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  • Author or Editor: Kazuhiko Sugiyama x
  • By Author: Takayasu, Takeshi x
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Fumiyuki Yamasaki, Takeshi Takayasu, Ryo Nosaka, Vishwa Jeet Amatya, Aidos Doskaliyev, Yuji Akiyama, Atsushi Tominaga, Yukio Takeshima, Kazuhiko Sugiyama and Kaoru Kurisu

OBJECT

The differentiation of malignant lymphomas from gliomas or malignant gliomas by conventional MRI can be difficult. The authors studied Gd-enhanced MR images to obtain a differential diagnosis between malignant lymphomas and gliomas without central necrosis or cystic changes and investigated the diagnostic value of single-voxel proton MR spectroscopy (1H-MRS) using different parameters, including lipid levels.

METHODS

This was a retrospective study of patients with primary malignant CNS lymphoma (n = 17) and glioma (n = 122 [Grades I, II, III, and IV in 10, 30, 33, and 49 patients, respectively]) who were treated between 2007 and 2013. The authors focused on 15 patients with homogeneously enhanced primary malignant CNS lymphomas and 7 homogeneously enhanced gliomas. Images of all the included tumors were acquired with 1H-MRS at 3 T, and the diagnoses were histologically confirmed.

RESULTS

Using a short echo time 1H-MRS, large lipid peaks were observed in all 17 patients with a malignant lymphoma, in 39 patients (79.6%) with a Grade IV glioma, and in 10 patients (30.3%) with a Grade III glioma. A focus on homogeneously enhanced tumors revealed large lipid peaks in 15 malignant lymphomas that were free of central necrosis on Gd-enhanced T1-weighted images. Conversely, in the 7 homogeneously enhanced gliomas (glioblastoma and anaplastic astrocytoma, n = 2 each; anaplastic oligodendroglioma, diffuse astrocytoma, and pilomyxoid astrocytoma, n = 1 each), lipid peaks were small or absent.

CONCLUSIONS

Large lipid peaks on 1H-MRS images of tumors without central necrosis were characteristic of malignant lymphomas. Conversely, small or absent lipid peaks in intraaxial tumors without central necrosis were strongly suggestive of glioma.

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Taiichi Saito, Kazuhiko Sugiyama, Yukio Takeshima, Vishwa Jeet Amatya, Fumiyuki Yamasaki, Takeshi Takayasu, Ryo Nosaka, Yoshihiro Muragaki, Takakazu Kawamata and Kaoru Kurisu

OBJECTIVE

Currently, the standard treatment protocol for patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma (GBM) includes surgery, radiotherapy, and concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide (TMZ). Various prognostic biomarkers for GBM have been described, including survivin expression. The aim of this study was to determine whether the subcellular localization of survivin correlates with GBM prognosis in patients who received the standard treatment protocol.

METHODS

The authors retrospectively examined the subcellular localization of survivin (nuclear, cytoplasmic, or both) using immunohistochemistry in 50 patients with GBM who had received the standard treatment. The relationship between survivin localization and overall survival (OS) was assessed with uni- and multivariate analyses including other clinicopathological factors (age, sex, Karnofsky Performance Scale [KPS] score, extent of resection, the use of second-line bevacizumab, O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase [MGMT] status, and MIB-1 labeling index).

RESULTS

Log-rank tests revealed that patient age, KPS score, extent of resection, MGMT status, and survivin localization (p < 0.0001) significantly correlated with OS. Multivariate analysis indicated that patient age, MGMT status, and survivin localization significantly correlated with OS. Patients with nuclear localization of survivin had a significantly shorter OS than those in whom survivin expression was exclusively cytoplasmic (median OS 19.5 vs 31.7 months, respectively, HR 5.690, 95% CI 2.068–17.612, p = 0.0006). There was no significant difference in OS between patents whose survivin expression was exclusively nuclear or nuclear/cytoplasmic.

CONCLUSIONS

Nuclear expression of survivin is a factor for a poor prognosis in GBM patients. Subcellular localization of survivin can help to predict OS in GBM patients treated with the standard protocol.

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Manish Kolakshyapati, Rupendra B. Adhikari, Vega Karlowee, Takeshi Takayasu, Ryo Nosaka, Vishwa J. Amatya, Yukio Takeshima, Yuji Akiyama, Kazuhiko Sugiyama, Kaoru Kurisu and Fumiyuki Yamasaki

OBJECTIVE

Glioblastoma differentials include intracranial tumors, like malignant lymphomas and metastatic brain tumors with indiscernible radiological characteristics. The purpose of this study was to identify a distinct radiological feature for the preoperative differentiation of glioblastoma from its differentials, which include malignant lymphomas and metastatic brain tumors.

METHODS

Preoperative MR images, including diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) studies (b = 1000 and 4000 sec/mm2), obtained in patients with newly diagnosed malignant tumor, were analyzed retrospectively after receiving approval from the institutional review board. Sixty-four patients with histologically confirmed glioblastoma, 32 patients with malignant lymphoma, and 46 patients with brain metastases were included. The presence of a nonenhancing peritumoral DWI high lesion (NePDHL, i.e., hyperintense lesion in a nonenhancing peritumoral area on DWI) was confirmed in both DWI sequences. Gray matter lesions were excluded. Lesions were termed “definite” if present within 3 cm of the hyperintense tumor border with a signal intensity ratio ≥ 30% when compared with the contralateral normal white matter in both sequences. Discriminant analysis between the histological diagnosis and the presence of Definite-NePDHL was performed, as well as Kaplan-Meier survival analysis incorporating the existence of Definite-NePDHL.

RESULTS

In 25% of glioblastoma patients, Definite-NePDHL was present, while it was conspicuously absent in patients with malignant lymphoma and metastatic brain tumors. The specificity and positive predictive value were 100%. In the glioblastoma subset, a higher preoperative Karnofsky Performance Scale score (p = 0.0028), high recursive partitioning analysis class (p = 0.0006), and total surgical removal (p = 0.0012) were associated with better median overall survival. Patients with Definite-NePDHL had significantly early local (p = 0.0467) and distant/dissemination recurrence (p < 0.0001) and poor prognosis (p = 0.0007).

CONCLUSIONS

The presence of Definite-NePDHL is very specific for glioblastoma and indicates poor prognosis. Definite-NePDHL is a significant indicator of early local and distant/dissemination recurrence in patients with glioblastoma. Studying peritumoral DWI and high–b-value DWI is useful for tumor differentiation.