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Benjamin K. Hendricks, James S. Yoon, Kurt Yaeger, Christopher P. Kellner, J Mocco, Reade A. De Leacy, Andrew F. Ducruet, Michael T. Lawton and Justin R. Mascitelli

OBJECTIVE

Wide-necked aneurysms (WNAs) are a variably defined subset of cerebral aneurysms that require more advanced endovascular and microsurgical techniques than those required for narrow-necked aneurysms. The neurosurgical literature includes many definitions of WNAs, and a systematic review has not been performed to identify the most commonly used or optimal definition. The purpose of this systematic review was to highlight the most commonly used definition of WNAs.

METHODS

The authors searched PubMed for the years 1998–2017, using the terms “wide neck aneurysm” and “broad neck aneurysm” to identify relevant articles. All results were screened for having a minimum of 30 patients and for clearly stating a definition of WNA. Reference lists for all articles meeting the inclusion criteria were also screened for eligibility.

RESULTS

The search of the neurosurgical literature identified 809 records, of which 686 were excluded (626 with < 30 patients; 60 for lack of a WNA definition), leaving 123 articles for analysis. Twenty-seven unique definitions were identified and condensed into 14 definitions. The most common definition was neck size ≥ 4 mm or dome-to-neck ratio < 2, which was used in 49 articles (39.8%). The second most commonly used definition was neck size ≥ 4 mm, which was used in 26 articles (21.1%). The rest of the definitions included similar parameters with variable thresholds. There was inconsistent reporting of the precise dome measurements used to determine the dome-to-neck ratio. Digital subtraction angiography was the only imaging modality used to study the aneurysm morphology in 87 of 122 articles (71.3%).

CONCLUSIONS

The literature has great variability regarding the definition of a WNA. The most prevalent definition is a neck diameter of ≥ 4 mm or a dome-to-neck ratio of < 2. Whether this is the most appropriate and clinically useful definition is an area for future study.

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Christopher D. Duntsch, Qihong Zhou, Himangi R. Jayakar, James D. Weimar, Jon H. Robertson, Lawrence M. Pfeffer, Lie Wang, Zixiu Xiang and Michael A. Whitt

Object. The purpose of this study was to evaluate both replication-competent and replication-restricted recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) vectors as therapeutic agents for high-grade gliomas by using an organotypic brain tissue slice—glioma coculture system.

Methods. The coculture system involved growing different brain structures together to allow neurons from these tissues to develop synaptic connections similar to those found in vivo. Rat C6 or human U87 glioma cells were then introduced into the culture to evaluate VSV as an oncolytic therapy. The authors found that recombinant wild-type VSV (rVSV-wt) rapidly eliminated C6 glioma cells from the coculture, but also caused significant damage to neurons, as measured by a loss of microtubule-associated protein 2 immunoreactivity and a failure in electrophysiological responses from neurons in the tissue slice. Nonetheless, pretreatment with interferon beta (IFNβ) virtually eliminated VSV infection in healthy tissues without impeding any oncolytic effects on tumor cells. Despite the protective effects of the IFNβ pretreatment, the tissue slices still showed signs of cytopathology when exposed to rVSV-wt. In contrast, pretreatment with IFNβ and inoculation with a replication-restricted vector with its glycoprotein gene deleted (rVSV-ΔG) effectively destroyed rat C6 and human U87 glioma cells in the coculture, without causing detectable damage to the neuronal integrity and electrophysiological properties of the healthy tissue in the culture.

Conclusions. Data in this study provide in vitro proof-of-principle that rVSV-ΔG is an effective oncolytic agent that has minimal toxic side effects to neurons compared with rVSV-wt and therefore should be considered for development as an adjuvant to surgery in the treatment of glioma.

