in whom a diagnosis of Cushing's disease was based on clinical and biochemical criteria. Typical symptoms included weight gain (91%), prepubertal growth delay (83%), round facies (61%), hirsutism (58%), headache (45%), abdominal striae (42%), acne (33%), amenorrhea (24%), and hypertension (24%). In 67% of the cases, preoperative magnetic resonance images revealed a pituitary lesion and in 82% of the cases the imaging studies effectively predicted lateralization. Inferior petrosal sinus sampling was performed in seven patients (21%), and in all of these cases lateralization was 100% reliable. Fifty-five percent underwent selective adenomectomies and 45% underwent subtotal hypophysectomies.

Complications included one case of diabetes insipidus, one of persistent hypocortisolemia necessitating prolonged glucocorticoid replacement therapy, and one minor vascular injury that did not necessitate postoperative management modification or cause sequelae. There were no surgery-related deaths and no cases of postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leakage or meningitis. During a mean follow-up period of 44 months, clinical remission was ultimately achieved in 91% of patients: 76% after transsphenoidal surgery alone and an additional 15% after adjuvant radiosurgery and/or adrenalectomy following surgical failure. Three patients (12%) experienced disease recurrence and underwent a second surgical procedure at 18, 81, and 92 months, respectively; based on clinical and biochemical criteria a second remission was achieved in all. Three patients (9%) remain with persistent disease.

Conclusions

Pediatric Cushing's disease is a rare condition, often requiring a multidisciplinary diagnostic and a multimodal therapeutic approach for successful long-term remission.

Restricted access

Charles A. Sansur, Robert C. Frysinger, Nader Pouratian, Kai-Ming Fu, Markus Bittl, Rod J. Oskouian, Edward R. Laws and W. Jeffrey Elias

Object

Intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) is the most significant complication associated with the placement of stereotactic intracerebral electrodes. Previous reports have suggested that hypertension and the use of microelectrode recording (MER) are risk factors for cerebral hemorrhage. The authors evaluated the incidence of symptomatic ICH in a large cohort of patients with various diseases treated with stereotactic electrode placement. They examined the effect of comorbidities on the risk of ICH and independently assessed the risks associated with age, sex, use of MER, diagnosis, target location, hypertension, and previous use of anticoagulant medications. The authors also evaluated the effect of hemorrhage on length of hospital stay and discharge disposition.

Methods

Between 1991 and 2005, 567 electrodes were placed by two neurosurgeons during 337 procedures in 259 patients. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) was performed in 167 procedures, radiofrequency lesioning (RFL) of subcortical structures in 74, and depth electrodes were used in 96 procedures in patients with epilepsy. Electrodes were grouped according to target, patient diagnosis, use of MER, patient history of hypertension, and patient prior use of anticoagulant medication (stopped 10 days before surgery). The Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI) was used to evaluate the effect of comorbidities. The CCI score, patient age, length of hospital stay, and discharge status were continuous variables. Symptomatic hemorrhages were grouped as transient or leading to permanent neurological deficits.

Results

The risk of hemorrhage leading to permanent neurological deficits in this study was 0.7%, and the risk of symptomatic hemorrhage was 1.2%. A patient history of hypertension was the most significant factor associated with hemorrhage (p = 0.007). Older age, male sex, and a diagnosis of Parkinson disease (PD) were also significantly associated with hemorrhage (p = 0.01, 0.04, 0.007, respectively). High CCI scores, specific target locations, and prior use of anticoagulant therapy were not associated with an increased risk of hemorrhage. The use of MER was not found to be correlated with an increased hemorrhage rate (p = 0.34); however, the number of hemorrhages in the patients who underwent DBS was insufficient to draw definitive conclusions. The mean length of stay for the DBS, RFL, and depth electrode patient groups was 2.9, 2.6, and 11.0 days, respectively. For patients who received DBS and RFL, the mean duration of hospitalization in cases of symptomatic hemorrhage was 8.2 days compared with 2.7 days in those without hemorrhaging (p < 0.0001). Three of the seven patients with symptomatic hemorrhages were discharged home.

Conclusions

The placement of stereotactic electrodes is generally safe, with a symptomatic hemorrhage rate of 1.2%, and a 0.7% rate of permanent neurological deficit. Consistent with prior reports, this study confirms that hypertension is a significant risk factor for hemorrhage. Age, male sex, and diagnosis of PD were also significant risk factors. Patients with symptomatic hemorrhage had longer hospital stays and were less likely to be discharged home.

Restricted access

Editorial

Surgical complications in adult spondylolisthesis

Michael G. Fehlings and Doron Rabin

Restricted access

Jay Jagannathan, Ekawut Chankaew, Peter Urban, Aaron S. Dumont, Charles A. Sansur, John Kern, Benjamin Peeler, W. Jeffrey Elias, Francis Shen, Mark E. Shaffrey, Richard Whitehill, Vincent Arlet and Christopher I. Shaffrey

Object

In this paper, the authors review the functional and cosmetic outcomes and complications in 300 patients who underwent treatment for lumbar spine disease via either an anterior paramedian or conventional anterolateral retroperitoneal approach.

