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  • Author or Editor: Lin Luo x
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Hua-Jun Zhou, Hai-Nan Zhang, Tao Tang, Jian-Hua Zhong, Yong Qi, Jie-Kun Luo, Yuan Lin, Qi-Dong Yang and Xing-Qun Li

Object

Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is among the most intractable forms of stroke. Angiogenesis, an orchestrated balance between proangiogenic and antiangiogenic factors, is a fundamental process to brain development and repair by new blood vessel formation from preexisting ones and can be induced by ICH. Thrombospondin (TSP)–1 and TSP-2 are naturally occurring antiangiogenic factors. The aim of this study was to observe their expression in rat brains with ICH.

Methods

Intracerebral hemorrhage was induced in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats by stereotactic injection of collagenase VII or autologous blood into the right globus pallidus. The expression of TSP-1 and -2 was evaluated by immunohistochemistry and quantitative real-time reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction analysis.

Results

After the induction of ICH, some TSP1- or TSP2-immunoreactive microvessels resided around the hematoma for ~ 7 days and extended into a clot thereafter. Cerebral endothelial cells expressed the TSPs. The expression of TSP-1 and TSP-2 mRNA peaked at 4 and 14 days after collagenase-induced ICH, respectively.

Conclusions

Findings in this study suggest that ICH can alter the expression of TSP-1 and TSP-2, which may be involved in modulating angiogenesis in brains following ICH.

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Hua-Jun Zhou, Tao Tang, Han-Jin Cui, A-Li Yang, Jie-Kun Luo, Yuan Lin, Qi-Dong Yang and Xing-Qun Li

Object

Angiogenesis occurs after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Thrombin mediates mitogenesis and survival in endothelial cells and induces angiogenesis. The present study aimed to clarify whether thrombin is involved in triggering ICH-related angiogenesis.

Methods

In the first part of the experiment, autologous blood (with or without hirudin) was injected to induce ICH. In the second part, rats received either 1 U (50 μl) thrombin or 50 μl 0.9% sterile saline. In both parts, 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) was administered intraperitoneally. Brains were perfused to identify BrdU-positive/von Willebrand factor (vWF)–positive nuclei. The expression of hypoxia-inducible factor–1α (HIF-1α), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), angiopoietin-1 (Ang-1) and Ang-2 was evaluated by immunohistochemistry and quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction.

Results

After ICH, the number of BrdU-/vWF-positive nuclei increased until Day 14, and vessels positive for HIF-1α, VEGF, Ang-1, and Ang-2 were observed around the clot. Quantitative analysis showed that ICH upregulated expression of HIF-1α, VEGF, Ang-1, and Ang-2 notably compared with that in sham controls (p < 0.05). However, hirudin significantly inhibited these effects. After thrombin treatment, many BrdU-positive/vWF-positive nuclei and HIF-1α–, VEGF-, Ang-1– and Ang-2–positive vessels could be detected around the affected region.

Conclusions

Thrombin can induce angiogenesis in rat brains and may be an important trigger for ICH-related angiogenesis.