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  • Author or Editor: Kristopher Kimmell x
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Tyler M. Schmidt, Ian A. DeAndrea-Lazarus, Kristopher T. Kimmell, G. Edward Vates, Stephen J. Haines and Webster H. Pilcher

The William P. Van Wagenen Fellowship, celebrating its 50th anniversary, is an annual award given by the AANS and administered by the Neurosurgery Research and Education Foundation (NREF). Named after its benefactor, Dr. William Van Wagenen, the fellowship continues his legacy of mentorship and innovation. As the premier research award for young neurosurgeons, it has provided a foundation for career development for many thought leaders in the field. The award was created in the spirit of Van Wagenen’s belief in collaboration with other institutions as a means of refining neurosurgical technique, creating new research initiatives, and improving patient outcomes. Van Wagenen’s commitment was informed by his early experiences in neurosurgery with his mentor Dr. Harvey Cushing, who helped to fund Van Wagenen’s scientific endeavors in Europe. This journey catalyzed Van Wagenen’s lifelong commitment to mentorship, which is exemplified by his instrumental role in the creation of the Harvey Cushing Society, now the AANS. Over the last 50 years, the recipients of this award have used the endowment to lay the groundwork for many scientific and technical innovations in neurosurgery. The fellowship remains an unmatched opportunity to explore new lines of investigation, foster academic and research goals, incorporate new technology and skills into American neurosurgical practice, and motivate young neurosurgeons to transform the field. The legacy of mentorship, scientific inquiry, and clinical excellence personified by Cushing and Van Wagenen is memorialized in the William P. Van Wagenen Fellowship.

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Tyler M. Schmidt, Ian A. DeAndrea-Lazarus, Kristopher T. Kimmell, G. Edward Vates, Stephen J. Haines and Webster H. Pilcher

The William P. Van Wagenen Fellowship, celebrating its 50th anniversary, is an annual award given by the AANS and administered by the Neurosurgery Research and Education Foundation (NREF). Named after its benefactor, Dr. William Van Wagenen, the fellowship continues his legacy of mentorship and innovation. As the premier research award for young neurosurgeons, it has provided a foundation for career development for many thought leaders in the field. The award was created in the spirit of Van Wagenen’s belief in collaboration with other institutions as a means of refining neurosurgical technique, creating new research initiatives, and improving patient outcomes. Van Wagenen’s commitment was informed by his early experiences in neurosurgery with his mentor Dr. Harvey Cushing, who helped to fund Van Wagenen’s scientific endeavors in Europe. This journey catalyzed Van Wagenen’s lifelong commitment to mentorship, which is exemplified by his instrumental role in the creation of the Harvey Cushing Society, now the AANS. Over the last 50 years, the recipients of this award have used the endowment to lay the groundwork for many scientific and technical innovations in neurosurgery. The fellowship remains an unmatched opportunity to explore new lines of investigation, foster academic and research goals, incorporate new technology and skills into American neurosurgical practice, and motivate young neurosurgeons to transform the field. The legacy of mentorship, scientific inquiry, and clinical excellence personified by Cushing and Van Wagenen is memorialized in the William P. Van Wagenen Fellowship.

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Keaton Piper, Hanna Algattas, Ian A. DeAndrea-Lazarus, Kristopher T. Kimmell, Yan Michael Li, Kevin A. Walter, Howard J. Silberstein and G. Edward Vates

OBJECTIVE

Patients undergoing spinal surgery are at risk for developing venous thromboembolism (VTE). The authors sought to identify risk factors for VTE in these patients.

METHODS

The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Project database for the years 2006–2010 was reviewed for patients who had undergone spinal surgery according to their primary Current Procedural Terminology code(s). Clinical factors were analyzed to identify associations with VTE.

RESULTS

Patients who underwent spinal surgery (n = 22,434) were identified. The rate of VTE in the cohort was 1.1% (pulmonary embolism 0.4%; deep vein thrombosis 0.8%). Multivariate binary logistic regression analysis revealed 13 factors associated with VTE. Preoperative factors included dependent functional status, paraplegia, quadriplegia, disseminated cancer, inpatient status, hypertension, history of transient ischemic attack, sepsis, and African American race. Operative factors included surgery duration > 4 hours, emergency presentation, and American Society of Anesthesiologists Class III–V, whereas postoperative sepsis was the only significant postoperative factor. A risk score was developed based on the number of factors present in each patient. Patients with a score of ≥ 7 had a 100-fold increased risk of developing VTE over patients with a score of 0. The receiver-operating-characteristic curve of the risk score generated an area under the curve of 0.756 (95% CI 0.726–0.787).

CONCLUSIONS

A risk score based on race, preoperative comorbidities, and operative characteristics of patients undergoing spinal surgery predicts the postoperative VTE rate. Many of these risks can be identified before surgery. Future protocols should focus on VTE prevention in patients who are predisposed to it.