Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 2 of 2 items for

  • Author or Editor: Christopher F. Dowd x
  • By Author: Larsen, Donald W. x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Cameron G. McDougall, Van V. Halbach, Christopher F. Dowd, Randall T. Higashida, Donald W. Larsen and Grant B. Hieshima

✓ Preliminary experience using electrolytically detachable coils to treat basilar tip aneurysms in 33 patients is described. The most frequent presentation was subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) in 23 patients. All patients were referred after neurosurgical assessment and exclusion as candidates for surgical clipping of their aneurysms. At the time of initial treatment complete aneurysm occlusion was achieved in seven (21.2%) of 33 patients. In 17 of the patients (51.5%), greater than 90% but less than 100% aneurysm occlusion was achieved. Angiographic follow up (mean 11.7 months) was available in 19 patients. At follow-up angiography four (21%) of 19 aneurysms were 100% occluded and 12 (63.2%) of 19 were more than 90% but less than 100% occluded.

The mean clinical follow-up time in treated patients surviving beyond the initial treatment period is 15 months. One patient suffered major permanent morbidity from thrombosis of the basilar tip region a few hours after coil placement. One patient treated following SAH experienced further hemorrhage 6 months later. No other patient suffered direct or indirect permanent morbidity as a consequence of this method of treatment.

The authors believe that this technique is a reasonable alternative for patients who are not candidates for conventional surgical treatment or in whom such treatment has failed. This study's follow-up period is brief and greater experience with long-term follow-up study is mandatory.

Restricted access

Cameron G. McDougall, Van V. Halbach, Christopher F. Dowd, Randall T. Higashida, Donald W. Larsen and Grant B. Hieshima

Object. The purpose of this review is to describe the incidence, causes, management, and outcome of aneurysmal hemorrhage that occurred in patients during endovascular treatment with the Guglielmi detachable coil (GDC) system.

Methods. At the authors' institution between September 1991 and August 1995, more than 200 patients were treated using GDCs for intracranial aneurysms. The first 200 patients treated in this fashion were reviewed and all who experienced new subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) during the procedure were identified. Angiographic studies were also reviewed and patients were contacted for longer-term follow up when possible.

Four patients who experienced intraprocedural SAH were identified. The causes of hemorrhage were believed to be perforation of the aneurysm by the guidewire in one patient, perforation by the microcatheter in a second, and perforation by the delivery wire in a third. The fourth patient had a hemorrhage during injection of contrast material for control angiographic studies after placement of the final coil. One patient died, but the other three experienced no neurological symptoms or recovered without acquiring additional deficits. Overall a procedural hemorrhage rate of 2% was seen, with permanent morbidity and mortality rates of 0% and 0.5%, respectively.

Conclusions. Although SAH during endovascular treatment of intracranial aneurysms remains a significant risk, its incidence is low and a majority of patients can survive without serious sequelae.