Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 13 items for :

  • "animal model" x
  • By Author: Tubbs, R. Shane x
Clear All
Restricted access

R. Shane Tubbs and W. Jerry Oakes

-mutilation may be found. Patients with this rare symptom should be evaluated for tethered cord syndrome. Abbreviation used in this paper MR = magnetic resonance . References 1. Albe-Fessard D , Giamberardino MA , Rampin O : Comparison of different animal models of chronic pain. Adv Pain Res Ther 13 : 11 – 27 , 1990 Albe-Fessard D, Giamberardino MA, Rampin O: Comparison of different animal models of chronic pain. Adv Pain Res Ther 13: 11–27, 1990 2. Bowsher D : Human “autotomy

Restricted access

R. Shane Tubbs and W. Jerry Oakes

-mutilation may be found. Patients with this rare symptom should be evaluated for tethered cord syndrome. References 1. Albe-Fessard D , Giamberardino MA , Rampin O : Comparison of different animal models of chronic pain. Adv Pain Res Ther 13 : 11 – 27 , 1990 Albe-Fessard D, Giamberardino MA, Rampin O: Comparison of different animal models of chronic pain. Adv Pain Res Ther 13: 11–27, 1990 2. Bowsher D : Human “autotomy”. Pain 95 : 187 – 189 , 2002 Bowsher D: Human “autotomy”. Pain 95

Restricted access

R. Shane Tubbs, Marios Loukas, Mohammadali M. Shoja, John C. Wellons and Aaron A. Cohen-Gadol

P revious studies have proven that cadaveric human and cadaveric and live animal models can improve medical and surgical trainee competence for performing various invasive procedures. 2 , 3 , 7 To this end, some have strongly recommended training via cadaveric dissection prior to intracranial endoscopy. 5 , 8 As complications of neuroendoscopy may reach up to 20%, such training is reasonable, especially for the novice. 4 , 8 Unfortunately, good human models for practicing intraventricular endoscopy are scant. This is due to the collapse of the ventricular

Restricted access

R. Shane Tubbs, Martin M. Mortazavi, Marios Loukas, Mohammadali M. Shoja and Aaron A. Cohen-Gadol

found that stimulation of the glossopharyngeal nerve gives results comparable to those of vagus nerve stimulation in aborting seizures in an animal model. 8 Such findings lend credence to alternative pathways to the nucleus tractus solitarius via glossopharyngeal nerve to vagus nerve connections. The intrancranial intracisternal interconnections between the glossopharyngeal and vagus nerves described herein may be more common than previously described because such small connections among intracisternal segments of the cranial nerves may be underappreciated and

Restricted access

R. Shane Tubbs, Cuong J. Bui, William C. Rice, Marios Loukas, Robert P. Naftel, Michael Paul Holcombe and W. Jerry Oakes

such traction from below.” However, regarding hindbrain herniation and myelomeningocele, Goldstein and Kepes 9 have found in an animal model that distal distraction of the spinal cord is dissipated over three to four spinal segments. In contrast, in a cadaveric study of the denticulate ligaments, we found that distal traction of the spinal cord resulted in movement of the cranially located cord near the cervicothoracic junction following transection of all denticulate ligaments. 20 Royo-Salvador et al. 17 have described three patients with CM-I, two of whom also

Restricted access

Sharad Rajpal, M. Shahriar Salamat, R. Shane Tubbs, David R. Kelly, W. Jerry Oakes and Bermans J. Iskandar

through secondary neurulation, which includes the processes of canalization and caudal regression. Many of the details of these two processes are based on animal studies but, because they are species-specific, translate into assumed human embryology. There is overlap between the various embryological stages, and it is likely that there are common mechanisms between human and animal models that can provide some degree of explanation for developmental disorders. Several key embryological tenets are essential in the investigation of congenital malformations: 1

Restricted access

R. Shane Tubbs, Ake Hansasuta, William Stetler, David R. Kelly, Danitra Blevins, Rita Humphrey, Gina D. Chua, Mohammadali M. Shoja, Marios Loukas and W. Jerry Oakes

demonstrate that spinal arachnoid villi exist and that these structures have an intimate relationship with vicinal radicular veins. Further studies with animal models designed to trace CSF absorption from the isolated spinal subarachnoid space are necessary. References 1 Alksne JF , Lovings ET : Functional ultrastructure of the arachnoid villus . Arch Neurol 27 : 371 – 377 , 1972 2 Bergmann L : Studies of the blood vessels of the human Gasserian ganglion . Anat Rec 82 : 609 – 629 , 1942 3 Brierley JB , Field EJ : The connexions of the spinal

Restricted access

R. Shane Tubbs, Cheryl R. Killingsworth, Dennis L. Rollins, William M. Smith, Raymond E. Ideker, John C. Wellons III, Jeffrey P. Blount and W. Jerry Oakes

Positron emission tomography experiments have been used to study regional cerebral blood flow following vagus nerve stimulation. 9 Alteration of blood flow following vagus nerve stimulation has been reported in the cerebellum, thalamus, temporal lobe, insular lobe, and postcentral gyrus. 13 Differences in stimulation parameters and individual patient variation may account for the variable regions that demonstrate increased regional cerebral blood flow. 17 Right and left vagus nerve stimulation is equally effective in controlling brain seizures in animal models

Restricted access

R. Shane Tubbs, Cheryl R. Killingsworth, Dennis L. Rollins, William M. Smith, Raymond E. Ideker, John C. Wellons III, Jeffrey P. Blount and W. Jerry Oakes

Positron emission tomography experiments have been used to study regional cerebral blood flow following vagus nerve stimulation. 9 Alteration of blood flow following vagus nerve stimulation has been reported in the cerebellum, thalamus, temporal lobe, insular lobe, and postcentral gyrus. 13 Differences in stimulation parameters and individual patient variation may account for the variable regions that demonstrate increased regional cerebral blood flow. 17 Right and left vagus nerve stimulation is equally effective in controlling brain seizures in animal models