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  • Author or Editor: Jun-ichi Kuratsu x
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Takuichiro Hide, Shigetoshi Yano, Naoki Shinojima and Jun-ichi Kuratsu

OBJECT

To avoid disorientation during endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal surgery (ETSS), the confirmation of anatomical landmarks is essential. Neuronavigation systems can be pointed at exact sites, but their spatial resolution power is too low for the detection of vessels that cannot be seen on MR images. On Doppler ultrasonography the shape of concealed arteries and veins cannot be visualized. To address these problems, the authors evaluated the clinical usefulness of the indocyanine green (ICG) endoscope.

METHODS

The authors included 38 patients with pituitary adenomas (n = 26), tuberculum sellae meningiomas (n = 4), craniopharyngiomas (n = 3), chordomas (n = 2), Rathke's cleft cyst (n = 1), dermoid cyst (n = 1), or fibrous dysplasia (n = 1). After opening the sphenoid sinus and placing the ICG endoscope, the authors injected 12.5 mg of ICG into a peripheral vein as a bolus and observed the internal carotid arteries (ICAs), cavernous sinus, intercavernous sinus, and pituitary.

RESULTS

The ICA was clearly identified by a strong fluorescence signal through the dura mater and the covering thin bone. The intercavernous and cavernous sinuses were visualized a few seconds later. In patients with tuberculum sellae meningiomas, the abnormal tumor arteries in the dura were seen and the vague outline of the attachment was identified. At the final inspection after tumor removal, perforators to the brain, optic nerves, chiasm, and pituitary stalk were visualized. ICG fluorescence signals from the hypophyseal arteries were strong enough to see and spread to the area of perfusion with the passage of time.

CONCLUSIONS

The ICA and the patent cavernous sinus were detected with the ICG endoscope in real time and at high resolution. The ICG endoscope is very useful during ETSS. The authors suggest that the real-time observation of the blood supply to the optic nerves and pituitary helps to predict the preservation of their function.

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Branavan Manoranjan and Sheila K. Singh

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Naoki Shinojima, Hideo Nakamura, Masayoshi Tasaki, Kouki Kameno, Shigeo Anai, Ken-ichi Iyama, Yukio Ando, Hiroshi Seto and Jun-ichi Kuratsu

Medulloblastoma is the most frequent malignant brain tumor of the posterior fossa in children and is considered an embryonal tumor. It has been suggested that medulloblastomas be categorized into 4 distinct molecular subgroups— WNT (DKK1), SHH (SFRP1), Group 3 (NPR3), or Group 4 (KCNA1)—since each subgroup is distinct and there is no overlap. The authors report on a 13-year-old boy with medulloblastoma. He presented with sudden-onset nausea and vomiting due to intratumoral hemorrhage. The medulloblastoma was thought to be in an early developmental stage because the tumor volume was extremely small. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that the tumor was mainly composed of DKK1- and NPR3-positive areas. The individual areas of the tumor stained only for DKK1 or NPR3, with no overlap—that is, DKK1 and NPR3 expression were mutually exclusive. Samples obtained by laser microdissection of individual areas and subjected to mass spectrometry confirmed that the expression patterns of proteins were different. Fluorescence in situ hybridization for chromosome 6 showed there were 2 distinct types of cells that exhibited monosomy or disomy of chromosome 6. These results demonstrated that distinct subtypes of medulloblastoma may be present within a single tumor, an observation that has not been previously reported. Our findings in this case indicate that early-stage medulloblastoma may include more than 1 distinct subtype and hint at factors involved in the origin and development of medulloblastomas.

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Takanori Kamiryo, Kenji Tada, Shoji Shiraishi, Naoki Shinojima, Hideo Nakamura, Masato Kochi, Jun-ichi Kuratsu, Hideyuki Saya and Yukitaka Ushio

Object. One of the most frequent genetic abnormalities found in patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is homozygous deletion of the p16 tumor suppressor gene. The authors investigated whether this deletion is associated with prognosis in patients with GBM.

Methods. In 46 adult patients with supratentorial GBM, homozygous deletion of the p16 gene in tumor DNA was examined using the multiplex polymerase chain reaction assay. The deletion was confirmed in 14 (30.4%) of 46 patients, eight (30.8%) of 26 men and six (30.0%) of 20 women. Cox proportional hazard regression analysis, adjusted for age at surgery, the Karnofsky Performance Scale score, extent of resection, and the MIB-1 labeling index, revealed that homozygous deletion of the p16 gene was significantly associated with overall survival and progression-free survival in men, but not in women.

Conclusions. The results of this study suggest that p16 homozygous deletion is a significant unfavorable prognostic factor in male patients with GBM.