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  • Author or Editor: Naoki Ishiguro x
  • By Author: Tauchi, Ryoji x
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Shiro Imagama, Yukihiro Matsuyama, Yoshihito Sakai, Hiroshi Nakamura, Yoshito Katayama, Zenya Ito, Norimitsu Wakao, Koji Sato, Mitsuhiro Kamiya, Fumihiko Kato, Yasutsugu Yukawa, Yasushi Miura, Hisatake Yoshihara, Kazuhiro Suzuki, Kei Ando, Kenichi Hirano, Ryoji Tauchi, Akio Muramoto and Naoki Ishiguro

Object

The purpose of this study was to provide the first evidence for image classification of idiopathic spinal cord herniation (ISCH) in a multicenter study.

Methods

Twelve patients who underwent surgery for ISCH were identified, and preoperative symptoms, severity of paralysis and myelopathy, disease duration, plain radiographs, MR imaging and CT myelography findings, surgical procedure, intraoperative findings, data from spinal cord monitoring, and postoperative recovery were investigated in these patients. Findings on sagittal MR imaging and CT myelography were classified into 3 types: a kink type (Type K), a discontinuous type (Type D), and a protrusion type (Type P). Using axial images, the location of the hiatus was classified as either central (Type C) or lateral (Type L), and the laterality of the herniated spinal cord was classified based on correspondence (same; Type S) or noncorrespondence (opposite; Type O) with the hiatus location. A bone defect at the ISCH site and the laterality of the defect were also noted.

Results

Patients with Type P herniation had a good postoperative recovery, and those with a Type C location had significant severe preoperative lower-extremity paralysis and a significantly poor postoperative recovery. Patients with a bone defect had a significantly severe preoperative myelopathy, but showed no difference in postoperative recovery.

Conclusions

The authors' results showed that a Type C classification and a bone defect have strong relationships with severity of symptoms and surgical outcome and are important imaging and clinical features for ISCH. These findings may allow surgeons to determine the severity of preoperative symptoms and the probable surgical outcome from imaging.

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Kei Ando, Shiro Imagama, Norimitsu Wakao, Kenichi Hirano, Ryoji Tauchi, Akio Muramoto, Fumihiko Kato, Yasutsugu Yukawa, Noriaki Kawakami, Koji Sato, Yuji Matsubara, Tokumi Kanemura, Yukihiro Matsuyama and Naoki Ishiguro

Object

The purpose of this study was to provide the first evidence for the influence of an ossified anterior longitudinal ligament (OALL) on the clinical features and surgical outcomes in an ossified ligamentum flavum (OLF) in the thoracic region.

Methods

Sixty-three patients who underwent surgery for a 1-level thoracic OLF were identified, and preoperative symptoms, severity of symptoms and myelopathy, disease duration, MR imaging and CT findings, surgical procedure, intraoperative findings, complications, and postoperative recovery were investigated in these patients. Entities of OALLs were found on sagittal CT images to be adjacent to or at the same vertebral level as the OLF were classified into 4 types: no discernible type (Type N), one-sided (Type O), discontinuous (Type D), and continuous (Type C).

Results

The duration of symptoms was especially long for Types D and C OALLs. Patients with Type D OALLs had a significantly worse percentage of recovery, as well as worse preoperative JOA scores.

Conclusions

The authors' results showed that a Type D OALL had strong associations with preoperative severity of symptoms and surgical outcomes. These findings may allow surgeons to determine the severity of preoperative symptoms and the probable surgical outcomes from the OALL classifications. Moreover, surgery with instrumentation for Type D OALLs may produce better surgical outcomes.

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Zenya Ito, Shiro Imagama, Yoshihito Sakai, Yoshito Katayama, Norimitsu Wakao, Kei Ando, Kenichi Hirano, Ryoji Tauchi, Akio Muramoto, Hany El Zahlawy, Yukihiro Matsuyama and Naoki Ishiguro

Object

The purpose of this study was to review the present criteria for the compound muscle action potential (CMAP) alert and for safe spinal surgery.

Methods

The authors conducted a retrospective study of 295 patients in whom spinal cord monitoring had been performed during spinal surgery. The waveforms observed during spinal surgery were divided into the following 4 grades: Grade 0, normal; Grade 1, amplitude decrease of 50% or more and latency delay of 10% or more; Grade 2, multiphase pattern; and Grade 3, loss of amplitude. Waveform grading, its relationship with postoperative motor deficit, and CMAP sensitivity and specificity were analyzed. Whenever any wave abnormality occurred, the surgeon was notified and the surgical procedures were temporarily suspended. If no improvements were seen, the surgery was terminated.

Results

Compound muscle action potential wave changes occurred in 38.6% of cases. With Grade 1 or 2 changes, no paresis was detected. Postoperative motor deficits were seen in 8 patients, all with Grade 3 waveform changes. Among the 287 patients without postoperative motor deficits, CMAP changes were not seen in 181, with a specificity of 63%. The false-positive rate was 37% (106 of 287). However, when a Grade 2 change was set as the alarm point, sensitivity was 100% and specificity was 79.4%. The false-positive rate was 20% (59 of 295).

Conclusions

Neither the Grade 1 nor the Grade 2 groups included patients who demonstrated a motor deficit. All pareses occurred in cases showing a Grade 3 change. Therefore, the authors propose a Grade 2 change (multiphasic waveform) as a new alarm point. With the application of this criterion, the false-positive rate can be reduced to 20%.

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Ryoji Tauchi, Shiro Imagama, Hidefumi Inoh, Yasutsugu Yukawa, Tokumi Kanemura, Koji Sato, Yoshihito Sakai, Mitsuhiro Kamiya, Hisatake Yoshihara, Zenya Ito, Kei Ando, Akio Muramoto, Hiroki Matsui, Tomohiro Matsumoto, Junichi Ukai, Kazuyoshi Kobayashi, Ryuichi Shinjo, Hiroaki Nakashima, Masayoshi Morozumi and Naoki Ishiguro

Object

Cervical spondylosis that causes upper-extremity muscle atrophy without gait disturbance is called cervical spondylotic amyotrophy (CSA). The distal type of CSA is characterized by weakness of the hand muscles. In this retrospective analysis, the authors describe the clinical features of the distal type of CSA and evaluate the results of surgical treatment.

Methods

The authors performed a retrospective review of 17 consecutive cases involving 16 men and 1 woman (mean age 56.3 years) who underwent surgical treatment for the distal type of CSA. The condition was diagnosed on the basis of cervical spondylosis in the presence of muscle impairment of the upper extremity (intrinsic muscle and/or finger extension muscles) without gait disturbance, and the presence of a compressive lesion involving the anterior horn of the spinal cord, the nerve root at the foramen, or both sites as seen on axial and sagittal views of MRI or CT myelography. The authors assessed spinal cord or nerve root impingement by MRI or CT myelography and evaluated surgical outcomes.

Results

The preoperative duration of symptoms averaged 11.8 months. There were 14 patients with impingement of the anterior horn of the spinal cord and 3 patients with both anterior horn and nerve root impingement. Twelve patients were treated with laminoplasty (plus foraminotomy in 1 case), 3 patients were treated with anterior cervical discectomy and fusion, and 2 patients were treated with posterior spinal fixation. The mean manual muscle testing grade was 2.4 (range 1–4) preoperatively and 3.4 (range 1–5) postoperatively. The surgical results were excellent in 7 patients, good in 2, and fair in 8.

Conclusions

Most of the patients in this series of cases of the distal type of CSA suffered from impingement of the anterior horn of the spinal cord, and surgical outcome was fair in about half of the cases.