Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 2 of 2 items for

  • Author or Editor: Ting Lei x
  • By Author: Martirosyan, Nikolay L. x
Clear All Modify Search
Free access

M. Yashar S. Kalani, Ting Lei, Nikolay L. Martirosyan, Mark E. Oppenlander, Robert F. Spetzler and Peter Nakaji

The mesial temporal lobe can be approached via a pterional or orbitozygomatic craniotomy, the subtemporal approach, or transcortically. Alternatively, the entire mesial temporal lobe can be accessed using a lateral supracerebellar transtentorial (SCTT) approach. Here we describe the technical nuances of patient positioning, craniotomy, supracerebellar dissection, and tentorial disconnection to traverse the tentorial incisura to arrive at the posterior mesial temporal lobe for a cavernous malformation. The SCTT approach is especially useful for lesions in the dominant temporal lobe where an anterolateral approach may endanger language centers or the vein of Labbé.

The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/D8mIR5yeiVw.

Restricted access

Evgenii Belykh, Kaan Yağmurlu, Ting Lei, Sam Safavi-Abbasi, Mark E. Oppenlander, Nikolay L. Martirosyan, Vadim A. Byvaltsev, Robert F. Spetzler, Peter Nakaji and Mark C. Preul

OBJECTIVE

The best approach to deep-seated lateral and third ventricle lesions is a function of lesion characteristics, location, and relationship to the ventricles. The authors sought to examine and compare angles of attack and surgical freedom of anterior ipsilateral and contralateral interhemispheric transcallosal approaches to the frontal horn of the lateral ventricle using human cadaveric head dissections. Illustrative clinical experiences with a contralateral interhemispheric transcallosal approach and an anterior interhemispheric transcallosal transchoroidal approach are also related.

METHODS

Five formalin-fixed human cadaveric heads (10 sides) were examined microsurgically. CT and MRI scans obtained before dissection were uploaded and fused into the navigation system. The authors performed contralateral and ipsilateral transcallosal approaches to the lateral ventricle. Using the navigation system, they measured areas of exposure, surgical freedom, angles of attack, and angle of view to the surgical surface. Two clinical cases are described.

RESULTS

The exposed areas of the ipsilateral (mean [± SD] 313.8 ± 85.0 mm2) and contralateral (344 ± 87.73 mm2) interhemispheric approaches were not significantly different (p = 0.12). Surgical freedom and vertical angles of attack were significantly larger for the contralateral approach to the most midsuperior reachable point (p = 0.02 and p = 0.01, respectively) and to the posterosuperior (p = 0.02 and p = 0.04) and central (p = 0.04 and p = 0.02) regions of the lateral wall of the lateral ventricle. Surgical freedom and vertical angles of attack to central and anterior points on the floor of the lateral ventricle did not differ significantly with approach. The angle to the surface of the caudate head region was less steep for the contralateral (135.6° ± 15.6°) than for the ipsilateral (152.0° ± 13.6°) approach (p = 0.02).

CONCLUSIONS

The anterior contralateral interhemispheric transcallosal approach provided a more expansive exposure to the lower two-thirds of the lateral ventricle and striothalamocapsular region. In normal-sized ventricles, the foramen of Monro and the choroidal fissure were better visualized through the lateral ventricle ipsilateral to the craniotomy than through the contralateral approach.