Methods

Seven surgeons performed anterior lumbar surgeries in 300 patients between August 2004 and December 2006. One hundred and eighty patients were treated with an anterior paramedian approach, and 120 patients with an anterolateral retroperitoneal approach. An access surgeon was used in 220 cases (74%). Postoperative evaluation in all patients consisted of clinic visits, assessment with the modified Scoliosis Research Society–30 instrument, as well as a specific questionnaire relating to wound appearance and patient satisfaction with the wound.

Results

At a mean follow-up of 31 months (range 12–47 months), the mean Scoliosis Research Society–30 score (out of 25) was 21.2 in the patients who had undergone the anterior paramedian approach and 19.4 in those who had undergone the anterolateral retroperitoneal approach (p = 0.005). The largest differences in quality of life measures were observed in the areas of pain control (p = 0.001), self-image (p = 0.004), and functional activity (p = 0.003), with the anterior paramedian group having higher scores in all 3 categories. Abdominal bulging in the vicinity of the surgical site was the most common wound complication observed and was reported by 22 patients in the anterolateral retroperitoneal group (18%), and 2 patients (1.1%) in the anterior paramedian group. Exposures of ≥ 3 levels with the anterolateral approach were associated with abdominal bulging (p = 0.04), while 1- or 2-level exposures were not (p > 0.05). Overall satisfaction with incisional appearance was higher in patients with an anterior paramedian incision (p = 0.001) and with approaches performed by an access surgeon (p = 0.004).

Conclusions

Patients who undergo an anterior paramedian approach to the lumbar spine have a higher quality of life and better cosmetic outcomes than patients undergoing an anterolateral retroperitoneal approach.

Restricted access

Rod J. Oskouian Jr., Christopher I. Shaffrey, Richard Whitehill, Charles A. Sansur, Nader Pouratian, Adam S. Kanter, Ashok R. Asthagiri, Aaron S. Dumont, Jason P. Sheehan, W. Jeffrey Elias and Mark E. Shaffrey

Object

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the results obtained in patients who underwent anterior stabilization for three-column thoracolumbar fractures.

Methods

The authors retrospectively reviewed available clinical and radiographic data (1997–2006) to classify three-column thoracolumbar fractures according to the Association for the Study of Internal Fixation (AO) system, neurological status, spinal canal compromise, pre- and postoperative segmental angulation, and arthrodesis rate.

The mean computed tomography–measured preoperative spinal canal compromise was 48.3% (range 8–92%), and the mean vertebral body height loss was 39.4%. The mean preoperative kyphotic deformity of 14.9° improved to 4.6° at the final follow-up examination. Although this angulation had increased a mean of 1.8° during the follow-up period, the extent of correction was still significant compared with the preoperative angulation (p < 0.01). There were no cases of vascular complication or neurological deterioration.

Conclusions

Contemporary anterior spinal reconstruction techniques can allow certain types of unstable three-column thoracolumbar fractures to be treated via an anterior approach alone. Compared with traditional posterior approaches, the anterior route spares lumbar motion segments and obviates the need for harvesting of the iliac crest.

Restricted access

Kai-Ming G. Fu, Justin S. Smith, David W. Polly Jr., Joseph H. Perra, Charles A. Sansur, Sigurd H. Berven, Paul A. Broadstone, Theodore J. Choma, Michael J. Goytan, Hilali H. Noordeen, D. Raymond Knapp Jr., Robert A. Hart, Reinhard D. Zeller, William F. Donaldson III, Oheneba Boachie-Adjei and Christopher I. Shaffrey

Object

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prospectively collected Scoliosis Research Society (SRS) database to assess the incidences of morbidity and mortality (M&M) in the operative treatment of degenerative lumbar stenosis, one of the most common procedures performed by spine surgeons.

Methods

All patients who underwent surgical treatment for degenerative lumbar stenosis between 2004 and 2007 were identified from the SRS M&M database. Inclusion criteria for analysis included an age ≥ 21 years and no history of lumbar surgery. Patients were treated with either decompression alone or decompression with concomitant fusion. Statistical comparisons were performed using a 2-sided Fisher exact test.

Results

Of the 10,329 patients who met the inclusion criteria, 6609 (64%) were treated with decompression alone, and 3720 (36%) were treated with decompression and fusion. Among those who underwent fusion, instrumentation was placed in 3377 (91%). The overall mean patient age was 63 ± 13 years (range 21–96 years). Seven hundred nineteen complications (7.0%), including 13 deaths (0.1%), were identified. New neurological deficits were reported in 0.6% of patients. Deaths were related to cardiac (4 cases), respiratory (5 cases), pulmonary embolus (2 cases), and sepsis (1 case) etiologies, and a perforated gastric ulcer (1 case). Complication rates did not differ based on patient age or whether fusion was performed. Minimally invasive procedures were associated with fewer complications and fewer new neurological deficits (p = 0.01 and 0.03, respectively).

Conclusions

The results from this analysis of the SRS M&M database provide surgeons with useful information for preoperative counseling of patients contemplating surgical intervention for symptomatic degenerative lumbar stenosis.