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Oral Presentations

2010 AANS Annual Meeting Philadelphia, Pennsylvania May 1–5, 2010

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Robert M. Starke, James H. Nguyen, Jessica Rainey, Brian J. Williams, Jonathan H. Sherman, Jesse Savage, Chun Po Yen and Jason P. Sheehan

Object

Although numerous studies have analyzed the role of stereotactic radiosurgery for intracranial meningiomas, few studies have assessed outcomes of posterior fossa meningiomas after stereotactic radiosurgery. In this study, the authors evaluate the outcomes of posterior fossa meningiomas treated with Gamma Knife surgery (GKS). The authors also assess factors predictive of new postoperative neurological deficits and tumor progression.

Methods

A retrospective review was performed of a prospectively compiled database documenting the outcomes of 152 patients with posterior fossa meningiomas treated at the University of Virginia from 1990 to 2006. All patients had a minimum follow-up of 24 months. There were 30 males and 122 females, with a median age of 58 years (range 12–82 years). Seventy-five patients were treated with radiosurgery initially, and 77 patients were treated with GKS after resection. Patients were assessed clinically and radiographically at routine intervals following GKS. Factors predictive of new neurological deficit following GKS were assessed via univariate and multivariate analysis, and Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox multivariate regression analysis were used to assess factors predictive of tumor progression.

Results

Patients had meningiomas centered over the tentorium (35 patients, 23%), cerebellopontine angle (43 patients, 28%), petroclival region (28 patients, 18%), petrous region (6 patients, 4%), and clivus (40 patients, 26%). The median follow-up was 7 years (range 2–16 years). The mean preradiosurgical tumor volume was 5.7 cm3 (range 0.3–33 cm3), and mean postradiosurgical tumor volume was 4.9 cm3 (range 0.1–33 cm3). At last follow-up, 55 patients (36%) displayed no change in tumor volume, 78 (51%) displayed a decrease in volume, and 19 (13%) displayed an increase in volume. Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated radiographic progression-free survival at 3, 5, and 10 years to be 98%, 96%, and 78%, respectively. In Cox multivariable analysis, pre-GKS covariates associated with tumor progression included age greater than 65 years (hazard ratio [HR] 3.24, 95% CI 1.12–9.37; p = 0.03) and a low dose to the tumor margin (HR 0.76, 95% CI 0.60–0.97; p = 0.03), and post-GKS covariates included shunt-dependent hydrocephalus (HR 25.0, 95% CI 3.72–100.0; p = 0.001). At last clinical follow-up, 139 patients (91%) demonstrated no change or improvement in their neurological condition, and 13 patients showed symptom deterioration (9%). In multivariate analysis, the only factors predictive of new or worsening symptoms were clival or petrous location (OR 4.0, 95% CI 1.1–13.7; p = 0.03).

Conclusions

Gamma Knife surgery offers an acceptable rate of tumor control for posterior fossa meningiomas and accomplishes this with a low incidence of neurological deficits. In patients selected for GKS, tumor progression is associated with age greater than 65 years and decreasing dose to the tumor margin. Clival- or petrous-based locations are predictive of an increased risk of new or worsening neurological deficit following GKS.

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Brian J. Williams, Chun Po Yen, Robert M. Starke, Bhuvaneswara Basina, James Nguyen, Jessica Rainey, Jonathan H. Sherman, David Schlesinger and Jason P. Sheehan

Object

Stereotactic radiosurgery serves as an important primary and adjuvant treatment option for patients with many types of intracranial meningiomas. This is particularly true for patients with parasellar meningiomas. In this study, the authors evaluated the outcomes of Gamma Knife surgery (GKS) used to treat parasellar meningiomas.

Methods

The study is a retrospective review of the outcomes in 138 patients with meningiomas treated at the University of Virginia from 1989 to 2006; all patients had a minimum follow-up of 24 months. There were 31 men and 107 women whose mean age was 54 years (range 19–85 years). Eighty-four patients had previously undergone resection. The mean pre-GKS tumor volume was 7.5 ml (range 0.2–54.8 ml). Clinical and radiographic evaluations were performed, and factors related to favorable outcomes in each case were assessed.

Results

The mean follow-up duration was 84 months (median 75.5 months, range 24–216 months). In 118 patients (86%), the tumor volume was unchanged or had decreased at last follow-up. Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated radiographic progression-free survival at 5 and 10 years to be 95.4% and 69%, respectively. Fourteen patients (10%) developed new cranial nerve palsies following GKS. Factors associated with tumor control included younger age, a higher isodose, and smaller tumor volume. A longer follow-up duration was associated with either a decrease or increase in tumor volume. Fourteen patients (10%) experienced new or worsening cranial nerve deficits after treatment. Factors associated with this occurrence were larger pretreatment tumor volume, lower peripheral radiation dose, lower maximum dose, tumor progression, and longer follow-up.

