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  • Author or Editor: Kostas N. Fountas x
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Kostas N. Fountas, Joseph R. Smith, Gregory P. Lee, Patrick D. Jenkins, Rebecca R. Cantrell and W. Chris Sheils

Object

Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) with the Gamma Knife (GK) is a rapidly emerging surgical modality in the management of medically refractory idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia (TN). The current study examines the long-term outcome in patients with drug-resistant idiopathic TN who underwent GK surgery at the authors‘ institution.

Methods

One hundred and six consecutive patients (38 men and 68 women) with proven medically refractory idiopathic TN were included in this retrospective study. Their ages were 41–82 years (mean 72.3 years). All patients underwent SRS with prescribed maximal radiation doses ranging from 70 to 85 Gy. Isocenters 1–3 were used and plugging was used selectively. The follow-up period was 12–72 months (mean 34.3 months). The patients were divided into 2 groups according to their history of previous surgery.

Results

The initial response rate in patients with no history of previous surgery was 92.9%; in those who had undergone previous surgery, the initial response rate was 85.7%. At the end of the 1st posttreatment year, an excellent outcome was achieved in 82.5% of patients who had not had previous surgery, and in 69.4% of those who had. The respective outcome rates for the 2nd posttreatment year were 78 and 63.5%, respectively. The most common complication was the development of persistent paresthesia, which occurred in 15.8% of patients with no previous surgery and 16.3% of those with previous surgery.

Conclusions

Stereotactic radiosurgery with the GK is a safe and effective treatment option for patients with medically refractory idiopathic TN.

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Kostas N. Fountas, Anastasia Tasiou, Eftychia Z. Kapsalaki, Konstantinos N. Paterakis, Arthur A. Grigorian, Gregory P. Lee and Joe Sam Robinson Jr.

Object

Cerebral vasospasm is a common and potentially devastating complication of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH). Inflammatory processes seem to play a major role in the pathogenesis of vasospasm. The Creactive protein (CRP) constitutes a highly sensitive inflammatory marker. The association of elevated systemic CRP and coronary vasospasm has been well established. Additionally, elevation of the serum CRP levels has been demonstrated in patients with aSAH. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the possible relationship between elevated CRP levels in the serum and CSF and the development of vasospasm in patients with aSAH.

Methods

. A total of 41 adult patients in whom aSAH was diagnosed were included in the study. Their demographics, the admitting Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score, Hunt and Hess grade, Fisher grade, CT scans, digital subtraction angiography studies, and daily neurological examinations were recorded. Serial serum and CSF CRP measurements were obtained on Days 0, 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, and 9. All patients underwent either surgical or endovascular treatment within 48 hours of their admission. The outcome was evaluated using the Glasgow Outcome Scale and the modified Rankin Scale.

Results

The CRP levels in serum and CSF peaked on the 3rd postadmission day, and the CRP levels in CSF were always higher than the serum levels. Patients with lower admission GCS scores and higher Hunt and Hess and Fisher grades had statistically significantly higher levels of CRP in serum and CSF. Patients with angiographic vasospasm had higher CRP measurements in serum and CSF, in a statistically significant fashion (p < 0.0001). Additionally, patients with higher CRP levels in serum and CSF had less favorable outcome in this cohort.

Conclusions

Patients with aSAH who had high Hunt and Hess and Fisher grades and low GCS scores showed elevated CRP levels in their CSF and serum. Furthermore, patients developing angiographically proven vasospasm demonstrated significantly elevated CRP levels in serum and CSF, and increased CRP measurements were strongly associated with poor clinical outcome in this cohort.

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Kostas N. Fountas, Eftychia Z. Kapsalaki, Gregory P. Lee, Theofilos G. Machinis, Arthur A. Grigorian, Joe S. Robinson Jr., Ioannis Vergados and Panagiotis G. Theodosiadis

Object

The association of vitreous and/or subhyaloid hemorrhage with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) has been frequently identified since the original description by Terson in 1900. In this prospective clinical study the authors examined the actual incidence of Terson hemorrhage in patients suffering aneurysmal SAH, they attempted to identify those parameters that could predispose its development, and they evaluated its prognostic significance in the overall patients' outcome.

Methods

A total of 174 patients suffering aneurysmal SAH were included in this study. The admitting Glasgow Coma Scale scores (GCS), World Federation of Neurological Societies (WFNS) scale scores, Hunt and Hess grades, and Fisher grades were recorded. A careful ophthalmological evaluation was performed in all participants. The exact anatomical locations and the largest diameter of the dome of the ruptured aneurysms were also recorded. Surgical clipping or endovascular coiling was used in 165 patients. Clinical outcome was evaluated at discharge from the hospital by using the Glasgow Outcome Scale and the modified Rankin Scale. Periodic ophthalmological evaluations were performed for 2 years.

Results

In this series, the observed incidence of Terson hemorrhage was 12.1%. Statistical analysis of our data demonstrated that patients with low GCS scores and high WFNS scores, Hunt and Hess grades, and Fisher grades had an increased incidence of Terson hemorrhage. The mortality rate for patients with Terson hemorrhage was 28.6%, whereas that for patients without Terson hemorrhage was 2.0%. Moreover, patients with Terson hemorrhage who survived had significantly worse outcomes than those in patients without Terson hemorrhage.

Conclusions

Terson hemorrhage constitutes a common SAH-associated complication. Its incidence is increased in patients with low GCS and high WFNS scores, and high Hunt and Hess and Fisher grades. Its presence is associated with increased mortality and morbidity rates.