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  • Author or Editor: Cheng-chia Lee x
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Cheng-Chia Lee, Chun-Po Yen, Zhiyuan Xu, David Schlesinger and Jason Sheehan

Object

The use of radiosurgery has been well accepted for treating small to medium-size metastatic brain tumors (MBTs). However, its utility in treating large MBTs remains uncertain due to potentially unfavorable effects such as progressive perifocal brain edema and neurological deterioration. In this retrospective study the authors evaluated the local tumor control rate and analyzed possible factors affecting tumor and brain edema response.

Methods

The authors defined a large brain metastasis as one with a measurement of 3 cm or more in at least one of the 3 cardinal planes (coronal, axial, or sagittal). A consecutive series of 109 patients with 119 large intracranial metastatic lesions were treated with Gamma Knife surgery (GKS) between October 2000 and December 2012; the median tumor volume was 16.8 cm3 (range 6.0–74.8 cm3). The pre-GKS Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) score for these patients ranged from 70 to 100. The most common tumors of origin were non–small cell lung cancers (29.4% of cases in this series). Thirty-six patients (33.0%) had previously undergone a craniotomy (1–3 times) for tumor resection. Forty-three patients (39.4%) underwent whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) before GKS. Patients were treated with GKS and followed clinically and radiographically at 2- to 3-month intervals thereafter.

Results

The median duration of imaging follow-up after GKS for patients with large MBTs in this series was 6.3 months. In the first follow-up MRI studies (performed within 3 months after GKS), 77 lesions (64.7%) had regressed, 24 (20.2%) were stable, and 18 (15.1%) were found to have grown. Peritumoral brain edema as defined on T2-weighted MRI sequences had decreased in 79 lesions (66.4%), was stable in 21 (17.6%), but had progressed in 19 (16.0%). In the group of patients who survived longer than 6 months (76 patients with 77 MBTs), 88.3% of the MBTs (68 of 77 lesions) had regressed or remained stable at the most recent imaging follow-up, and 89.6% (69 of 77 lesions) showed regression of perifocal brain edema volume or stable condition. The median duration of survival after GKS was 8.3 months for patients with large MBTs. Patients with small cell lung cancer and no previous WBRT had a significantly higher tumor control rate as well as better brain edema relief. Patients with a single metastasis, better KPS scores, and no previous radiosurgery or WBRT were more likely to decrease corticosteroid use after GKS. On the other hand, higher pre-GKS KPS score was the only factor that showed a statistically significant association with longer survival.

Conclusions

Treating large MBTs using either microsurgery or radiosurgery is a challenge for neurosurgeons. In selected patients with large brain metastases, radiosurgery offered a reasonable local tumor control rate and favorable functional preservation. Exacerbation of underlying edema was rare in this case series. Far more commonly, edema and steroid use were lessened after radiosurgery. Radiosurgery appears to be a reasonable option for some patients with large MBTs.

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Cheng-Chia Lee, Ching-Jen Chen, Benjamin Ball, David Schlesinger, Zhiyuan Xu, Chun-Po Yen and Jason Sheehan

OBJECT

Onyx, an ethylene-vinyl alcohol copolymer mixed in a dimethyl sulfoxide solvent, is currently one of the most widely used liquid materials for embolization of intracranial arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). The goal of this study was to define the risks and benefits of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for patients who have previously undergone partial AVM embolization with Onyx.

METHODS

Among a consecutive series of 199 patients who underwent SRS between January 2007 and December 2012 at the University of Virginia, 25 patients had Onyx embolization prior to SRS (the embolization group). To analyze the obliteration rates and complications, 50 patients who underwent SRS without prior embolization (the no-embolization group) were matched by propensity score method. The matched variables included age, sex, nidus volume before SRS, margin dose, Spetzler-Martin grade, Virginia Radiosurgery AVM Scale score, and median imaging follow-up period.

RESULTS

After Onyx embolization, 18 AVMs were reduced in size. Total obliteration was achieved in 6 cases (24%) at a median of 27.5 months after SRS. In the no-embolization group, total obliteration was achieved in 20 patients (40%) at a median of 22.4 months after SRS. Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated obliteration rates of 17.7% and 34.1% in the embolization group at 2 and 4 years, respectively. In the no-embolization group, the corresponding obliteration rates were 27.0% and 55.9%. The between-groups difference in obliteration rates after SRS did not achieve statistical significance. The difference in complications, including adverse radiation effects, hemorrhage episodes, seizure control, and patient mortality also did not reach statistical significance.

CONCLUSIONS

Onyx embolization can effectively reduce the size of many AVMs. This case-control study did not show any statistically significant difference in the rates of embolization or complications after SRS in patients who had previously undergone Onyx embolization and those who had not.