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Paul Klimo Jr., L. Madison Michael II, Garrett T. Venable and Douglas R. Taylor

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Zeev Feldman, Malcolm J. Kanter, Claudia S. Robertson, Charles F. Contant, Christopher Hayes, Michael A. Sheinberg, Cynthia A. Villareal, Raj K. Narayan and Robert G. Grossman

✓ The traditional practice of elevating the head in order to lower intracranial pressure (ICP) in head-injured patients has been challenged in recent years. Some investigators argue that patients with intracranial hypertension should be placed in a horizontal position, the rationale being that this will increase the cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) and thereby improve cerebral blood flow (CBF). However, ICP is generally significantly higher when the patient is in the horizontal position. This study was undertaken to clarify the issue of optimal head position in the care of head-injured patients. The effect of 0° and 30° head elevation on ICP, CPP, CBF, mean carotid pressure, and other cerebral and systemic physiological parameters was studied in 22 head-injured patients. The mean carotid pressure was significantly lower when the patient's head was elevated at 30° than at 0° (84.3 ± 14.5 mm Hg vs. 89.5 ± 14.6 mm Hg), as was the mean ICP (14.1 ± 6.7 mm Hg vs. 19.7 ± 8.3 mm Hg). There was no statistically significant change in CPP, CBF, cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen, arteriovenous difference of lactate, or cerebrovascular resistance associated with the change in head position. The data indicate that head elevation to 30° significantly reduced ICP in the majority of the 22 patients without reducing CPP or CBF.

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Hideyuki Kano, Jason Sheehan, Penny K. Sneed, Heyoung L. McBride, Byron Young, Christopher Duma, David Mathieu, Zachary Seymour, Michael W. McDermott, Douglas Kondziolka, Aditya Iyer and L. Dade Lunsford

OBJECT

Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is a potentially important option for patients with skull base chondrosarcomas. The object of this study was to analyze the outcomes of SRS for chondrosarcoma patients who underwent this treatment as a part of multimodality management.

METHODS

Seven participating centers of the North American Gamma Knife Consortium (NAGKC) identified 46 patients who underwent SRS for skull base chondrosarcomas. Thirty-six patients had previously undergone tumor resections and 5 had been treated with fractionated radiation therapy (RT). The median tumor volume was 8.0 cm3 (range 0.9–28.2 cm3), and the median margin dose was 15 Gy (range 10.5–20 Gy). Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to calculate progression-free and overall survival rates.

RESULTS

At a median follow-up of 75 months after SRS, 8 patients were dead. The actuarial overall survival after SRS was 89% at 3 years, 86% at 5 years, and 76% at 10 years. Local tumor progression occurred in 10 patients. The rate of progression-free survival (PFS) after SRS was 88% at 3 years, 85% at 5 years, and 70% at 10 years. Prior RT was significantly associated with shorter PFS. Eight patients required salvage resection, and 3 patients (7%) developed adverse radiation effects. Cranial nerve deficits improved in 22 (56%) of the 39 patients who deficits before SRS. Clinical improvement after SRS was noted in patients with abducens nerve paralysis (61%), oculomotor nerve paralysis (50%), lower cranial nerve dysfunction (50%), optic neuropathy (43%), facial neuropathy (38%), trochlear nerve paralysis (33%), trigeminal neuropathy (12%), and hearing loss (10%).

CONCLUSIONS

Stereotactic radiosurgery for skull base chondrosarcomas is an important adjuvant option for the treatment of these rare tumors, as part of a team approach that includes initial surgical removal of symptomatic larger tumors.

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Matthew L. Carlson, Øystein Vesterli Tveiten, Colin L. Driscoll, Christopher J. Boes, Molly J. Sullan, Frederik K. Goplen, Morten Lund-Johansen and Michael J. Link

OBJECT

The primary goals of this study were: 1) to examine the influence of disease and treatment on headache in patients with sporadic vestibular schwannoma (VS); and 2) to identify clinical predictors of long-term headache disability.

METHODS

This was a cross-sectional observational study with international multicenter enrollment. Patients included those with primary sporadic < 3-cm VS and a separate group of general population control subjects without tumors. Interventions included a postal survey incorporating the Headache Disability Inventory (HDI), the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and a VS symptom questionnaire. The main outcome measures were univariate and multivariable associations with HDI total score.

