Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 2 of 2 items for

  • Author or Editor: Samuel J. Hassenbusch x
  • By Author: Shiu, Almon x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Ajay K. Bindal, Rajesh K. Bindal, Kenneth R. Hess, Almon Shiu, Samuel J. Hassenbusch, Wei Ming Shi and Raymond Sawaya

✓ Surgery and radiosurgery are effective treatment modalities for brain metastasis. To compare the results of these treatment modalities, the authors followed 31 patients treated by radiosurgery and 62 patients treated by surgery who were retrospectively matched. Patients were matched according to the following criteria: histological characteristics of the primary tumor, extent of systemic disease, preoperative Karnofsky Performance Scale score, time to brain metastasis, number of brain metastases, and patient age and sex. For patients treated by radiosurgery, the median size of the treated lesion was 1.96 cm3 (range 0.41–8.25 cm3) and the median dose was 20 Gy (range 12–22 Gy). The median survival was 7.5 months for patients treated by radiosurgery and 16.4 months for those treated by surgery; this difference was found to be statistically significant using both univariate (p = 0.0018) and multivariate (p = 0.0009) analyses. The difference in survival was due to a higher rate of mortality from brain metastasis in the radiosurgery group than in the surgery group (p < 0.0001) and not due to a difference in the rate of death from systemic disease (p = 0.28). Log-rank analysis showed that the higher mortality rate found in the radiosurgery group was due to a greater progression rate of the radiosurgically treated lesions (p = 0.0001) and not due to the development of new brain metastasis (p = 0.75).

On the basis of their data, the authors conclude that surgery is superior to radiosurgery in the treatment of brain metastasis. Patients who undergo surgical treatment survive longer and have a better local control. The data lead the authors to suggest that the indications for radiosurgery should be limited to surgically inaccessible metastatic tumors or patients in poor medical condition. Surgery should remain the treatment of choice whenever possible.

Restricted access

Anita Mahajan, Ian E. McCutcheon, Dima Suki, Eric L. Chang, Samuel J. Hassenbusch, Jeffrey S. Weinberg, Almon Shiu, Moshe H. Maor and Shiao Y. Woo

Object. The role of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) was evaluated in a case—control study.

Methods. All patients who underwent SRS for recurrent GBM before March 2003 formed the case group. A control group of patients who did not undergo SRS was created from an institutional database, and each case was matched for known prognostic factors in GBM. The medical and neuroimaging records of all the patients were reviewed, and survival and treatment outcomes were recorded.

The case and control groups were well matched with regard to demographics and pre-SRS interventions. In the control group, the date on which magnetic resonance imaging identified a recurrent lesion that would have been eligible for SRS was deemed the “SRS” date. The number of surgeries performed in the control group was statistically higher than that in the case group. The median duration of overall survival from diagnosis was 26 months in the case group and 23 months in the control group. From the date of SRS or “SRS”, the median duration of survival was 11 months in the case group and 10 months in the control group, a difference that was not statistically significant.

Conclusions. It appears that a subgroup of patients with GBMs has a higher than expected median survival duration despite the initial prognostic factors. In patients with localized recurrences, survival may be prolonged by applying aggressive local disease management by using either SRS or resection to equal advantage.