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  • Author or Editor: Yi-Chieh Hung x
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Yi-Chieh Hung, Nasser Mohammed, Thomas Jose Eluvathingal Muttikkal, Kathryn N. Kearns, Chelsea Eileen Li, Aditya Narayan, David Schlesinger, Zhiyuan Xu and Jason P. Sheehan

OBJECTIVE

The benefits and risks of pre–stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) embolization have been reported in different studies. The goal of this study was to compare the long-term outcome of arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) treated with and without pre-SRS embolization.

METHODS

A database including 1159 patients with AVMs who underwent SRS was reviewed. The embolized group was selected by including AVMs with pre-SRS embolization, maximal diameter > 30 mm, and estimated volume > 8 ml. The nonembolized group was defined as AVMs treated by SRS alone with matched de novo nidus volume. Outcomes including incidences of favorable clinical outcome (obliteration without hemorrhage, cyst formation, worsening, or new seizures), obliteration, adverse effects, and angioarchitectural complexity were evaluated.

RESULTS

The study cohort comprised 17 patients in the embolized group (median AVM volume 17.0 ml) and 35 patients in the nonembolized group (median AVM volume 13.1 ml). The rates of obliteration (embolized cohort: 33%, 44%, and 56%; nonembolized cohort: 32%, 47%, and 47% at 4, 6, and 10 years, respectively) and favorable outcome were comparable between the 2 groups. However, the embolized group had a significantly higher incidence of repeat SRS (41% vs 23%, p = 0.012) and total procedures (median number of procedures 4 vs 1, p < 0.001), even with a significantly higher margin dose delivered at the first SRS (23 Gy vs 17 Gy, p < 0.001). The median angioarchitectural complexity score was reduced from 7 to 5 after embolization. Collateral flow and neovascularization were more frequently observed in the embolized nonobliterated AVMs.

CONCLUSIONS

Both embolization plus SRS and SRS alone were effective therapies for moderately large (8–39 ml) AVMs. Even with a significantly higher prescription dose at the time of initial SRS, the embolized group still required more procedures to reach final obliteration. The presence of collateral flow and neovascularization could be risk factors for a failure to obliterate following treatment.

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Nasser Mohammed, Dale Ding, Yi-Chieh Hung, Zhiyuan Xu, Cheng-Chia Lee, Hideyuki Kano, Roberto Martínez-Álvarez, Nuria Martínez-Moreno, David Mathieu, Mikulas Kosak, Christopher P. Cifarelli, Gennadiy A. Katsevman, L. Dade Lunsford, Mary Lee Vance and Jason P. Sheehan

OBJECTIVE

The role of primary stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) in patients with medically refractory acromegaly who are not operative candidates or who refuse resection is poorly understood. The aim of this multicenter, matched cohort study was to compare the outcomes of primary versus postoperative SRS for acromegaly.

METHODS

The authors reviewed an International Radiosurgery Research Foundation database of 398 patients with acromegaly who underwent SRS and categorized them into primary or postoperative cohorts. Patients in the primary SRS cohort were matched, in a 1:2 ratio, to those in the postoperative SRS cohort, and the outcomes of the 2 matched cohorts were compared.

RESULTS

The study cohort comprised 78 patients (median follow-up 66.4 months), including 26 and 52 in the matched primary and postoperative SRS cohorts, respectively. In the primary SRS cohort, the actuarial endocrine remission rates at 2 and 5 years were 20% and 42%, respectively. The Cox proportional hazards model showed that a lower pre-SRS insulin-like growth factor–1 level was predictive of initial endocrine remission (p = 0.03), whereas a lower SRS margin dose was predictive of biochemical recurrence after initial remission (p = 0.01). There were no differences in the rates of radiological tumor control (p = 0.34), initial endocrine remission (p = 0.23), biochemical recurrence after initial remission (p = 0.33), recurrence-free survival (p = 0.32), or hypopituitarism (p = 0.67) between the 2 matched cohorts.

CONCLUSIONS

Primary SRS has a reasonable benefit-to-risk profile for patients with acromegaly in whom resection is not possible, and it has similar outcomes to endocrinologically comparable patients who undergo postoperative SRS. SRS with medical therapy in the latent period can be used as an alternative to surgery in selected patients who cannot or do not wish to undergo resection.

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Yi-Chieh Hung, Cheng-Chia Lee, Huai-che Yang, Nasser Mohammed, Kathryn N. Kearns, Ahmed M. Nabeel, Khaled Abdel Karim, Reem M. Emad Eldin, Amr M. N. El-Shehaby, Wael A. Reda, Sameh R. Tawadros, Roman Liscak, Jana Jezkova, L. Dade Lunsford, Hideyuki Kano, Nathaniel D. Sisterson, Roberto Martínez Álvarez, Nuria E. Martínez Moreno, Douglas Kondziolka, John G. Golfinos, Inga Grills, Andrew Thompson, Hamid Borghei-Razavi, Tanmoy Kumar Maiti, Gene H. Barnett, James McInerney, Brad E. Zacharia, Zhiyuan Xu and Jason P. Sheehan

OBJECTIVE

The most common functioning pituitary adenoma is prolactinoma. Patients with medically refractory or residual/recurrent tumors that are not amenable to resection can be treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). The aim of this multicenter study was to evaluate the role of SRS for treating prolactinomas.

METHODS

This retrospective study included prolactinomas treated with SRS between 1997 and 2016 at ten institutions. Patients’ clinical and treatment parameters were investigated. Patients were considered to be in endocrine remission when they had a normal level of prolactin (PRL) without requiring dopamine agonist medications. Endocrine control was defined as endocrine remission or a controlled PRL level ≤ 30 ng/ml with dopamine agonist therapy. Other outcomes were evaluated including new-onset hormone deficiency, tumor recurrence, and new neurological complications.

RESULTS

The study cohort comprised 289 patients. The endocrine remission rates were 28%, 41%, and 54% at 3, 5, and 8 years after SRS, respectively. Following SRS, 25% of patients (72/289) had new hormone deficiency. Sixty-three percent of the patients (127/201) with available data attained endocrine control. Three percent of patients (9/269) had a new visual complication after SRS. Five percent of the patients (13/285) were recorded as having tumor progression. A pretreatment PRL level ≤ 270 ng/ml was a predictor of endocrine remission (p = 0.005, adjusted HR 0.487). An increasing margin dose resulted in better endocrine control after SRS (p = 0.033, adjusted OR 1.087).

CONCLUSIONS

In patients with medically refractory prolactinomas or a residual/recurrent prolactinoma, SRS affords remarkable therapeutic effects in endocrine remission, endocrine control, and tumor control. New-onset hypopituitarism is the most common adverse event.