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William E. Whitehead, Jay Riva-Cambrin, John C. Wellons III, Abhaya V. Kulkarni, Samuel Browd, David Limbrick, Curtis Rozzelle, Mandeep S. Tamber, Tamara D. Simon, Chevis N. Shannon, Richard Holubkov, W. Jerry Oakes, Thomas G. Luerssen, Marion L. Walker, James M. Drake and John R. W. Kestle

Object

Shunt survival may improve when ventricular catheters are placed into the frontal horn or trigone of the lateral ventricle. However, techniques for accurate catheter placement have not been developed. The authors recently reported a prospective study designed to test the accuracy of catheter placement with the assistance of intraoperative ultrasound, but the results were poor (accurate placement in 59%). A major reason for the poor accurate placement rate was catheter movement that occurred between the time of the intraoperative ultrasound image and the first postoperative scan (33% of cases). The control group of non–ultrasound using surgeons also had a low rate of accurate placement (accurate placement in 49%). The authors conducted an exploratory post hoc analysis of patients in their ultrasound study to identify factors associated with either catheter movement or poor catheter placement so that improved surgical techniques for catheter insertion could be developed.

Methods

The authors investigated the following risk factors for catheter movement and poor catheter placement: age, ventricular size, cortical mantle thickness, surgeon experience, surgeon experience with ultrasound prior to trial, shunt entry site, shunt hardware at entry site, ventricular catheter length, and use of an ultrasound probe guide for catheter insertion. Univariate analysis followed by multivariate logistic regression models were used to determine which factors were independent risk factors for either catheter movement or inaccurate catheter location.

Results

In the univariate analyses, only age < 6 months was associated with catheter movement (p = 0.021); cortical mantle thickness < 1 cm was near-significant (p = 0.066). In a multivariate model, age remained significant after adjusting for cortical mantle thickness (OR 8.35, exact 95% CI 1.20–infinity). Univariate analyses of factors associated with inaccurate catheter placement showed that age < 6 months (p = 0.001) and a posterior shunt entry site (p = 0.021) were both associated with poor catheter placement. In a multivariate model, both age < 6 months and a posterior shunt entry site were independent risk factors for poor catheter placement (OR 4.54, 95% CI 1.80–11.42, and OR 2.59, 95% CI 1.14–5.89, respectively).

Conclusions

Catheter movement and inaccurate catheter placement are both more likely to occur in young patients (< 6 months). Inaccurate catheter placement is also more likely to occur in cases involving a posterior shunt entry site than those involving an anterior shunt entry site. Future clinical studies aimed at improving shunt placement techniques must consider the effects of young age and choice of entry site on catheter location.

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Aimen Kasasbeh, Edward C. Hwang, Karen Steger-May, S. Kathleen Bandt, Amy Oberhelman, David Limbrick, Michelle M. Miller-Thomas, Joshua S. Shimony and Matthew D. Smyth

Object

Mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) is widely recognized as a significant underlying cause of temporal lobe epilepsy. Magnetic resonance imaging is routinely used in the preoperative evaluation of children with epilepsy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence, reliability, and prognostic value of MRI identification of MTS and MRI findings indicative of MTS in a series of patients who underwent resection of the medial temporal lobe for medically refractory epilepsy.

Methods

The authors reviewed the medical records and preoperative MRI reports of 25 patients who had undergone medial temporal resections (anterior temporal lobectomy or functional hemispherotomy) for medically intractable epilepsy. The preoperative MRI studies were presented for blinded review by 2 neuroradiologists who independently evaluated the radiographs for selected MTS features and provided a final interpretation. To quantify interrater agreement and accuracy, the findings of the 2 blinded neuroradiologists, the nonblinded clinical preoperative radiology report, and the final pathology interpretation were compared.

Results

The preoperative MRI studies revealed MTS in 6 patients (24%), and histopathological analysis verified MTS in 8 (32%) of 25 specimens. Six MRI features of MTS were specifically evaluated: 1) increased hippocampal signal intensity, 2) reduced hippocampal size, 3) atrophy of the ipsilateral hippocampal collateral white matter, 4) enlarged ipsilateral temporal horn, 5) reduced gray-white matter demarcation in the temporal lobe, and 6) decreased temporal lobe size. The most prevalent feature of MTS identified on MRI was a reduced hippocampal size, found in 11 of the MRI studies (44%). Analysis revealed moderate interrater agreement for MRI identification of MTS between the 2 blinded neuroradiologists and the nonblinded preoperative report (Cohen κ 0.40–0.59). Interrater agreement was highly variable for different MTS features indicative of MTS, ranging from poor to near perfect. Agreement was highest for increased hippocampal signal and decreased temporal lobe size and was consistently poor for reduced gray-white matter demarcation. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and proportion perfect agreement were highest for increased hippocampal signal and reduced hippocampal size. An MRI finding of MTS was not predictive of seizure outcome in this small series.

Conclusions

Mesial temporal sclerosis identification on brain MRI in children evaluated for medial temporal resections has a PPV of 55%–67% and an NPV of 79%–87%. Increased hippocampal signal and reduced hippocampal size were associated with high predictive values, while gray-white differentiation and an enlarged temporal horn were not predictive of MTS. Seizure outcome following medial temporal resections was not associated with MRI findings of MTS or MRI abnormalities indicative of MTS in this small sample size.

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James T. Rutka

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Michael Anthony Ciliberto, David Limbrick, Alexander Powers, Jeffrey B. Titus, Rebecca Munro and Matthew D. Smyth

Object

Intractable epilepsy is a significant burden on families and on the cognitive development and quality of life (QOL) of patients. Periinsular hemispherotomy (PIH) for medically intractable epilepsy can benefit patients who qualify for this procedure. The ideal hemispherotomy candidate has ipsilateral ictal and interictal epileptiform activity, unilateral MR imaging abnormalities, contralateral hemiplegia, and a normal contralateral hemisphere. However, certain patients present with a mixed picture of bilateral electroencephalography (EEG) findings and severe intractable epilepsy, prompting consideration of a more aggressive treatment approach. This report introduces the possibility of surgery for patients who normally would not meet criteria for this treatment modality.

Methods

In this retrospective chart review, the authors report on 7 patients with bilateral seizure onset noted on routine or video-EEG monitoring. A QOL phone questionnaire, based on the Quality of Life in Childhood Epilepsy tool, was administered to a parent. The authors reviewed each patient's chart for surgical complications, changes in examination, QOL, limited neuropsychological outcomes, and seizure outcomes. They also investigated each chart for MR imaging and EEG findings as well as the patient's epilepsy clinic notes for seizure semiology and frequency.

Results

All patients enjoyed a decrease in seizure frequency and a subjective increase in QOL after PIH. Five patients (71%) achieved Engel Class I or II seizure control. The mean follow-up was 3.64 years (2–5.3 years). One patient is now off all antiseizure medication. No patient had a decrement in Full Scale IQ on postsurgical testing, and 2 (28.5%) of 7 individuals had increased adaptive and social functioning. Postsurgical examination changes included hemiplegia and homonymous hemianopia.

Conclusions

Hemispherotomy in patients with intractable epilepsy is generally reserved for individuals with unilateral epileptiform abnormalities or lesions on MR imaging. Seven patients in this study benefited from surgery despite bilateral seizure onset with improvement in seizure control and overall QOL. Thus, bilateral ictal onset does not necessarily preclude consideration for hemispherotomy in selected patients with severe medically refractory epilepsy.