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  • Author or Editor: Mika Niemelä x
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Roberto C. Heros

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Anna Piippo, Aki Laakso, Karri Seppä, Jaakko Rinne, Juha E. Jääskeläinen, Juha Hernesniemi and Mika Niemelä

Object

The aim of this study was to assess the early and long-term excess mortality in patients with intracranial dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF) compared with a matched general Finnish population in an unselected, population-based series.

Methods

The authors identified 227 patients with DAVFs admitted to 2 of the 5 Departments of Neurosurgery in Finland—Helsinki and Kuopio University Hospitals—between 1944 and 2006. All patients were followed until death or the end of 2009. Long-term excess mortality was estimated using the relative survival ratio compared with the general Finnish population matched by age, sex, and calendar year.

Results

The median follow-up period was 10 years (range 0–44 years). Two-thirds (67%) of the DAVFs were located in the region of transverse and sigmoid sinuses. Cortical venous drainage (CVD) was present in 28% of the DAVFs (18% transverse and sigmoid sinus, 42% others). Of the 61 deaths counted, 11 (18%) were during the first 12 months and were mainly caused by treatment complications (5 of 11, 45%). The 1-year survivors presenting with hemorrhage experienced excess mortality until 7 years from admission. However, DAVFs with CVD were associated with significant, continuous excess mortality. There were more cerebrovascular and cardiovascular deaths in this group of patients than expected in the general Finnish population. Location other than transverse and sigmoid sinuses was also associated with excess mortality.

Conclusions

In the patients with DAVF there was excess mortality during the first 12 months, mainly due to treatment complications. Thereafter, their overall long-term survival became similar to that of the matched general population. However, DAVFs with CVD and those located in regions other than transverse and sigmoid sinuses were associated with marked long-term excess mortality after the first 12 months.

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Anna Piippo, Mika Niemelä, Jouke van Popta, Marko Kangasniemi, Jaakko Rinne, Juha E. Jääskeläinen and Juha Hernesniemi

Object

Management of dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVFs) has changed during the last decades due to increased knowledge of their pathophysiology and natural history as well as advances in treatment modalities. The authors describe the characteristics and long-term outcome of a large consecutive series of patients with DAVFs.

Methods

Altogether 251 patients with 261 DAVFs were treated in 2 of the 5 neurosurgery departments at Helsinki and Kuopio University Hospitals between 1944 and 2006. Clinical data and radiological examinations were reviewed to assess patients' overall long-term clinical outcome.

Results

The detection rate of DAVFs increased markedly in the 1970s and again in the 1990s when digital subtraction angiography was introduced. The incidence of DAVFs in a defined southern Finnish population was 0.51 per 100,000 individuals per year, which represents 32% of all the brain arteriovenous malformations. In the early part of the series, DAVFs were treated by proximal ligation of the feeding arteries. Later, most of the patients underwent preoperative embolization and subsequent craniotomy, and since 2000 stereotactic radiosurgery has been increasingly used in the treatment of DAVFs. Fifty-nine percent of the 261 fistulas were totally occluded. Treatment-related major complications were seen in 21 patients.

Conclusions

The advances in diagnostic methods (digital subtraction angiography, CT, and MRI) increased the detection rate of DAVFs, and as treatment modalities developed, the results of treatment and outcome of patients markedly improved with the introduction of endovascular techniques and stereotactic radiosurgery. Microsurgery is of limited use in DAVFs resistant to other treatment modalities.