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  • Author or Editor: Alim P. Mitha x
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Alim P. Mitha, John H. Wong, Michael D. Hill and Mayank Goyal

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Michael K. Tso, Myunghyun M. Lee, Chad G. Ball, William F. Morrish, Alim P. Mitha, Andrew W. Kirkpatrick and John H. Wong

OBJECTIVE

Blunt cerebrovascular injury (BCVI) occurs in approximately 1% of the blunt trauma population and may lead to stroke and death. Early vascular imaging in asymptomatic patients at high risk of having BCVI may lead to earlier diagnosis and possible stroke prevention. The objective of this study was to determine if the implementation of a formalized asymptomatic BCVI screening protocol with CT angiography (CTA) would lead to improved BCVI detection and stroke prevention.

METHODS

Patients with vascular imaging studies were identified from a prospective trauma registry at a single Level 1 trauma center between 2002 and 2008. Detection of BCVI and stroke rates were compared during the 3-year periods before and after implementation of a consensus-based asymptomatic BCVI screening protocol using CTA in 2005.

RESULTS

A total of 5480 patients with trauma were identified. The overall BCVI detection rate remained unchanged postprotocol compared with preprotocol (0.8% [24 of 3049 patients] vs 0.9% [23 of 2431 patients]; p = 0.53). However, postprotocol there was a trend toward a decreased risk of stroke secondary to BCVI on a trauma population basis (0.23% [7 of 3049 patients] vs 0.53% [13 of 2431 patients]; p = 0.06). Overall, 75% (35 of 47) of patients with BCVI were treated with antiplatelet agents, but no patient developed new or progressive intracranial hemorrhage despite 70% of these patients having concomitant traumatic brain injury.

CONCLUSIONS

The results of this study suggest that a CTA screening protocol for BCVI may be of clinical benefit with possible reduction in ischemic complications. The treatment of BCVI with antiplatelet agents appears to be safe.

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Xiao Wu, David Durand, Vivek B. Kalra, Renu Liu and Ajay Malhotra

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Michael B. Avery, Ahmed Alaqeel, Amy B. Bromley, Yong-Xiang Chen, John H. Wong, Muneer Eesa and Alim P. Mitha

OBJECTIVE

Reliable animal models are an important aspect of translational research, especially for relatively uncommon clinical entities such as fusiform aneurysms. While several animal models exist, very few are tailored to cerebral fusiform aneurysms, which have unique attributes compared to abdominal fusiform aneurysms. The authors aimed to build from previous models to create a cerebral fusiform aneurysm model that is simple to use and reliable.

METHODS

Twelve female New Zealand White rabbits were assigned to 3 groups: group E, elastase only; group C, CaCl2 only; group EC, elastase + CaCl2. All rabbits underwent surgical exposure of the right common carotid artery (CCA) and 20 minutes of peri-carotid incubation with their respective chemicals. Angiography was performed 6 weeks later for arterial dilation measurements, with 50% increase in diameter being defined as fusiform aneurysm formation. The arterial segments, along with the contralateral CCAs, were harvested and assessed histologically for wall component measurements and elastin semiquantification. A separate rabbit underwent aneurysm creation per the group EC protocol and was treated with an endovascular flow-diversion device.

RESULTS

All of the group EC rabbits developed fusiform aneurysms (mean dilation of 88%), while none of the group E or group C rabbits developed aneurysms (p = 0.001). Histological analysis revealed increased internal elastic lamina fragmentation in the group EC aneurysms, which also had less tunica intima hyperplasia. All aneurysms exhibited thinning of the tunica media and reduction in elastin content. The use of an endovascular flow-diverting stent was successful, with complete parent vessel remodeling, as expected, 4 weeks after deployment.

CONCLUSIONS

The peri-arterial application of combined elastase and CaCl2 to the CCA appears sufficient to reliably produce fusiform aneurysms after 6 weeks. Exposure to elastase or CaCl2 individually appears insufficient, despite the observed histological changes to the arterial wall. The proposed fusiform aneurysm model is able to accommodate endovascular devices, simulating the tortuous pathway experienced in using such devices in human cerebral aneurysms and thus is a satisfactory model to use in translational research.