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Ching-Jen Chen, Cheng-Chia Lee, Dale Ding, Robert M. Starke, Srinivas Chivukula, Chun-Po Yen, Shayan Moosa, Zhiyuan Xu, David Hung-Chi Pan and Jason P. Sheehan

OBJECT

The goal of this study was to evaluate the obliteration rate of intracranial dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVFs) in patients treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), and to compare obliteration rates between cavernous sinus (CS) and noncavernous sinus (NCS) DAVFs, and between DAVFs with and without cortical venous drainage (CVD).

METHODS

A systematic literature review was performed using PubMed. The CS DAVFs and the NCS DAVFs were categorized using the Barrow and Borden classification systems, respectively. The DAVFs were also categorized by location and by the presence of CVD. Statistical analyses of pooled data were conducted to assess complete obliteration rates in CS and NCS DAVFs, and in DAVFs with and without CVD.

RESULTS

Nineteen studies were included, comprising 729 patients harboring 743 DAVFs treated with SRS. The mean obliteration rate was 63% (95% CI 52.4%–73.6%). Complete obliteration for CS and NCS DAVFs was achieved in 73% and 58% of patients, respectively. No significant difference in obliteration rates between CS and NCS DAVFs was found (OR 1.72, 95% CI 0.66–4.46; p = 0.27). Complete obliteration in DAVFs with and without CVD was observed in 56% and 75% of patients, respectively. A significantly higher obliteration rate was observed in DAVFs without CVD compared with DAVFs with CVD (OR 2.37, 95% CI 1.07–5.28; p = 0.03).

CONCLUSIONS

Treatment with SRS offers favorable rates of DAVF obliteration with low complication rates. Patients harboring DAVFs that are refractory or not amenable to endovascular or surgical therapy may be safely and effectively treated using SRS.

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Cheng-Chia Lee, Hideyuki Kano, Huai-Che Yang, Zhiyuan Xu, Chun-Po Yen, Wen-Yuh Chung, David Hung-Chi Pan, L. Dade Lunsford and Jason P. Sheehan

Object

Nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas (NFAs) are the most common type of pituitary adenoma and, when symptomatic, typically require surgical removal as an initial means of management. Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) is an alternative therapeutic strategy for patients whose comorbidities substantially increase the risks of resection. In this report, the authors evaluated the efficacy and safety of initial GKRS for NFAs.

Methods

An international group of three academic Gamma Knife centers retrospectively reviewed outcome data in 569 patients with NFAs.

Results

Forty-one patients (7.2%) underwent GKRS as primary management for their NFAs because of an advanced age, multiple comorbidities, or patient preference. The median age at the time of radiosurgery was 69 years. Thirty-seven percent of the patients had hypopituitarism before GKRS. Patients received a median tumor margin dose of 12 Gy (range 6.2–25.0 Gy) at a median isodose of 50%. The overall tumor control rate was 92.7%, and the actuarial tumor control rate was 94% and 85% at 5 and 10 years postradiosurgery, respectively. Three patients with tumor growth or symptom progression underwent resection at 3, 3, and 96 months after GKRS, respectively. New or worsened hypopituitarism developed in 10 patients (24%) at a median interval of 37 months after GKRS. One patient suffered new-onset cranial nerve palsy. No other radiosurgical complications were noted. Delayed hypopituitarism was observed more often in patients who had received a tumor margin dose > 18 Gy (p = 0.038) and a maximum dose > 36 Gy (p = 0.025).

Conclusions

In this study, GKRS resulted in long-term control of NFAs in 85% of patients at 10 years. This experience suggests that GKRS provides long-term tumor control with an acceptable risk profile. This approach may be especially valuable in older patients, those with multiple comorbidities, and those who have endocrine-inactive tumors without visual compromise due to mass effect of the adenoma.

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Zhiyuan Xu, David Schlesinger, Krisztina Moldovan, Colin Przybylowski, Xingwen Sun, Cheng-Chia Lee, Chun-Po Yen and Jason Sheehan

Object

The authors evaluate the impact of target location on the rate of pain relief (PR) in patients with intractable trigeminal neuralgia (TN) undergoing stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS).

Methods

The authors conducted a retrospective review of 99 patients with idiopathic TN who were identified from a prospectively maintained database and were treated with SRS targeting the dorsal root entry zone with a maximum dose of 80 Gy. Targeting of the more proximal portion of a trigeminal nerve with the 50% isodose line overlapping the brainstem was performed in 36 patients (proximal group). In a matched group, 63 patients received SRS targeting the 20% isodose line tangential to the emergence of the brainstem (distal group). The median follow-up time was 33 months (range 6–124 months).