Conclusions

Gamma Knife surgery offers an acceptable rate of tumor control for parasellar meningiomas and accomplishes this with a low incidence of neurological deficits. Radiological control after radiosurgery is more likely in those patients with a smaller tumor volume and a higher prescription dose.

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Robert M. Starke, Brian J. Williams, Claire Hiles, James H. Nguyen, Mohamed Y. Elsharkawy and Jason P. Sheehan

Object

Skull base meningiomas are challenging tumors owing in part to their close proximity to important neurovascular structures. Complete microsurgical resection can be associated with significant morbidity, and recurrence rates are not inconsequential. In this study, the authors evaluate the outcomes of skull base meningiomas treated with Gamma Knife surgery (GKS) both as an adjunct to microsurgery and as a primary treatment modality.

Methods

The authors performed a retrospective review of a prospectively compiled database detailing the outcomes in 255 patients with skull base meningiomas treated at the University of Virginia from 1989 to 2006. All patients had a minimum follow-up of 24 months. The group comprised 54 male and 201 female patients, with a median age of 55 years (range 19–85 years). One hundred nine patients were treated with upfront radiosurgery, and 146 patients were treated with GKS following resection. Patients were assessed clinically and radiographically at routine intervals following GKS. Factors predictive of new neurological deficit following GKS were assessed via univariate and multivariate analysis, and Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox multivariate regression analysis were used to assess factors predictive of tumor progression.

Results

Meningiomas were centered over the cerebellopontine angle in 43 patients (17%), the clivus in 40 (16%), the petroclival region in 28 (11%), the petrous region in 6 (2%), and the parasellar region in 138 (54%). The median duration of follow-up was 6.5 years (range 2–18 years). The mean preradiosurgery tumor volume was 5.0 cm3 (range 0.3–54.8 cm3).

At most recent follow-up, 220 patients (86%) displayed either no change or a decrease in tumor volume, and 35 (14%) displayed an increase in volume. Actuarial progression-free survival at 3, 5, and 10 years was 99%, 96%, and 79%, respectively. In Cox multivariate analysis, pre-GKS covariates associated with tumor progression included age greater then 65 years (HR 3.41, 95% CI 1.63–7.13, p = 0.001) and decreasing dose to tumor margin (HR 0.90, 95% CI 0.80–1.00, p = 0.05).

At most recent clinical follow-up, 230 patients (90%) demonstrated no change or improvement in their neurological condition and the condition of 25 patients had deteriorated (10%). In multivariate analysis, the factors predictive of new or worsening symptoms were increasing duration of follow-up (OR 1.01, 95% CI 1.00–1.02, p = 0.015), tumor progression (OR 2.91, 95% CI 1.60–5.31, p < 0.001), decreasing maximum dose (OR 0.90, 95% CI 0.84–0.97, p = 0.007), and petrous or clival location versus parasellar, petroclival, and cerebellopontine angle location (OR 3.47, 95% CI 1.23–9.74, p = 0.018).

Conclusions

Stereotactic radiosurgery offers a high rate of tumor control and neurological preservation in patients with skull base meningiomas. After radiosurgery, better outcomes were observed for those receiving an optimal radiosurgery dose and harboring tumors located in a cerebellopontine angle, parasellar, or petroclival location.

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Robert M. Starke, Brian J. Williams, John A. Jane Jr. and Jason P. Sheehan

Object

Nonfunctioning pituitary macroadenomas often recur after microsurgery and thereby require further treatment. Gamma Knife surgery (GKS) has been used to treat recurrent adenomas. In this study, the authors evaluated outcomes following GKS of nonfunctioning pituitary macroadenomas and assessed predictors of tumor control, neurological deficits, and delayed hypopituitarism.

Methods

Between June 1989 and March 2010, 140 consecutive patients with nonfunctioning pituitary macroadenomas were treated using GKS at the University of Virginia. The median patient age was 51 years (range 21–82 years), and 56% of patients were male. Mean tumor volume was 5.6 cm3 (range 0.6–35 cm3). Thirteen patients were treated with GKS as primary therapy, and 127 had undergone at least 1 open resection prior to GKS. Ninety-three patients had a history of hormone therapy prior to GKS. The mean maximal dose of GKS was 38.6 Gy (range 10–70 Gy), the mean marginal dose was 18 Gy (range 5–25 Gy), and the mean number of isocenters was 9.8 (range 1–26). Follow-up evaluations were performed in all 140 patients, ranging from 0.5 to 17 years (mean 5 years, median 4.2 years).

