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Jason P. Sheehan, Robert M. Starke, Hideyuki Kano, Gene H. Barnett, David Mathieu, Veronica Chiang, James B. Yu, Judith Hess, Heyoung L. McBride, Norissa Honea, Peter Nakaji, John Y. K. Lee, Gazanfar Rahmathulla, Wendi A. Evanoff, Michelle Alonso-Basanta and L. Dade Lunsford

series, this contemporary approach has led to morbidity and mortality rates of 0%–13% and 13%–40%, respectively. Recurrence rates after an initial resection vary from 12% to 91%. 1–5 , 7 , 9–12 , 15–17 , 20–22 , 24 , 27 , 28 , 31–33 , 36 , 38 , 41–43 , 45–48 , 51 , 54 , 56 Such recurrences depend upon the length of follow-up, characteristics of the tumor, and the extent of the initial resection. Although repeat resection is feasible, repeat resection is associated with increased morbidity and mortality due to difficult resection planes. 5 , 7 , 22 , 24 , 60

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regional EMS providers. Data from 2008 through 2012 were analyzed before and after NOTS formation in 2010. Multivariate regression analysis (RA) was performed to evaluate independent predictors of survival. Results 11,220 patients were identified with TBI in the NOTS database; 4, 507 (40%) before NOTS and 6, 713 (60%) after NOTS. Admissions to the regional level 1 center post-NOTS increased from 36% to 46% (p <0.0001). Injury severity scores and Abbreviated Injury Scores (AIS) were similar between periods. The mortality rate decreased from 6.2% to 4.9% (p=0

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country-wide. The overall incidence of trauma associated pediatric coma decreased in 2012, perhaps reflecting the success of awareness and prevention efforts. However mortality rates remain unchanged from 1997 – 2012, indicating a clear role for future efforts to better describe, characterize, and treat the underlying pathology. J Neurosurg Journal of Neurosurgery JNS 0022-3085 1933-0693 American Association of Neurological Surgeons 2015.8.JNS.AANS2015ABSTRACTS Abstract 502. Effect of Antiplatelet Therapy and Platelet Function

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Hideyuki Kano, Jason Sheehan, Penny K. Sneed, Heyoung L. McBride, Byron Young, Christopher Duma, David Mathieu, Zachary Seymour, Michael W. McDermott, Douglas Kondziolka, Aditya Iyer and L. Dade Lunsford

560 cases of chondrosarcoma and found a recurrence rate of 44% of patients who underwent resection as the sole treatment, compared with 9% in patients who had surgery followed by radiation therapy. The 5-year mortality rate was 11.5%, and the median survival was 24 months. The authors found no association between the rate of recurrence and the histological grade of the tumor. 4 Studies using proton beam RT for chondrosarcomas suggest that the overall survival and local tumor control rates at 5 years are above 90%. 14 , 21 , 26 Amichetti et al. 1 reported that the

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, Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and EQ-5D scores, were obtained both preand post-operatively. Results: The median survival was 7.7 months. The 30-day and 12-month mortality rates were 9% and 62%, respectively. Six weeks post-operatively, ambulatory status (p = 0.02) and bladder control (p = 0.03) were significantly improved. Overall, 67.5% of ASIA B, C, or D patients gained at least 1 grade after surgery, 25% remained stable, and 7.5% deteriorated. ODI, EQ-5D, BPI scores were significantly improved at each follow-up (p ≤ 0.01). SF-36 scores were generally higher

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Or Cohen-Inbar, Robert M. Starke, Gabriella Paisan, Hideyuki Kano, Paul P. Huang, Rafael Rodriguez-Mercado, Luis Almodovar, Inga S. Grills, David Mathieu, Danilo Silva, Mahmoud Abbassy, Symeon Missios, John Y. K. Lee, Gene H. Barnett, Douglas Kondziolka, L. Dade Lunsford and Jason P. Sheehan

between groups when symptomatic or permanent RICs were compared (9.9% late vs 7.5% early responders, p = 0.468 for symptomatic RICs; and 2.3% vs 3%, respectively, p = 0.431 for permanent RICs). Overall mortality rates were comparable between the 2 groups (2.2% late vs 3% early responders, p = 0.886). Favorable outcome (that is, AVM nidus obliteration without post-SRS latent phase hemorrhage or permanent SRS-associated RICs) was not found to differ significantly between the 2 groups (p = 0.421). As shown in Table 2 , patients who received a higher margin dose were more

