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  • Author or Editor: Taner Tanriverdi x
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Taner Tanriverdi, Abdulrazag Ajlan, Nicole Poulin and Andre Olivier

Object

In this paper the authors aimed to provide information related to major and minor surgical and neurological complications encountered following stereoelectroencephalography and epilepsy surgery.

Methods

The authors performed a retrospective review of 491 and 1905 patients who underwent intracranial electrode implantation and epilepsy surgery, respectively, between 1976 and 2006 at the Montreal Neurological Institute. All intracranial electrode implantations and surgical procedures were performed by 1 surgeon (A.O.).

Results

A total of 6415 electrode implantations and 2449 surgical procedures were done. There were no deaths related to either procedure. There were no major complications after intracranial electrode implantation, and the risks of infection and intracranial hematoma were found to be 1.8 and 0.8%, respectively. The number of electrodes per lobe (p = 0.05) and number of lobes covered (p = 0.04) were significant risk factors for hematoma and infection. Regarding epilepsy surgery, there were no major surgical complications, and the overall minor complication rate was 2.9%. Infection was the most common complication (1.0%), followed by intracranial hematoma (0.7%). Significant risk factors associated with hematomas and infections were the number of reoperations (p = 0.001) and older patient age (p = 0.03). Minor and major neurological complication rates were 2.7 and 0.5%, respectively, and the rate of overall neurological morbidity was 3.3%. Hemiparesis was the most frequent neurological complication (1.5%).

Conclusions

Based on the authors' experience, intracranial electrode implantation is an effective method with an extremely low morbidity rate. Moreover, epilepsy surgery is safe, especially in experienced hands.

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Taner Tanriverdi, Andre Olivier, Nicole Poulin, Frederick Andermann and François Dubeau

Object

Resection strategies for the treatment of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) are a matter of discussion, and little information is available. The aim of this study was to compare seizure outcomes at the 5-year follow-up in patients with medically refractory unilateral mesial TLE (MTLE) due to hippocampal sclerosis (HS) who were treated using a cortical amygdalohippocampectomy (CorAH) or a selective AH (SelAH).

Methods

The authors obtained data from 100 adult patients who underwent surgery for MTLE. Fifty patients underwent a CorAH and 50 underwent an SelAH. Seizure control achieved with each technique was compared using the Engel classification scheme.

Results

Overall, at the 5-year follow-up, favorable (Engel Classes I and II) seizure outcomes were noted in 82 and 90% of patients who had undergone CorAH and SelAH, respectively. Furthermore, 40% of the patients who had undergone a CorAH and 58% of those who had undergone an SelAH were seizure free (Engel Class Ia). There was no statistically significant difference between the 2 surgical approaches in terms of seizure outcome at the 5-year follow-up (p = 0.38).

Conclusions

Both CorAH and SelAH can lead to similar favorable seizure control in patients with MTLE/HS. However, the authors suggest that the transcortical selective approach has the great advantage of minimizing or completely abolishing the impact of dividing several venous and arterial adhesions which are tedious, time consuming, and, at times, associated with some degree of cerebral swelling.