Results

Tumor volume remained stable or decreased in 113 (90%) of 125 patients with available follow-up imaging. Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated radiographic progression free survival at 2, 5, 8, and 10 years to be 98%, 97%, 91%, and 87%, respectively. In multivariate analysis, a tumor volume greater than 5 cm3 (hazard ratio = 5.0, 95% CI 1.5–17.2; p = 0.023) was the only factor predictive of tumor growth. The median time to tumor progression was 14.5 years. Delayed hypopituitarism occurred in 30.3% of patients. No factor was predictive of post-GKS hypopituitarism. A new or worsening cranial nerve deficit occurred in 16 (13.7%) of 117 patients. Visual decline was the most common neurological deficit (12.8%), and all patients experiencing visual decline had evidence of tumor progression. In multivariate analysis, a tumor volume greater than 5 cm3 (OR = 3.7, 95% CI 1.2–11.7; p = 0.025) and pre-GKS hypopituitarism (OR = 7.5, 95% CI 1.1–60.8; p = 0.05) were predictive of a new or worsened neurological deficit.

Conclusions

In patients with nonfunctioning pituitary macroadenomas, GKS confers a high rate of tumor control and a low rate of neurological deficits. The most common complication following GKS is delayed hypopituitarism, and this occurs in a minority of patients.

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Dale Ding, Chun-Po Yen, Zhiyuan Xu, Robert M. Starke and Jason P. Sheehan

Object

The appropriate management of unruptured intracranial arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) remains controversial. In the present study, the authors evaluate the radiographic and clinical outcomes of radiosurgery for a large cohort of patients with unruptured AVMs.

Methods

From a prospective database of 1204 cases of AVMs involving patients treated with radiosurgery at their institution, the authors identified 444 patients without evidence of rupture prior to radiosurgery. The patients' mean age was 36.9 years, and 50% were male. The mean AVM nidus volume was 4.2 cm3, 13.5% of the AVMs were in a deep location, and 44.4% were at least Spetzler-Martin Grade III. The median radiosurgical prescription dose was 20 Gy. Univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses were used to determine risk factors associated with obliteration, postradiosurgery hemorrhage, radiation-induced changes, and postradiosurgery cyst formation. The mean duration of radiological and clinical follow-up was 76 months and 86 months, respectively.

Results

The cumulative AVM obliteration rate was 62%, and the postradiosurgery annual hemorrhage rate was 1.6%. Radiation-induced changes were symptomatic in 13.7% and permanent in 2.0% of patients. The statistically significant independent positive predictors of obliteration were no preradiosurgery embolization (p < 0.001), increased prescription dose (p < 0.001), single draining vein (p < 0.001), radiological presence of radiation-induced changes (p = 0.004), and lower Spetzler-Martin grade (p = 0.016). Increased volume and higher Pittsburgh radiosurgery-based AVM score were predictors of postradiosurgery hemorrhage in the univariate analysis only. Clinical deterioration occurred in 30 patients (6.8%), more commonly in patients with postradiosurgery hemorrhage (p = 0.018).

Conclusions

Radiosurgery afforded a reasonable chance of obliteration of unruptured AVMs with relatively low rates of clinical and radiological complications.

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Jason P. Sheehan, Robert M. Starke, David Mathieu, Byron Young, Penny K. Sneed, Veronica L. Chiang, John Y. K. Lee, Hideyuki Kano, Kyung-Jae Park, Ajay Niranjan, Douglas Kondziolka, Gene H. Barnett, Stephen Rush, John G. Golfinos and L. Dade Lunsford

Object

Pituitary adenomas are fairly common intracranial neoplasms, and nonfunctioning ones constitute a large subgroup of these adenomas. Complete resection is often difficult and may pose undue risk to neurological and endocrine function. Stereotactic radiosurgery has come to play an important role in the management of patients with nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas. This study examines the outcomes after radiosurgery in a large, multicenter patient population.

Methods

Under the auspices of the North American Gamma Knife Consortium, 9 Gamma Knife surgery (GKS) centers retrospectively combined their outcome data obtained in 512 patients with nonfunctional pituitary adenomas. Prior resection was performed in 479 patients (93.6%) and prior fractionated external-beam radiotherapy was performed in 34 patients (6.6%). The median age at the time of radiosurgery was 53 years. Fifty-eight percent of patients had some degree of hypopituitarism prior to radiosurgery. Patients received a median dose of 16 Gy to the tumor margin. The median follow-up was 36 months (range 1–223 months).

