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  • Author or Editor: Raymond Sawaya x
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  • By Author: Lang, Frederick F. x
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Giacomo G. Vecil, Dima Suki, Marcos V. C. Maldaun, Frederick F. Lang and Raymond SaWaya

Object. To date, no report has been published on outcomes of patients undergoing resection for brain metastases who were previously treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Consequently, the authors reviewed their institutional experience with this clinical scenario to assess the efficacy of surgical intervention.

Methods. Sixty-one patients (each harboring three or fewer brain lesions), who were treated at a single institution between June 1993 and August 2002 were identified. Patient charts and their neuroimaging and pathological reports were retrospectively reviewed to determine overall survival rates, surgical complications, and recurrence rates.

A univariate analysis revealed that patient preoperative recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) classification, primary disease status, preoperative Karnofsky Performance Scale score, type of focal treatment undergone for nonindex lesions, and major postoperative surgical complications were factors that significantly affected survival (p ≤ 0.05). In contrast, only the RPA class and focal (conventional surgery or SRS) treatment of nonindex lesions significantly (or nearly significantly) affected survival in the multivariate analysis. Major neurological complications occurred in only 2% of patients. The median time to distant recurrence after resection was 8.4 months; that to local recurrence was not reached. The overall median survival time was 11.1 months, with 25% of patients surviving 2 or more years. Conventional surgery facilitated tapering of steroid administration.

Conclusions. The complication, morbidity, survival, and recurrence rates are consistent with those seen after conventional surgery for recurrent brain metastases. Our results indicate that in selected patients with a favorable RPA class in whom nonindex lesions are treated with focal modalities, surgery can provide long-term control of SRS-treated lesions and positively affect overall survival.

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Joshua J. Chern, Andrew J. Tsung, William Humphries, Raymond Sawaya and Frederick F. Lang

Object

Intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) is a frequent complication found in leukemia patients with thrombocytopenia. At the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, when a leukemia patient is found to have ICH, a platelet transfusion is generally recommended until 50,000/μl is reached. The authors examine the feasibility and outcome of their intervention strategy in this study.

Methods

Records were reviewed from 76 consecutive leukemia patients with newly diagnosed ICH at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center from January 1, 2007, to December 31, 2009. Variables of interest included age, platelet count at presentation, leukemia subtype, history of trauma, Glasgow Coma Scale score at presentation, whether the 50,000/μl goal was reached after transfusion, and whether the patient was a transfusion responder (platelet count increase > 2000/μl/unit transfused). Outcome parameters were mortality rates at 72 hours and 30 days and imaging-documented hemorrhage progression.

Results

Thrombocytopenia was prevalent at the time of presentation (68 of 76 patients had platelet levels < 50,000/μl at presentation). Despite an aggressive transfusion protocol, only 24 patients reached the 50,000/μl target after an average of 16 units of transfusion. Death due to ICH occurred in 15 patients within the first 72 hours (mortality rate 19.7%). Death correlated with the presenting Glasgow Coma Scale score (p = 0.0075) but not with other transfusion-related parameters. A significant mortality rate was again observed after 30 days (32.7%). The 30-day mortality rate, however, was largely attributable to non-ICH related causes and correlated with patient age (p = 0.032) and whether the patient was a transfusion responder (p = 0.022). Reaching and maintaining a platelet count > 50,000/μl did not positively correlate with the 30-day mortality rate (p = 0.392 and 0.475, respectively).

Conclusions

Platelet transfusion in the setting of ICH in leukemia patients is undoubtedly necessary, but whether the transfusion threshold should be 50,000/μl remains unclear. Factors other than thrombocytopenia likely contribute to the overall poor prognosis.

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Sumeer Lal, Michel Lacroix, Philip Tofilon, Gregory N. Fuller, Raymond Sawaya and Frederick F. Lang

Object. To overcome the problems associated with using stereotactic techniques to establish intracranial xenografts in nude mice and to treat engrafted tumors with intratumoral therapies (such as gene or viral therapies), the authors developed an implantable guide-screw system. In this study, they describe the guide-screw system, its method of implantation, and their experience with establishing xenografts and delivering intratumoral therapy.

