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  • Author or Editor: Kenichi Sato x
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Kenichi Sato, Toshiki Endo, Kuniyasu Niizuma, Miki Fujimura, Takashi Inoue, Hiroaki Shimizu and Teiji Tominaga

Object

Dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVFs) and perimedullary arteriovenous fistulas (PAVFs) are uncommonly associated in the craniocervical junction. The purpose of this study was to describe the clinical and angiographic characteristics of such concurrent lesions.

Methods

Authors reviewed 9 cases with a coexistent DAVF and PAVF at the craniocervical junction. Clinical presentation, angiographic characteristics, intraoperative findings, and treatment outcomes were assessed.

Results

All patients (male/female ratio 5:4; mean age 66.3 years) presented with subarachnoid hemorrhage. Angiography revealed that 8 patients had both a DAVF and PAVF on the same side, whereas 1 patient had 3 arteriovenous fistulas, 1 DAVF, and 1 PAVF on the right side and 1 DAVF on the left side. All of the fistulas shared dilated perimedullary veins (anterior spinal vein, 7 cases; anterolateral spinal vein, 2 cases) as a main drainage route. The shared drainage route was rostrally directed in 8 of 9 cases. Eight patients exhibited an arterial aneurysm on the distal side of the feeding arteries to the PAVF, and the aneurysm in each case was intraoperatively confirmed as a bleeding point. One patient had ruptured venous ectasia at the perimedullary fistulous point. All patients underwent direct surgery via a posterolateral approach. No recurrence was observed in the 4 patients who underwent postoperative angiography, and no rebleeding event was recorded among any of the 9 patients during the follow-up period (mean 38.4 months).

Conclusions

The similarity of the angioarchitecture and the close anatomical relationship between DAVF and PAVF at the craniocervical junction suggested that these lesions are pathogenetically linked. The pathophysiological mechanism and anatomical features of these lesions represent a unique vascular anomaly that should be recognized angiographically to plan a therapeutic strategy.

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Shunsuke Omodaka, Hidenori Endo, Kuniyasu Niizuma, Miki Fujimura, Takashi Inoue, Toshiki Endo, Kenichi Sato, Shin-ichiro Sugiyama and Teiji Tominaga

OBJECTIVE

Recent MR vessel wall imaging studies have indicated intracranial aneurysms in the active state could show circumferential enhancement along the aneurysm wall (CEAW). While ruptured aneurysms frequently show CEAW, CEAW in unruptured aneurysms at the evolving state (i.e., growing or symptomatic) has not been studied in detail. The authors quantitatively assessed the degree of CEAW in evolving unruptured aneurysms by comparing it separately to that in stable unruptured and ruptured aneurysms.

METHODS

A quantitative analysis of CEAW was performed in 26 consecutive evolving aneurysms using MR vessel wall imaging. Three-dimensional T1-weighted fast spin echo sequences were obtained before and after contrast media injection, and the contrast ratio of the aneurysm wall against the pituitary stalk (CRstalk) was calculated as the indicator of CEAW. Aneurysm characteristics of evolving aneurysms were compared with those of 69 stable unruptured and 67 ruptured aneurysms.

RESULTS

The CRstalk values in evolving aneurysms were significantly higher than those in stable aneurysms (0.54 vs 0.34, p < 0.0001), and lower than those in ruptured aneurysms (0.54 vs 0.83, p < 0.0002). In multivariable analysis, CRstalk remained significant when comparing evolving with stable aneurysms (odds ratio [OR] 12.23, 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.53–42.41), and with ruptured aneurysms (OR 0.083, 95% CI 0.022–0.310).

CONCLUSIONS

The CEAW in evolving aneurysms was higher than those in stable aneurysms, and lower than those in ruptured aneurysms. The degree of CEAW may indicate the process leading to rupture of intracranial aneurysms, which can be useful additional information to determine an indication for surgical treatment of unruptured aneurysms.

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Alaa Elkordy, Hidenori Endo, Kenichi Sato, Yasushi Matsumoto, Ryushi Kondo, Kuniyasu Niizuma, Toshiki Endo, Miki Fujimura and Teiji Tominaga

OBJECTIVE

The anterior and posterior choroidal arteries are often recruited to supply arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) involving important paraventricular structures, such as the basal ganglia, internal capsule, optic radiation, lateral geniculate body, and medial temporal lobe. Endovascular embolization through these arteries is theoretically dangerous because they supply eloquent territories, are of small caliber, and lack collaterals. This study aimed to investigate the safety and efficacy of embolization through these arteries.

METHODS

This study retrospectively reviewed 13 patients with cerebral AVMs who underwent endovascular embolization through the choroidal arteries between 2006 and 2014. Embolization was performed as a palliative procedure before open surgery or Gamma Knife radiosurgery. Computed tomography and MRI were performed the day after embolization to assess any surgical complications. The incidence and type of complications and their association with clinical outcomes were analyzed.