Results

Overall tumor control was achieved in 93.4% of patients at last follow-up; actuarial tumor control was 98%, 95%, 91%, and 85% at 3, 5, 8, and 10 years postradiosurgery, respectively. Smaller adenoma volume (OR 1.08 [95% CI 1.02–1.13], p = 0.006) and absence of suprasellar extension (OR 2.10 [95% CI 0.96–4.61], p = 0.064) were associated with progression-free tumor survival. New or worsened hypopituitarism after radiosurgery was noted in 21% of patients, with thyroid and cortisol deficiencies reported as the most common postradiosurgery endocrinopathies. History of prior radiation therapy and greater tumor margin doses were predictive of new or worsening endocrinopathy after GKS. New or progressive cranial nerve deficits were noted in 9% of patients; 6.6% had worsening or new onset optic nerve dysfunction. In multivariate analysis, decreasing age, increasing volume, history of prior radiation therapy, and history of prior pituitary axis deficiency were predictive of new or worsening cranial nerve dysfunction. No patient died as a result of tumor progression. Favorable outcomes of tumor control and neurological preservation were reflected in a 4-point radiosurgical pituitary score.

Conclusions

Gamma Knife surgery is an effective and well-tolerated management strategy for the vast majority of patients with recurrent or residual nonfunctional pituitary adenomas. Delayed hypopituitarism is the most common complication after radiosurgery. Neurological and cranial nerve function were preserved in more than 90% of patients after radiosurgery. The radiosurgical pituitary score may predict outcomes for future patients who undergo GKS for a nonfunctioning adenoma.

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Robert M. Starke, Chun-Po Yen, Dale Ding and Jason P. Sheehan

Object

The authors performed a study to review outcomes following Gamma Knife radiosurgery for cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) and to create a practical scale to predict long-term outcome.

Methods

Outcomes were reviewed in 1012 patients who were followed up for more than 2 years. Favorable outcome was defined as AVM obliteration and no posttreatment hemorrhage or permanent, symptomatic, radiation-induced complication. Preradiosurgery patient and AVM characteristics predictive of outcome in multivariate analysis were weighted according to their odds ratios to create the Virginia Radiosurgery AVM Scale.

Results

The mean follow-up time was 8 years (range 2–20 years). Arteriovenous malformation obliteration occurred in 69% of patients. Postradiosurgery hemorrhage occurred in 88 patients, for a yearly incidence of 1.14%. Radiation-induced changes occurred in 387 patients (38.2%), symptoms in 100 (9.9%), and permanent deficits in 21 (2.1%). Favorable outcome was achieved in 649 patients (64.1%). The Virginia Radiosurgery AVM Scale was created such that patients were assigned 1 point each for having an AVM volume of 2–4 cm3, eloquent AVM location, or a history of hemorrhage, and 2 points for having an AVM volume greater than 4 cm3. Eighty percent of patients who had a score of 0–1 points had a favorable outcome, as did 70% who had a score of 2 points and 45% who had a score of 3–4 points. The Virginia Radiosurgery AVM Scale was still predictive of outcome after controlling for predictive Gamma Knife radiosurgery treatment parameters, including peripheral dose and number of isocenters, in a multivariate analysis. The Spetzler-Martin grading scale and the Radiosurgery-Based Grading Scale predicted favorable outcome, but the Virginia Radiosurgery AVM Scale provided the best assessment.

Conclusions

Gamma Knife radiosurgery can be used to achieve long-term AVM obliteration and neurological preservation in a predictable fashion based on patient and AVM characteristics.

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Dale Ding, Robert M. Starke, John Hantzmon, Chun-Po Yen, Brian J. Williams and Jason P. Sheehan

Object

WHO Grade II and III intracranial meningiomas are uncommon, but they portend a significantly worse prognosis than their benign Grade I counterparts. The mainstay of current management is resection to obtain cytoreduction and histological tissue diagnosis. The timing and benefit of postoperative fractionated external beam radiation therapy and stereotactic radiosurgery remain controversial. The authors review the stereotactic radiosurgery outcomes for Grade II and III meningiomas.

Methods

A comprehensive literature search was performed using PubMed to identify all radiosurgery series reporting the treatment outcomes for Grade II and III meningiomas. Case reports and case series involving fewer than 10 patients were excluded.

Results

From 1998 to 2013, 19 radiosurgery series were published in which 647 Grade II and III meningiomas were treated. Median tumor volumes were 2.2–14.6 cm3. The median margin doses were 14–21 Gy, although generally the margin doses for Grade II meningiomas were 16–20 Gy and the margin doses for Grade III meningiomas were 18–22 Gy. The median 5-year PFS was 59% for Grade II tumors and 13% for Grade III tumors, which may have been affected by patient age, prior radiation therapy, tumor volume, and radiosurgical dose and timing. The median complication rate following radiosurgery was 8%.

Conclusions

The current data for radiosurgery suggest that it has a role in the management of residual or recurrent Grade II and III meningiomas. However, better studies are needed to fully define this role. Due to the relatively low prevalence of these tumors, it is unlikely that prospective studies will be feasible. As such, well-designed retrospective analyses may improve our understanding of the effect of radiosurgery on tumor recurrence and patient survival and the incidence and impact of treatment-induced complications.

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Gregory J. Zipfel and Roberto C. Heros