Results

The actuarial rate of maintenance of Barrow Neurological Institute (BNI) Pain Score I–IIIa was attained in 89% of patients at 1 year, 81% at 2 years, and 69% at 4 years, respectively, after SRS. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that durability of PR was only associated with the proximal location of the radiosurgical target (log-rank test, p = 0.018). Radiosurgery-induced facial numbness (BNI Score II or III) developed in 35 patients, which was significantly more frequent in the proximal group (19 patients [53%] compared with 16 [25%] in the distal group [p = 0.015]).

Conclusions

The radiosurgical target appears to affect the duration of pain relief in patients with idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia with the target closer to the brainstem affording extended pain relief. However, the proximal SRS target was also associated with an increased risk of mild to moderate facial numbness.

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Cheng-Chia Lee, Michael A. Reardon, Benjamin Z. Ball, Ching-Jen Chen, Chun-Po Yen, Zhiyuan Xu, Max Wintermark and Jason Sheehan

OBJECT

The current gold standard for diagnosing arteriovenous malformation (AVM) and assessing its obliteration after stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is digital subtraction angiography (DSA). Recently, MRI and MR angiography (MRA) have become increasingly popular imaging modalities for the follow-up of patients with an AVM because of their convenient setup and noninvasiveness. In this study, the authors assessed the sensitivity and specificity of MRI/MRA in evaluating AVM nidus obliteration as assessed by DSA.

METHODS

The authors study a consecutive series of 136 patients who underwent SRS between January 2000 and December 2012 and who underwent regular clinical examinations, several MRI studies, and at least 1 post-SRS DSA follow- up evaluation at the University of Virginia. The average follow-up time was 47.3 months (range 10.1–165.2 months). Two blinded observers were enrolled to interpret the results of MRI/MRA compared with those of DSA. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value for the obliteration of AVM were reported.

RESULTS

On the basis of DSA, 73 patients (53.7%) achieved final angiographic obliteration in a median of 28.8 months. The sensitivity (the probability of finding obliteration on MRI/MRA among those for whom complete obliteration was shown on DSA) was 84.9% for one observer (Observer 1) and 76.7% for the other (Observer 2). The specificity was 88.9% and 95.2%, respectively. The false-negative interpretations were significantly related to the presence of draining veins, perinidal edema on T2-weighted images, and the interval between the MRI/MRA and DSA studies.

CONCLUSIONS

MRI/MRA predicted AVM obliteration after SRS in most patients and can be used in their follow-up. However, because the specificity of MRI/MRA is not perfect, DSA should still be performed to confirm AVM nidus obliteration after SRS.

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Ching-Jen Chen, Srinivas Chivukula, Dale Ding, Robert M. Starke, Cheng-Chia Lee, Chun-Po Yen, Zhiyuan Xu and Jason P. Sheehan

Object

Seizures are a common presentation of cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). The authors evaluated the efficacy of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for the management of seizures associated with AVMs and identified factors influencing seizure outcomes following SRS for AVMs.

Methods

A systematic literature review was performed using PubMed. Studies selected for review were published in English, included at least 5 patients with both cerebral AVMs and presenting seizures treated with SRS, and provided post-SRS outcome data regarding obliteration of AVMs and/or seizures. Demographic, radiosurgical, radiological, and seizure outcome data were extracted and analyzed. All seizure outcomes were categorized as follows: 1) seizure free, 2) seizure improvement, 3) seizure unchanged, and 4) seizure worsened. Systematic statistical analysis was conducted to assess the effect of post-SRS AVM obliteration on seizure outcome.

Results

Nineteen case series with a total of 3971 AVM patients were included for analysis. Of these, 28% of patients presented with seizures, and data for 997 patients with available seizure outcome data who met the inclusion criteria were evaluated. Of these, 437 (43.8%) patients achieved seizure-free status after SRS, and 530 (68.7%) of 771 patients with available data achieved seizure control (seizure freedom or seizure improvement) following SRS. Factors associated with improved seizure outcomes following SRS for AVMs were analyzed in 9 studies. Seizure-free status was achieved in 82% and 41.0% of patients with complete and incomplete AVM obliteration, respectively. Complete AVM obliteration offered superior seizure-free rates compared with incomplete AVM obliteration (OR 6.13; 95% CI 2.16–17.44; p = 0.0007).

Conclusions

Stereotactic radiosurgery offers favorable seizure outcomes for AVM patients presenting with seizures. Improved seizure control is significantly more likely with complete AVM obliteration.

