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  • Author or Editor: Masato Kochi x
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Naoki Shinojima, Kazutaka Ohta, Shigetoshi Yano, Hideo Nakamura, Masato Kochi, Yasuji Ishimaru, Youichi Nakazato and Yukitaka Ushio

✓ Myofibroblastoma is a rare type of benign mesenchymal tumor; only two cases of intracranial myofibroblastoma have been reported in the literature. The authors report on the case of a 34-year-old woman with a myofibroblastoma in the suprasellar region who presented with the complaint of sudden onset of headache followed within 2 weeks by progressively worsening visual disturbance. Computerized tomography scanning demonstrated a mixed low- and high-density mass in the suprasellar region and contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging revealed the mass to be of mixed intensity with heterogeneous enhancement. The tumor was subtotally removed via a right frontobasal translamina—terminalis approach and her vision improved immediately. Histologically, the tumor was characterized by alternating areas of spindle-shaped and round cells that were separated by collagen fibers. The diagnosis of myofibroblastoma was based on the tumor's intense immunoreactivity for α—smooth-muscle actin and the ultrastructural identification of myofibroblasts. The tumor was thought to have originated from the meninges in the suprasellar region.

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Naoki Shinojima, Masato Kochi, Jun-Ichiro Hamada, Hideo Nakamura, Shigetoshi Yano, Keishi Makino, Hiromasa Tsuiki, Kenji Tada, Jun-Ichi Kuratsu, Yasuji Ishimaru and Yukitaka Ushio

Object. Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) remains incurable by conventional treatments, although some patients experience long-term survival. A younger age, a higher Karnofsky Performance Scale (KPS) score, more aggressive treatment, and long progression-free intervals have been reported to be positively associated with long-term postoperative patient survival. The aim of this retrospective study was the identification of additional favorable prognostic factors affecting long-term survival in surgically treated adult patients with supratentorial GBM.

Methods. Of 113 adult patients newly diagnosed with histologically verified supratentorial GBM who were enrolled in Phase III trials during the period between 1987 and 1998, six (5.3%) who survived for longer than 5 years were defined as long-term survivors, whereas the remaining 107 patients served as controls. All six were women and were compared with the controls; they were younger (mean age 44.2 years, range 31–60 years), and their preoperative KPS scores were higher (mean 85, range 60–100). Four of the six patients underwent gross-total resection. In five patients (83.3%) the progression-free interval was longer than 5 years and in three a histopathological diagnosis of giant cell GBM was made. This diagnosis was not made in the other 107 patients.

Conclusions. Among adult patients with supratentorial GBM, female sex and histopathological characteristics consistent with giant cell GBM may be predictive of a better survival rate, as may traditional factors (that is, younger age, good KPS score, more aggressive resection, and a long progression-free interval).