Methods. The system consists of a 2.6-mm guide screw with a central 0.5-mm diameter hole that accepts the 26-gauge needle of a Hamilton syringe. The screw is implanted into a small drill hole made 2.5 mm lateral and 1 mm anterior to the bregma. A stylet is used to cap the screw between treatments. Tumor cells or therapeutic agents are injected in a freehand fashion by using a Hamilton syringe and a 26-gauge needle fitted with a cuff to determine the depth of injection. To test this system, guide screws were successfully implanted in 44 (98%) of 45 nude mice. After 1 to 2 weeks of recovery, 38 mice were inoculated with U87MG cells and killed 5 days later. On histological studies in 37 (97%) of these animals, xenografts were evident within the caudate nucleus (mean diameter 2.5 mm). To determine whether injections into the center of an established xenograft could be reproducibly achieved with the guide-screw system, an adenovirus vector containing the β-galactosidase gene was injected 3 days after cell implantation in 15 of the mice. All of these animals demonstrated transduced cells within the tumor. To demonstrate that engrafted animals have a uniform survival time that is indicative of reproducible tumor growth, the survival of six mice was assessed after engraftment with U87MG cells. All six animals died within 28 to 35 days.

Conclusions. The guide-screw system allows a large number of animals to be rapidly and reproducibly engrafted and for intratumoral treatments to be accurately delivered into established xenografts.

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Frederick F. Lang, Raymond Sawaya, Dima Suki, Ian E. McCutcheon and Kenneth R. Hess

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Wael Hassaneen, Dima Suki, Abhijit L. Salaskar, David M. Wildrick, Frederick F. Lang, Gregory N. Fuller and Raymond Sawaya

Object

The aim of this study was to review the outcome of patients undergoing surgery for treatment of lateral-ventricle metastases.

Methods

Imaging information and chart reviews of operative reports were used to conduct a retrospective analysis in 29 patients who underwent resection of lateral-ventricle metastases at the authors' institution between 1993 and 2007. Clinical and neurosurgical outcomes and recurrence rates were studied.

Results

The mean patient age was 56 years (range 20–69 years); 66% of patients were male. Single intraventricular metastases occurred in 69% of patients, and 55% of them had systemic metastases. The 30-day postoperative mortality rate was 7%. There was intracerebral tumor recurrence in 41% of patients, with 1 patient undergoing a second operation for this. The median postoperative survival duration for 28 patients (excluding 1 patient with preoperative leptomeningeal disease) was 11.7 months; the 3- and 5-year survival rates were 17 and 11%, respectively. Univariate analysis identified factors significantly influencing survival, including the preoperative Karnofsky Performance Scale (KPS) score (p = 0.02), the number of cerebral metastases (p = 0.02), the presence of primary renal cell carcinoma (RCC) (p = 0.02), and the resection method (en bloc vs piecemeal; p = 0.05). The presence of extracranial metastases did not significantly influence survival. Multivariate analysis showed that the preoperative KPS score (p = 0.002), the presence of primary RCC (p = 0.039), and the resection method (en bloc vs piecemeal; p = 0.008) correlated significantly with survival time.

Conclusions

Surgery is an important component in the management of intraventricular metastases. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first study focusing totally on resection of lateral-ventricle metastases. The authors found that patients with primary RCC, those with a favorable preoperative KPS score, and those who underwent en bloc resection had a better outcome than others.

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Frederick F. Lang, Nancy E. Olansen, Franco DeMonte, Ziya L. Gokaslan, Eric C. Holland, Christopher Kalhorn and Raymond Sawaya

Object. Surgical resection of tumors located in the insular region is challenging for neurosurgeons, and few have published their surgical results. The authors report their experience with intrinsic tumors of the insula, with an emphasis on an objective determination of the extent of resection and neurological complications and on an analysis of the anatomical characteristics that can lead to suboptimal outcomes.