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Or Cohen-Inbar, Robert M. Starke, Hideyuki Kano, Gregory Bowden, Paul Huang, Rafael Rodriguez-Mercado, Luis Almodovar, Inga S. Grills, David Mathieu, Danilo Silva, Mahmoud Abbassy, Symeon Missios, John Y. K. Lee, Gene H. Barnett, Douglas Kondziolka, L. Dade Lunsford and Jason P. Sheehan

fossa AVMs have a mortality rate as high as 60% for patients presenting with a nidus-related hemorrhage. 4 The management of these neurovascular lesions is complicated by the anatomical constraints of the posterior fossa and the concentration of eloquent neurological structures. The smaller and limited volume of the posterior fossa does not allow for much volume expansion (due to AVM nidus hemorrhage or edema). Clinical manifestation and neurological decompensation ensues earlier than for equal-volume supratentorial hemorrhages. 7 , 20 , 28 Unlike brainstem AVMs

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Hideyuki Kano, Dusan Urgosik, Roman Liscak, Bruce E. Pollock, Or Cohen-Inbar, Jason P. Sheehan, Mayur Sharma, Danilo Silva, Gene H. Barnett, David Mathieu, Nathaniel D. Sisterson and L. Dade Lunsford

of complete pain relief of 76%–97% and low complication rates (3%–19%). 12 , 13 , 15 , 19 Rey-Dios and Cohen-Gadol 16 reported that the rate of long-term freedom from pain for patients who underwent MVD was 84.7% and that the recurrence rate was 7%. Patients who underwent rhizotomy experienced long-term pain relief in 87.3% of cases, with pain recurrence in 8.2%. The surgical mortality rates for MVD and rhizotomy were 1.1% and 5%, respectively. Permanent lower cranial nerve deficits occurred in 5.5% of MVD and in 19.1% of rhizotomy patients. In the present SRS

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Dale Ding, Robert M. Starke, Hideyuki Kano, David Mathieu, Paul P. Huang, Caleb Feliciano, Rafael Rodriguez-Mercado, Luis Almodovar, Inga S. Grills, Danilo Silva, Mahmoud Abbassy, Symeon Missios, Douglas Kondziolka, Gene H. Barnett, L. Dade Lunsford and Jason P. Sheehan

followed for 9 years found a 13 per 100,000 annual incidence of stroke, including 8 per 100,000 and 5 per 100,000 annual incidences of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, respectively. 36 In 82% of the patients who suffered a hemorrhagic stroke, the cause was a vascular malformation. 36 A study including 116 children with hemorrhagic stroke found an AVM to be the cause in 31% of cases. 41 In a cohort of 34 patients with spontaneous ICH, an AVM was identified as the cause in 47%. 50 The ICH mortality rate was 25%, and 22% of survivors suffered from severe neurological

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Robert M. Starke, Dale Ding, Hideyuki Kano, David Mathieu, Paul P. Huang, Caleb Feliciano, Rafael Rodriguez-Mercado, Luis Almodovar, Inga S. Grills, Danilo Silva, Mahmoud Abbassy, Symeon Missios, Douglas Kondziolka, Gene H. Barnett, L. Dade Lunsford and Jason P. Sheehan

patients died (0.8%), resulting in a combined neurological morbidity and mortality rate of 5.3%. The rates of increased seizure frequency and de novo seizures were 6.9% (2/29 patients) and 0.3% (1/328 patients), respectively. Favorable Outcome At last follow-up, a favorable outcome (defined as AVM obliteration, no post-radiosurgery hemorrhage, and no permanently symptomatic RIC) was achieved in 211 patients (59.1%; Fig. 4 ). Table 4 details the univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses for predictors of favorable outcome after radiosurgery. In the