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  • Author or Editor: Rafael A. Vega x
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Rafael A. Vega, Charles Opalak, Raymond J. Harshbarger, Jeffrey A. Fearon, Ann M. Ritter, John J. Collins and Jennifer L. Rhodes

OBJECTIVE

This study examines a series of patients with hypophosphatemic rickets and craniosynostosis to characterize the clinical course and associated craniofacial anomalies.

METHODS

A 20-year retrospective review identified patients with hypophosphatemic rickets and secondary craniosynostosis at 3 major craniofacial centers. Parameters examined included sex, age at diagnosis of head shape anomaly, affected sutures, etiology of rickets, presenting symptoms, number and type of surgical interventions, and associated diagnoses. A review of the literature was performed to optimize treatment recommendations.

RESULTS

Ten patients were identified (8 males, 2 females). Age at presentation ranged from 1 to 9 years. The most commonly affected suture was the sagittal (6/10 patients). Etiologies included antacid-induced rickets, autosomal dominant hypophosphatemic rickets, and X-linked hypophosphatemic (XLH) rickets. Nine patients had undergone at least 1 cranial vault remodeling (CVR) surgery. Three patients underwent subsequent surgeries in later years. Four patients underwent formal intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring, 3 of which revealed elevated ICP. Three patients were diagnosed with a Chiari Type I malformation.

CONCLUSIONS

Secondary craniosynostosis develops postnatally due to metabolic or mechanical factors. The most common metabolic cause is hypophosphatemic rickets, which has a variety of etiologies. Head shape changes occur later and with a more heterogeneous presentation compared with that of primary craniosynostosis. CVR may be required to prevent or relieve elevated ICP and abnormalities of the cranial vault. Children with hypophosphatemic rickets who develop head shape abnormalities should be promptly referred to a craniofacial specialist.

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Vyshak Chandra, Andrew K. Rock, Charles Opalak, Joel M. Stary, Adam P. Sima, Matthew Carr, Rafael A. Vega and William C. Broaddus

OBJECTIVE

The majority of neurosurgeons administer antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) prophylactically for supratentorial tumor resection without clear evidence to support this practice. The putative benefit of perioperative seizure prophylaxis must be weighed against the risks of adverse effects and drug interactions in patients without a history of seizures. Consequently, the authors conducted a systematic review of prospective randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that have evaluated the efficacy of perioperative seizure prophylaxis among patients without a history of seizures.

METHODS

Five databases (PubMed/MEDLINE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, CINAHL/Academic Search Complete, Web of Science, and ScienceDirect) were searched for RCTs published before May 2017 and investigating perioperative seizure prophylaxis in brain tumor resection. Of the 496 unique research articles identified, 4 were selected for inclusion in this review.

RESULTS

This systematic review revealed a weighted average seizure rate of 10.65% for the control groups. There was no significant difference in seizure rates among the groups that received seizure prophylaxis and those that did not. Further, this expected incidence of new-onset postoperative seizures would require a total of 1258 patients to enroll in a RCT, as determined by a Farrington-Manning noninferiority test performed at the 0.05 level using a noninferiority difference of 5%.

CONCLUSIONS

According to a systematic review of major RCTs, the administration of prophylactic AEDs after brain tumor resection shows no significant reduction in the incidence of seizures compared with that in controls. A large multicenter randomized clinical trial would be required to assess whether perioperative seizure prophylaxis provides benefit for patients undergoing brain tumor resection.