Methods. Twenty-two patients who underwent surgical resection of intrinsic insular tumors were retrospectively identified. Eight tumors (36%) were purely insular, eight (36%) extended into the temporal pole, and six (27%) extended into the frontal operculum. A transsylvian surgical approach, combined with a frontal opercular resection or temporal lobectomy when necessary, was used in all cases. Five of 13 patients with tumors located in the dominant hemisphere underwent craniotomies while awake. The extent of tumor resection was determined using volumetric analyses. In 10 patients, more than 90% of the tumor was resected; in six patients, 75 to 90% was resected; and in six patients, less than 75% was resected. No patient died within 30 days after surgery. During the immediate postoperative period, the neurological conditions of 14 patients (64%) either improved or were unchanged, and in eight patients (36%) they worsened. Deficits included either motor or speech dysfunction. At the 3-month follow-up examination, only two patients (9%) displayed permanent deficits. Speech and motor dysfunction appeared to result most often from excessive opercular retraction and manipulation of the middle cerebral artery (MCA), interruption of the lateral lenticulostriate arteries (LLAs), interruption of the long perforating vessels of the second segment of the MCA (M2), or violation of the corona radiata at the superior aspect of the tumor. Specific methods used to avoid complications included widely splitting the sylvian fissure and identifying the bases of the periinsular sulci to define the superior and inferior resection planes, identifying early the most lateral LLA to define the medial resection plane, dissecting the MCA before tumor resection, removing the tumor subpially with preservation of all large perforating arteries arising from posterior M2 branches, and performing craniotomy with brain stimulation while the patient was awake.

Conclusions. A good understanding of the surgical anatomy and an awareness of potential pitfalls can help reduce neurological complications and maximize surgical resection of insular tumors.

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Marcos V. C. Maldaun, Dima Suki, Frederick F. Lang, Sujit Prabhu, Weiming Shi, Gregory N. Fuller, David M. Wildrick and Raymond Sawaya

Object. The goal of this study was to determine whether the presence of a large tumor cyst was associated with improved outcome in patients undergoing surgery for newly diagnosed glioblastomas multiforme (GBMs) by comparing these patients with a matched cohort of patients with noncystic GBMs in clinical features, tumor imaging characteristics, survival, and time to tumor recurrence after surgery.

Methods. A retrospective analysis was conducted in 22 patients by using imaging information and chart reviews of operative reports of GBMs with large cysts (≥ 50% of tumor volume) at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center between 1993 and 2002. Clinical and neurosurgical outcomes and recurrence rates were studied. A statistical comparison was made with a matching cohort of 22 patients with noncystic GBMs.

No significant differences in clinical variables were found between the cohort with cystic GBMs and the matched cohort with noncystic GBMs. To avoid bias in preoperative assessment of tumor volume, the tumor burden was compared in patients whose tumors had cysts (excluding the cystic mass) and in patients whose tumors did not contain cysts. There was no statistically significant difference between the two groups (p = 0.8). In patients with cystic GBMs the median survival time after surgery was 18.2 months (95% confidence interval [CI] 11.9–24.5 months) and at 2 years 43% of the patients were still alive. In comparison, in patients with noncystic GBMs, the median survival time was 14.3 months (95% CI 12.1–16.4 months) and only 16% of patients were alive at 2 years. The median time to tumor recurrence was 7.6 months (95% CI 0.01–18 months) in patients harboring cystic GBMs and 4.2 months (95% CI 1.8–6.6 months) in the matched cohort (log-rank test, p = 0.04). In the cystic GBM group, no recurrence was observed in 53% of patients at 6 months, 45% at 1 year, and 38% at 2 years after surgery, whereas the corresponding numbers for the noncystic group were 36, 14, and 9%, respectively.

Conclusions. The results indicate that patients harboring a GBM that contains a large cyst survive longer and have a longer time to recurrence than those who lack such a cyst. This is the first such observation in the literature.