RESULTS

Decreased blood flow was achieved in all patients after embolization. Postoperative CT detected no hemorrhagic complications. In contrast, postoperative MRI detected that 4 of the 13 patients (30.7%) developed infarctions: 3 patients after embolization through the anterior choroidal artery, and 1 patient after embolization through the lateral posterior choroidal artery. Two of the 4 patients in whom embolization was from the cisternal segment of the anterior choroidal artery (proximal to the plexal point) developed symptomatic infarction of the posterior limb of the internal capsule, 1 of whom developed morbidity (7.7%). The treatment-related mortality rate was 0%. Additional treatment was performed in 12 patients: open surgery in 9 and Gamma Knife radiosurgery in 3 patients. Complete obliteration was confirmed by angiography at the last follow-up in 10 patients. Recurrent bleeding from the AVMs did not occur in any of the cases during the follow-up period.

CONCLUSIONS

Ischemic complications are possible following the embolization of cerebral AVMs through the choroidal artery, even with modern neurointerventional devices and techniques. Although further study is needed, embolization through the choroidal artery may be an appropriate treatment option when the risk of surgery or radiosurgery is considered to outweigh the risk of embolization.

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Ahmed Mansour, Kuniyasu Niizuma, Sherif Rashad, Akira Sumiyoshi, Rie Ryoke, Hidenori Endo, Toshiki Endo, Kenichi Sato, Ryuta Kawashima and Teiji Tominaga

OBJECTIVE

The cognitive deficits of vascular dementia and the vasoocclusive state of moyamoya disease have often been mimicked with bilateral stenosis/occlusion of the common carotid artery (CCA) or internal carotid artery. However, the cerebral blood flow (CBF) declines abruptly in these models after ligation of the CCA, which differs from “chronic” cerebral hypoperfusion. While some modified but time-consuming techniques have used staged occlusion of both CCAs, others used microcoils for CCA stenosis, producing an adverse effect on the arterial endothelium. Thus, the authors developed a new chronic cerebral hypoperfusion (CCH) model with cognitive impairment and a low mortality rate in rats.

METHODS

Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to unilateral CCA occlusion and contralateral induction of CCA stenosis (modified CCA occlusion [mCCAO]) or a sham operation. Cortical regional CBF (rCBF) was measured using laser speckle flowmetry. Cognitive function was assessed using a Barnes circular maze (BCM). MRI studies were performed 4 weeks after the operation to evaluate cervical and intracranial arteries and parenchymal injury. Behavioral and histological studies were performed at 4 and 8 weeks after surgery.

RESULTS

The mCCAO group revealed a gradual CBF reduction with a low mortality rate (2.3%). White matter degeneration was evident in the corpus callosum and corpus striatum. Although the cellular density declined in the hippocampus, MRI revealed no cerebral infarctions after mCCAO. Immunohistochemistry revealed upregulated inflammatory cells and angiogenesis in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex. Results of the BCM assessment indicated significant impairment in spatial learning and memory in the mCCAO group. Although some resolution of white matter injury was observed at 8 weeks, the animals still had cognitive impairment.

CONCLUSIONS

The mCCAO is a straightforward method of producing a CCH model in rats. It is associated with a low mortality rate and could potentially be used to investigate vascular disease, moyamoya disease, and CCH. This model was verified for an extended time point of 8 weeks after surgery.

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Sherif Rashad, Shin-ichiro Sugiyama, Kuniyasu Niizuma, Kenichi Sato, Hidenori Endo, Shunsuke Omodaka, Yasushi Matsumoto, Miki Fujimura and Teiji Tominaga

OBJECTIVE

Risk factors for aneurysm rupture have been extensively studied, with several factors showing significant correlations with rupture status. Several studies have shown that aneurysm shape and hemodynamics change after rupture. In the present study the authors investigated a static factor, the bifurcation angle, which does not change after rupture, to understand its effect on aneurysm rupture risk and hemodynamics.

METHODS

A hospital database was retrospectively reviewed to identify patients with cerebral aneurysms treated surgically or endovascularly in the period between 2008 and 2015. After acquiring 3D rotational angiographic data, 3D stereolithography models were created and computational fluid dynamic analysis was performed using commercially available software. Patient data (age and sex), morphometric factors (aneurysm volume and maximum height, aspect ratio, bifurcation angle, bottleneck ratio, and neck/parent artery ratio), and hemodynamic factors (inflow coefficient and wall shear stress) were statistically compared between ruptured and unruptured groups.

RESULTS

Seventy-one basilar tip aneurysms were included in this study, 22 ruptured and 49 unruptured. Univariate analysis showed aspect ratio, bifurcation angle, bottleneck ratio, and inflow coefficient were significantly correlated with a ruptured status. Logistic regression analysis showed that aspect ratio and bifurcation angle were significant predictors of a ruptured status. Bifurcation angle was inversely correlated with inflow coefficient (p < 0.0005), which in turn correlated directly with mean (p = 0.028) and maximum (p = 0.014) wall shear stress (WSS) using Pearson's correlation coefficient, whereas aspect ratio was inversely correlated with mean (0.012) and minimum (p = 0.018) WSS.

CONCLUSIONS

Bifurcation angle and aspect ratio are independent predictors for aneurysm rupture. Bifurcation angle, which does not change after rupture, is correlated with hemodynamic factors including inflow coefficient and WSS, as well as rupture status. Aneurysms with the hands-up bifurcation configuration are more prone to rupture than aneurysms with other bifurcation configurations.