RESULTS

The overall survey response rate was 79%. Data from 538 patients with VS were analyzed. The mean age at time of survey was 64 years, 56% of patients were female, and the average duration between treatment and survey was 7.7 years. Twenty-seven percent of patients received microsurgery, 46% stereotactic radiosurgery, and 28% observation. Patients with VS who were managed with observation were more than twice as likely to have severe headache disability compared with 103 control subjects without VS. When accounting for baseline differences, there was no statistically significant difference in HDI outcome between treatment modalities at time of survey. Similarly, among the microsurgery cohort, the long-term risk of severe headache disability was not different between surgical approaches. Multivariable regression demonstrated that younger age, greater anxiety and depression, and a preexisting diagnosis of headache were the primary predictors of severe long-term headache disability, while tumor size and treatment modality had little influence.

CONCLUSIONS

At a mean of almost 8 years following treatment, approximately half of patients with VS experience headaches of varying frequency and severity. Patient-driven factors including age, sex, mental health, and preexisting headache syndrome are the strongest predictors of long-term severe headache disability. Tumor size and treatment modality have less impact. These data may assist with patient counseling regarding long-term expectations following diagnosis and treatment.

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Chad W. Washington, Gregory J. Zipfel, Michael R. Chicoine, Colin P. Derdeyn, Keith M. Rich, Christopher J. Moran, DeWitte T. Cross and Ralph G. Dacey Jr.

Object

The purpose of aneurysm surgery is complete aneurysm obliteration while sparing associated arteries. Indocyanine green (ICG) videoangiography is a new technique that allows for real-time evaluation of blood flow in the aneurysm and vessels. The authors performed a retrospective study to compare the accuracy of ICG videoangiography with intraoperative angiography (IA), and determine if ICG videoangiography can be used without follow-up IA.

Methods

From June 2007 through September 2009, 155 patients underwent craniotomies for clipping of aneurysms. Operative summaries, angiograms, and operative and ICG videoangiography videos were reviewed. The number, size, and location of aneurysms, the ICG videoangiography and IA findings, and the need for clip adjustment after ICG videoangiography and IA were recorded. Discordance between ICG videoangiography and IA was defined as ICG videoangiography demonstrating aneurysm obliteration and normal vessel flow, but post-IA showing either an aneurysmal remnant and/or vessel occlusion requiring clip adjustment.

Results

Thirty-two percent of patients (49 of 155) underwent both ICG videoangiography and IA. The post-ICG videoangiography clip adjustment rate was 4.1% (2 of 49). The overall rate of ICG videoangiography–IA agreement was 75.5% (37 of 49) and the ICG videoangiography–IA discordance rate requiring post-IA clip adjustment was 14.3% (7 of 49). Adjustments were due to 3 aneurysmal remnants and 4 vessel occlusions. These adjustments were attributed to obscuration of the residual aneurysm or the affected vessel from the field of view and the presence of dye in the affected vessel via collateral flow. Although not statistically significant, there was a trend for ICG videoangiography–IA discordance requiring clip adjustment to occur in cases involving the anterior communicating artery complex, with an odds ratio of 3.3 for ICG videoangiography–IA discordance in these cases.

Conclusions

These results suggest that care should be taken when considering ICG videoangiography as the sole means for intraoperative evaluation of aneurysm clip application. The authors further conclude that IA should remain the gold standard for evaluation during aneurysm surgery. However, a combination of ICG videoangiography and IA may ultimately prove to be the most effective strategy for maximizing the safety and efficacy of aneurysm surgery.

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Alim P. Mitha, Benjamin Reichardt, Michael Grasruck, Eric Macklin, Soenke Bartling, Christianne Leidecker, Bernhard Schmidt, Thomas Flohr, Thomas J. Brady, Christopher S. Ogilvy and Rajiv Gupta

Object

Imaging of intracranial aneurysms using conventional multidetector CT (MDCT) is limited because of nonvisualization of features such as perforating vessels, pulsatile blebs, and neck remnants after clip placement or coil embolization. In this study, a model of intracranial saccular aneurysms in rabbits was used to assess the ultra-high resolution and dynamic scanning capabilities of a prototype flat-panel volumetric CT (fpVCT) scanner in demonstrating these features.

