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  • Author or Editor: Jan Claassen x
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Bartosz T. Grobelny, Andrew F. Ducruet, Peter A. DeRosa, Ivan S. Kotchetkov, Brad E. Zacharia, Zachary L. Hickman, Luis Fernandez, Reshma Narula, Jan Claassen, Kiwon Lee, Neeraj Badjatia, Stephan A. Mayer and E. Sander Connolly Jr.

Object

Cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) is an enzyme that metabolizes homocysteine to form H2S in the brain. Hydrogen sulfide functions as a vasodilator as well as a regulator of neuronal ion channels and multiple intracellular signaling pathways. Given the myriad effects of H2S, the authors hypothesized that patients possessing gain-of-function polymorphisms of the CBS gene will experience a decreased incidence of delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH).

Methods

Patients were enrolled in a prospective observational database of aSAH outcomes. DNA was extracted from buccal swabs and sequenced for 3 functional polymorphisms of the CBS gene (699C→T, 844ins68, and 1080C→T) by polymerase chain reaction. Serum homocysteine levels (μmol/L) were assayed. Multivariate analysis was used to determine the relationship between CBS genotype and occurrence of both angiographic vasospasm and DCI.

Results

There were 87 patients included in the study. None of the polymorphisms investigated were significantly associated with the incidence of angiographic vasospasm. However, after controlling for admission hypertension, patients with the gain-of-function 844 WT/ins genotypes were less likely to experience DCI relative to those with the 844 WT/WT genotype (86 patients, p = 0.050), while the decrease-in-function genotype 1080 TT was more likely to experience DCI relative to those with 1080 CC and CT genotypes (84 patients, p = 0.042). Serum homocysteine levels did not correlate with the extent of either angiographic vasospasm or DCI in this analysis.

Conclusions

Polymorphisms of the CBS gene that impart gain-of-function may be associated with a reduced risk of DCI after aSAH, independent of serum homocysteine. Signaling through H2S may mediate protection from DCI following aSAH through a mechanism that does not involve macrovascular vasodilation.

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Fred Rincon, Errol Gordon, Robert M. Starke, Manuel M. Buitrago, Andres Fernandez, J. Michael Schmidt, Jan Claassen, Katja E. Wartenberg, Jennifer Frontera, David B. Seder, David Palestrant, E. Sander Connolly, Kiwon Lee, Stephan A. Mayer and Neeraj Badjatia

Object

The purpose of this study was to identify predictors of shunt-dependent hydrocephalus after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH).

Methods

The authors evaluated the incidence of shunt-dependent hydrocephalus in a consecutive cohort of 580 patients with SAH who were admitted to the Neurological Intensive Care Unit of Columbia University Medical Center between July 1996 and September 2002. Patient demographics, 24-hour admission variables, initial CT scan characteristics, daily transcranial Doppler variables, and development of in-hospital complications were analyzed. Odds ratios and 95% CIs for candidate predictors were calculated using multivariate nominal logistic regression.

Results

Admission glucose of at least 126 mg/dl (adjusted OR 1.6; 95% CI 1.0–2.6), admission brain CT scan with a bicaudate index of at least 0.20 (adjusted OR 1.43; 95% CI 1.0–2.0), Fisher Grade 4 (adjusted OR 2.71; 95% CI 1.2–5.7), fourth ventricle hemorrhage (adjusted OR 1.78; 95% CI 1.1–2.7), and development of nosocomial meningitis (adjusted OR 2.2; 95% CI 1.4–3.7) were independently associated with shunt dependency.

Conclusions

These data suggest that permanent CSF diversion after aneurysmal SAH may be independently predicted by hyperglycemia at admission, findings on the admission CT scan (Fisher Grade 4, fourth ventricle intraventricular hemorrhage, and bicaudate index ≥ 0.20), and development of nosocomial meningitis. Future research is needed to assess if tight glycemic control, reduction of fourth ventricle clot burden, and prevention of nosocomial meningitis may reduce the need for permanent CSF diversion after aneurysmal SAH.

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Oral Presentations

2010 AANS Annual Meeting Philadelphia, Pennsylvania May 1–5, 2010