Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 2 of 2 items for

  • Author or Editor: Akira Ogawa x
  • By Author: Mizoi, Kazuo x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Kazuo Mizoi, Takashi Yoshimoto, Akira Takahashi and Akira Ogawa

✓ In the surgical treatment of basilar trunk aneurysms, there is still considerable technical difficulty in gaining both proximal artery control and a sufficient operative field. The authors describe their experience in five patients with basilar trunk aneurysms treated using temporary balloon occlusion and intraoperative digital subtraction angiography. With the patient under general anesthesia, a heparinized angiography catheter was guided into the dominant vertebral artery by means of the Seldinger technique. A silicone balloon catheter was introduced coaxially through the angiography catheter to the basilar artery just proximal to the aneurysm. The balloon was inflated tentatively to evaluate the appropriate inflation volume, then the balloon catheter was withdrawn back into the angiography catheter to prevent thrombus formation. After exposure of the aneurysm, the occlusion balloon was advanced again and inflated temporarily within the basilar artery to prevent premature rupture and to facilitate dissection of the aneurysm. The mean duration of temporary balloon occlusion was 22 minutes. There were no patients with postoperative deficits attributable to the temporary occlusion. The results of aneurysm clip placement were confirmed by intraoperative digital subtraction angiography immediately after clipping. No patient suffered from distal embolism or other complications related to vessel catheterization. From this experience, it is concluded that this intraoperative endovascular technique can contribute to the success of surgery for complex cerebral aneurysms, particularly for basilar trunk aneurysms in which proximal vascular control is difficult.

Restricted access

Michiyasu Suzuki, Takehide Onuma, Yoshiharu Sakurai, Kazuo Mizoi, Akira Ogawa and Takashi Yoshimoto

✓ This study reviews aneurysms of the proximal segment (A1) of the anterior cerebral artery in 38 patients (23 men and 15 women) and their surgical, angiographic, and clinical management. Thirty-seven aneurysms were saccular and one was fusiform. The incidence of A1 aneurysms among a total of 4295 aneurysm cases treated was 0.88%. Multiple aneurysms occurred in 17 patients (44.7%) of the 38 cases; in 10 (58.8%), there was bleeding from the A1 aneurysm. The aneurysms were classified into five categories according to the mode of origin of the aneurysm in relation to the A1 segment: in 21 cases, aneurysms originated from the junction of the A1 segment and a perforating artery; in eight, from the A1 segment directly; in six, from the proximal end of the A1 fenestration; and in two, from the junction of the A1 segment and the cortical branch. One patient had a fusiform aneurysm. Computerized tomography (CT) of these aneurysms revealed bleeding extending to the septum pellucidum similar to that of anterior communicating artery aneurysms. When performing radical surgery it is very important to recognize the characteristics of A1 aneurysms, including multiplicity, a high incidence of vascular anomalies (especially A1 fenestration), and their similarity to anterior communicating artery aneurysms on CT.