Methods

Ten New Zealand white rabbits underwent imaging before and after clipping or coil embolization of surgically created aneurysms in the proximal right carotid artery. Imaging was performed using a prototype fpVCT scanner, a 64-slice MDCT scanner, and traditional catheter angiography. In addition to the slice data and 3D views, 4D dynamic views, a capability unique to fpVCT, were also created and reviewed. The images were subjectively compared on 1) 4 image quality metrics (spatial resolution, noise, motion artifacts, and aneurysm surface features); 2) 4 posttreatment features reflecting the metal artifact profile of the various imaging modalities (visualization of clip or coil placement, perianeurysmal clip/coil anatomy, neck remnant, and white-collar sign); and 3) 2 dynamic features (blood flow pattern and aneurysm pulsation).

Results

Flat-panel volumetric CT provided better image resolution than MDCT and was comparable to traditional catheter angiography. The surface features of aneurysms were demonstrated with much higher resolution, detail, and clarity by fpVCT compared with MDCT and angiography. Flat-panel volumetric CT was inferior to both MDCT and angiography in terms of image noise and motion artifacts. In fpVCT images, the metallic artifacts from clips and coils were significantly fewer than those in MDCT images. As a result, clinically important information about posttreatment aneurysm neck remnants could be derived from fpVCT images but not from MDCT images. Time-resolved dynamic sequences were judged slightly inferior to conventional angiography but superior to static MDCT images.

Conclusions

The spatial resolution, surface anatomy visualization, metal artifact profile, and 4D dynamic images from fpVCT are superior to those from MDCT. Flat-panel volumetric CT demonstrates aneurysm surface features to better advantage than angiography and is comparable to angiography in metal artifact profile. Even though the temporal resolution of fpVCT is not quite as good as that of angiography, fpVCT images yield clinically important anatomical information about aneurysm surface features and posttreatment neck remnants not attainable with either angiography or MDCT images.

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Takashi Morishita, Kelly D. Foote, Samuel S. Wu, Charles E. Jacobson IV, Ramon L. Rodriguez, Ihtsham U. Haq, Mustafa S. Siddiqui, Irene A. Malaty, Christopher J. Hass and Michael S. Okun

Object

Microelectrode recording (MER) and macrostimulation (test stimulation) are used to refine the optimal deep brain stimulation (DBS) lead placement within the operative setting. It is well known that there can be a microlesion effect with microelectrode trajectories and DBS insertion. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of intraoperative MER and lead placement on tremor severity in a cohort of patients with essential tremor.

Methods

Consecutive patients with essential tremor undergoing unilateral DBS (ventral intermediate nucleus stimulation) for medication-refractory tremor were evaluated. Tremor severity was measured at 5 time points utilizing a modified Tremor Rating Scale: 1) immediately before MER; 2) immediately after MER; 3) immediately after lead implantation; 4) 6 months after DBS implantation in the off-DBS condition; and 5) 6 months after implantation in the on-DBS condition. To investigate the impact of the MER and DBS lead placement, Wilcoxon signed-rank tests were applied to test changes in tremor severity scores over the surgical course. In addition, a generalized linear mixed model including factors that potentially influenced the impact of the microlesion was also used for analysis.

Results

Nineteen patients were evaluated. Improvement was noted in the total modified Tremor Rating Scale, postural, and action tremor scores (p < 0.05) as a result of MER and DBS lead placement. The improvements observed following lead placement were similar in magnitude to what was observed in the chronically programmed clinic setting parameters at 6 months after lead implantation. Improvement in tremor severity was maintained over time even in the off-DBS condition at 6 months, which was supportive of a prolonged microlesion effect. The number of macrostimulation passes, the number of MER passes, and disease duration were not related to the change in tremor severity score over time.

Conclusions

Immediate improvement in postural and intention tremors may result from MER and DBS lead placement in patients undergoing DBS for essential tremor. This improvement could be a predictor of successful DBS lead placement at 6 months. Clinicians rating patients in the operating room should be aware of these effects and should consider using rating scales before and after lead placement to take these effects into account when evaluating outcome in and out of the operating room.