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Justin K. Scheer, Taemin Oh, Justin S. Smith, Christopher I. Shaffrey, Alan H. Daniels, Daniel M. Sciubba, D. Kojo Hamilton, Themistocles S. Protopsaltis, Peter G. Passias, Robert A. Hart, Douglas C. Burton, Shay Bess, Renaud Lafage, Virginie Lafage, Frank Schwab, Eric O. Klineberg, Christopher P. Ames and the International Spine Study Group

A dult spinal deformity (ASD) surgery remains technically challenging and is associated with high rates of complications, one of which is pseudarthrosis. 8–11 , 22 , 27 The rates of pseudarthrosis in ASD have ranged from 0% to 35%, 5 , 8–10 with one comprehensive review citing pseudarthrosis as the most frequent long-term complication of those studied, reporting a rate of 7.6%. 27 Patients who develop pseudarthrosis are at risk for instrumentation failure and may require revision surgery. Risk factors for pseudarthrosis have been studied and include

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Hiroyuki Yoshihara, Peter G. Passias and Thomas J. Errico

, spinal cord injury (SCI), VA injury, fracture of lateral mass, facet violation, and malposition that required revision or removal. Late screw-related complications included screw loosening, screw pullout, screw breakage, plate/rod breakage, loss of reduction, pseudarthrosis, required revision surgery, and adjacent-segment disease (ASD) requiring surgery. Only complications that were specifically stated as having occurred or not having occurred in the articles were used in the analysis. Complications were not assumed to be absent just because they were not discussed

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Rafael De la Garza-Ramos, Amit Jain, Khaled M. Kebaish, Ali Bydon, Peter G. Passias and Daniel M. Sciubba

A dult spinal deformity (ASD) is a common spinal disorder in patients over 60 years of age, with studies suggesting prevalence as high as 68%. 17 Although corrective surgery achieves better outcomes in terms of leg pain and disability compared with nonoperative treatment, 15 , 19 complication rates range from 37% to 78% in the literature. 1 , 3 , 9 , 18 Risk factors for complication development include age over 65 years, longer constructs, female sex, revision procedures, and having surgery performed by a low-volume surgeon or at a low-volume hospital

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Amit Jain, Hamid Hassanzadeh, Varun Puvanesarajah, Eric O. Klineberg, Daniel M. Sciubba, Michael P. Kelly, D. Kojo Hamilton, Virginie Lafage, Aaron J. Buckland, Peter G. Passias, Themistocles S. Protopsaltis, Renaud Lafage, Justin S. Smith, Christopher I. Shaffrey, Khaled M. Kebaish and the International Spine Study Group

T he incidence of scoliosis in the elderly has been reported to be from 30% to 68%. 25 , 27 Surgical treatment for adult spinal deformity (ASD) is associated with high complication rates. 16 , 17 , 35 A recent study found that approximately 27% of patients with ASD experience at least one medical complication perioperatively. 33 High perioperative complication rates have been reported in elderly patients (aged 65 years or older) surgically treated for ASD and range from 37% to 71%. 1 , 10 , 30 , 32 A large proportion of the morbidity in the elderly is caused

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Micheal Raad, Brian J. Neuman, Amit Jain, Hamid Hassanzadeh, Peter G. Passias, Eric Klineberg, Gregory M. Mundis Jr., Themistocles S. Protopsaltis, Emily K. Miller, Justin S. Smith, Virginie Lafage, D. Kojo Hamilton, Shay Bess, Khaled M. Kebaish, Daniel M. Sciubba and the International Spine Study Group

T here has been a sharp spike in the number of adult spinal deformity (ASD) surgeries performed in the US over the past decade ( https://hcup-us.ahrq.gov/overview.jsp ). Compared with some of the most prevalent chronic diseases such as diabetes, congestive heart failure, or chronic lung disease, ASD has been shown to have a significantly greater impact on health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and higher cost of treatment. 17 , 23 This increased burden of ASD places substantial pressure on the scientific community to better delineate treatment effectiveness in

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Justin K. Scheer, Peter G. Passias, Alexandra M. Sorocean, Anthony J. Boniello, Gregory M. Mundis Jr., Eric Klineberg, Han Jo Kim, Themistocles S. Protopsaltis, Munish Gupta, Shay Bess, Christopher I. Shaffrey, Frank Schwab, Virginie Lafage, Justin S. Smith, Christopher P. Ames and The International Spine Study Group

I ncreasingly , the management of adult spinal deformity (ASD) is considered from a global perspective. 1 , 14 , 16 , 26 The majority of literature regarding the management of ASD has focused on the thoracolumbar region with little regard for the adjacent regions. Several recent studies have demonstrated that regional spinal alignment and pathology can affect other spinal regions. These studies highlight the importance of considering the entire spine when planning for the surgical correction of ASD. Ames et al. 1 reported a significant chain of

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Taemin Oh, Justin K. Scheer, Robert Eastlack, Justin S. Smith, Virginie Lafage, Themistocles S. Protopsaltis, Eric Klineberg, Peter G. Passias, Vedat Deviren, Richard Hostin, Munish Gupta, Shay Bess, Frank Schwab, Christopher I. Shaffrey and Christopher P. Ames

A dult spinal deformity (ASD) is a pathological condition defined as spinal malalignment in the axial, coronal, or sagittal plane and is derivative of congenital, iatrogenic, degenerative, or idiopathic etiology. 30 The restoration of sagittal alignment, as established by the sagittal vertical axis (SVA; target < 5 cm) and pelvic tilt (PT; target < 20°) on sagittal radiography, is important in surgical deformity correction. 6 , 21 , 22 Although coronal plane correction also has clinical relevance, sagittal corrections appear to have greater importance, 5

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Perioperative Care A8 A8 Copyright held by the American Association of Neurological Surgeons. You may not sell, republish, or systematically distribute any published materials without written permission from JNSPG. 2015 Introduction Revision surgery for adjacent segment disease (ASD) has been shown to improve quality of life (QOL) in a cost-effective manner. However, the QOL and financial implications of developing ASD have not been well described in the literature. Methods Individuals with ASD were matched to control patients without ASD that

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the total 511 patients, 502 (98.24%) presented with back pain, 376 (74.17%) with radiculopathy, 76 (14.87%) with motor weakness, and 32 (6.26%) with pre-operative bowel/bladder dysfunction. An average of 2.04 1.03 spinal levels were fused. Post-operatively, patients experienced a significant improvement in back pain (p<0.0001) and radiculopathy (p<0.0001). Patients with fusions excluding the sacrum (floating fusions) were statistically more likely to develop ASD compared with those with fusion constructs ending at S1 distally (p=0.030), but less likely to develop

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, MD, PhD 3 2017 42 3 Peripheral Nerve A10 A11 Copyright held by the American Association of Neurological Surgeons. You may not sell, republish, or systematically distribute any published materials without written permission from JNSPG. 2017 Introduction: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of cervical total disc replacement (TDR) for symptomatic adjacent segment degeneration (ASD) with previous anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) was done, compared to ACDF in the treatment of cervical ASD