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  • Author or Editor: Prasad Vannemreddy x
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Prasad Vannemreddy, Gloria Caldito, Brian Willis and Anil Nanda

Object

The purpose of this study was to determine whether cocaine use is a significant prognostic factor for outcome measures such as Hunt and Hess grade and Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) score among patients presenting with ruptured intracranial aneurysms (IAs).

Methods

The authors performed a MEDLINE/PubMed search for cases of ruptured IAs associated with cocaine use. Fourteen cases from the authors' experience were combined with 50 from a literature review, for a total of 64 cases associated with cocaine use. These 64 cases were compared with 65 cases without cocaine use (controls), which had been obtained from an aneurysm database. Logistic regression analysis was performed to determine significant prognostic factors for a poor Hunt and Hess grade and a poor GOS score, and a general linear model was applied to identify significant factors for these measures among cocaine users.

Results

There were 40 women in each group. The mean age was 32.3 ± 8.1 years in the cocaine group and 49.7 ± 10.6 years in the control group; thus, patients in the cocaine group were significantly younger (p < 0.01). Cocaine was snorted in 21% of cases, smoked in 55%, and intravenously injected or taken in through a combination of routes in 24%. Fifty-one percent of cocaine users and 7.7% of nonusers presented with a poor GOS score (p < 0.01). Fifty-six percent had ictus during cocaine abuse. At the end of a 30-day follow-up, 51% of the patients in the cocaine group had a good GOS score compared with 92% in the control group (p < 0.01). Controlling for the effects of other significant factors, cocaine use had a significant effect on Hunt and Hess grade (p < 0.03) and GOS score (p < 0.01). The odds of having a poor Hunt and Hess grade among cocaine users were 4.2 times greater than those in nonusers, and the odds of having a poor GOS score among cocaine users were 38.8 times greater.

Conclusions

Aneurysms were significantly smaller and ruptured at a younger age among cocaine users compared with nonusers. Although the poor clinical grade was not significantly different between the 2 groups, outcome was significantly worse in cocaine users.

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Christina Notarianni, Prasad Vannemreddy, Gloria Caldito, Papireddy Bollam, Esther Wylen, Brian Willis and Anil Nanda

Object

Hydrocephalus is a notorious neurosurgical disease that carries the adage “once a shunt always a shunt.” This study was conducted to review the treatment results of pediatric hydrocephalus.

Methods

Pediatric patients who underwent ventriculoperitoneal shunt surgery over the past 14 years were reviewed for shunt revisions. Variables studied included age at shunt placement, revision, or replacement; programmable shunts; infection; obstruction; and diagnosis (congenital, posthemorrhagic, craniospinal dysraphism, and others including trauma, tumors, and infection). Multiple regression analysis methods were used to determine independent risk factors for shunt failure and the number of shunt revisions. The Kaplan-Meier method of survival analysis was used to compare etiologies on the 5-year survival (revision-free) rate and the median 5-year survival time.

Results

A total of 253 patients were studied with an almost equal sex distribution. There were 92 patients with congenital hydrocephalus, 69 with posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus, 48 with craniospinal dysraphism, and 44 with other causes. Programmable shunts were used in 73 patients (other types of shunts were used in 180 patients). A total of 197 patients (78%) underwent revision surgeries due to shunt failures. The mortality rate was 1.6%. Age at first revision, the 5-year survival rate, and the median 5-year survival time were significantly less for both posthemorrhagic and craniospinal dysraphism than for either the congenital or “other” group (p < 0.05). The failure rate and number of revisions were not significantly reduced with programmable shunts compared with either pressure-controlled or no-valve shunts (p > 0.5).

Conclusions

Posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus and craniospinal dysraphism hydrocephalus had significantly earlier revisions than congenital and other etiologies. Programmable systems did not reduce the failure rate or the average number of shunts revisions.

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Nima Majlesi, Howard Greller and Mark Su

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Brian Willis, Vijayakumar Javalkar, Prasad Vannemreddy, Gloria Caldito, Junko Matsuyama, Bharat Guthikonda, Papireddy Bollam and Anil Nanda

Object

The aim of the study was to analyze the outcome of surgical treatment for posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus in premature infants.

Methods

From 1990 to 2006, 32 premature infants underwent surgical treatment for posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus, and their charts were retrospectively reviewed to analyze the complications and outcome with respect to shunt revisions. Multivariate analysis and time series were used to identify factors that influence the outcome in terms of shunt revisions.

Results

The mean gestational age was 27 ± 3.3 weeks, and mean birth weight was 1192 ± 660 g. Temporary reservoir placement was performed in 15 patients, while 17 underwent permanent CSF diversion with a ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt. In 2 patients, reservoir tapping alone was sufficient to halt the progression of hydrocephalus; 29 patients received VP shunts. The mean follow-up period was 37.3 months. The neonates who received VP shunts first were significantly older (p = 0.02) and heavier (p = 0.04) than those who initially underwent reservoir placement. Shunts were revised in 14 patients; 42% of patients in the reservoir group had their shunts revised, while 53% of infants who had initially received a VP shunt required a revision. The revision rate per patient in the reservoir group was half that in the direct VP shunt group (p = 0.027). No patient in the reservoir group had > 2 revisions. Shunt infections developed in 3 patients (10.3%), and 2 patients in the reservoir group died of nonneurological issues related to prematurity.

Conclusions

Birth weight and age are useful parameters in decision making. Preterm neonates with low birth weights benefit from initial CSF drainage procedures followed by permanent CSF diversion with respect to the number of shunt revisions.