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Shayan Moosa, Ching-Jen Chen, Dale Ding, Cheng-Chia Lee, Srinivas Chivukula, Robert M. Starke, Chun-Po Yen, Zhiyuan Xu and Jason P. Sheehan

Object

The aim in this paper was to compare the outcomes of dose-staged and volume-staged stereotactic radio-surgery (SRS) in the treatment of large (> 10 cm3) arteriovenous malformations (AVMs).

Methods

A systematic literature review was performed using PubMed. Studies written in the English language with at least 5 patients harboring large (> 10 cm3) AVMs treated with dose- or volume-staged SRS that reported post-treatment outcomes data were selected for review. Demographic information, radiosurgical treatment parameters, and post-SRS outcomes and complications were analyzed for each of these studies.

Results

The mean complete obliteration rates for the dose- and volume-staged groups were 22.8% and 47.5%, respectively. Complete obliteration was demonstrated in 30 of 161 (18.6%) and 59 of 120 (49.2%) patients in the dose- and volume-staged groups, respectively. The mean rates of symptomatic radiation-induced changes were 13.5% and 13.6% in dose- and volume-staged groups, respectively. The mean rates of cumulative post-SRS latency period hemorrhage were 12.3% and 17.8% in the dose- and volume-staged groups, respectively. The mean rates of post-SRS mortality were 3.2% and 4.6% in dose- and volume-staged groups, respectively.

Conclusions

Volume-staged SRS affords higher obliteration rates and similar complication rates compared with dose-staged SRS. Thus, volume-staged SRS may be a superior approach for large AVMs that are not amenable to single-session SRS. Staged radiosurgery should be considered as an efficacious component of multimodality AVM management.

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Zhiyuan Xu, Carissa Carlson, John Snell, Matt Eames, Arik Hananel, M. Beatriz Lopes, Prashant Raghavan, Cheng-Chia Lee, Chun-Po Yen, David Schlesinger, Neal F. Kassell, Jean-Francois Aubry and Jason Sheehan

OBJECT

In biological tissues, it is known that the creation of gas bubbles (cavitation) during ultrasound exposure is more likely to occur at lower rather than higher frequencies. Upon collapsing, such bubbles can induce hemorrhage. Thus, acoustic inertial cavitation secondary to a 220-kHz MRI-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) surgery is a serious safety issue, and animal studies are mandatory for laying the groundwork for the use of low-frequency systems in future clinical trials. The authors investigate here the in vivo potential thresholds of MRgFUS-induced inertial cavitation and MRgFUS-induced thermal coagulation using MRI, acoustic spectroscopy, and histology.

METHODS

Ten female piglets that had undergone a craniectomy were sonicated using a 220-kHz transcranial MRgFUS system over an acoustic energy range of 5600–14,000 J. For each piglet, a long-duration sonication (40-second duration) was performed on the right thalamus, and a short sonication (20-second duration) was performed on the left thalamus. An acoustic power range of 140–300 W was used for long-duration sonications and 300–700 W for short-duration sonications. Signals collected by 2 passive cavitation detectors were stored in memory during each sonication, and any subsequent cavitation activity was integrated within the bandwidth of the detectors. Real-time 2D MR thermometry was performed during the sonications. T1-weighted, T2-weighted, gradient-recalled echo, and diffusion-weighted imaging MRI was performed after treatment to assess the lesions. The piglets were killed immediately after the last series of posttreatment MR images were obtained. Their brains were harvested, and histological examinations were then performed to further evaluate the lesions.

RESULTS

Two types of lesions were induced: thermal ablation lesions, as evidenced by an acute ischemic infarction on MRI and histology, and hemorrhagic lesions, associated with inertial cavitation. Passive cavitation signals exhibited 3 main patterns identified as follows: no cavitation, stable cavitation, and inertial cavitation. Low-power and longer sonications induced only thermal lesions, with a peak temperature threshold for lesioning of 53°C. Hemorrhagic lesions occurred only with high-power and shorter sonications. The sizes of the hemorrhages measured on macroscopic histological examinations correlated with the intensity of the cavitation activity (R2 = 0.74). The acoustic cavitation activity detected by the passive cavitation detectors exhibited a threshold of 0.09 V·Hz for the occurrence of hemorrhages.

CONCLUSIONS

This work demonstrates that 220-kHz ultrasound is capable of inducing a thermal lesion in the brain of living swines without hemorrhage. Although the same acoustic energy can induce either a hemorrhage or a thermal lesion, it seems that low-power, long-duration sonication is less likely to cause hemorrhage and may be safer. Although further study is needed to decrease the likelihood of ischemic infarction associated with the 220-kHz ultrasound, the threshold established in this work may allow for the detection and prevention of deleterious cavitations.