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Ziya L. Gokaslan, Julie E. York, Garrett L. Walsh, Ian E. McCutcheon, Frederick F. Lang, Joe B. Putnam Jr., David M. Wildrick, Stephen G. Swisher, Dima Abi-Said and Raymond Sawaya

Object. Anterior approaches to the spine for the treatment of spinal tumors have gained acceptance; however, in most published reports, patients with primary, metastatic, or chest wall tumors involving cervical, thoracic, or lumbar regions of the spine are combined. The purpose of this study was to provide a clear perspective of results that can be expected in patients who undergo anterior vertebral body resection, reconstruction, and stabilization for spinal metastases that are limited to the thoracic region.

Methods. Outcome is presented for 72 patients with metastatic spinal tumors who were treated by transthoracic vertebrectomy at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center. The predominant primary tumors included renal cancer in 19 patients, breast cancer in 10, melanoma or sarcoma in 10, and lung cancer in nine patients. The most common presenting symptoms were back pain, which occurred in 90% of patients, and lower-extremity weakness, which occurred in 64% of patients. All patients underwent transthoracic vertebrectomy, decompression, reconstruction with methylmethacrylate, and anterior fixation with locking plate and screw constructs. Supplemental posterior instrumentation was required in seven patients with disease involving the cervicothoracic or thoracolumbar junction, which was causing severe kyphosis. After surgery, pain improved in 60 of 65 patients. This improvement was found to be statistically significant (p < 0.001) based on visual analog scales and narcotic analgesic medication use. Thirty-five of the 46 patients who presented with neurological dysfunction improved significantly (p < 0.001) following the procedure. Thirty-three patients had weakness but could ambulate preoperatively. Seventeen of these 33 regained normal strength, 15 patients continued to have weakness, and one patient was neurologically worse postoperatively. Of the 13 preoperatively nonambulatory patients, 10 could walk after surgery and three were still unable to walk but showed improved motor function. Twenty-one patients had complications ranging from minor atelectasis to pulmonary embolism. The 30-day mortality rate was 3%. The 1-year survival rate for the entire study population was 62%.

Conclusions. These results suggest that transthoracic vertebrectomy and spinal stabilization can improve the quality of life considerably in cancer patients with spinal metastasis by restoring or preserving ambulation and by controlling intractable spinal pain with acceptable rates of morbidity and mortality.

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Akash J. Patel, Dima Suki, Mustafa Aziz Hatiboglu, Hiba Abouassi, Weiming Shi, David M. Wildrick, Frederick F. Lang and Raymond Sawaya

Object

Local recurrence (LR) of a resected brain metastasis occurs in up to 46% of patients. Postoperative whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) reduces that incidence. To isolate factors associated with the risk of LR after resection, the authors only studied patients who did not receive adjuvant radiotherapy.

Methods

The authors reviewed data from 570 cases involving patients who had undergone resection of a previously untreated single brain metastasis at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center between 1993 and 2006 without receiving postoperative WBRT. All tumors were measured preoperatively on MR images. The resection method (en bloc resection [EBR] or piecemeal resection [PMR]) was noted at the time of surgery. Predictors of LR were assessed using the Cox proportional hazards model.

Results

The median patient age was 58 years, 55% were male, and 88% had a Karnofsky Performance Scale Score ≥ 80. The most common primary cancers were those of the lung (28%), skin (melanoma, 21%), kidney (19%), and breast (11%). Piecemeal resection was performed in 201 patients (35%) and EBR in 369 (65%). Local recurrence developed in 84 patients (15%). The histological type of the primary cancer did not significantly predict LR; however, 7 of 22 patients with sarcoma developed LR (p = 0.16). The authors identified 2 variables that increased the risk of LR. Undergoing PMR carried a significantly higher LR risk than EBR (crude hazard ratio [HR] 1.7, 95% CI 1.1–2.6, p = 0.03). Tumors exceeding the median volume (9.7 cm3) had a significantly higher LR risk than those that were < 9.7 cm3 (crude HR 1.7; 95% CI 1.1–2.6; p = 0.02). In the multivariate analysis, small tumors removed by EBR had a significantly lower LR risk.

Conclusions

The LR risk of a single brain metastasis is influenced by biological factors (such as tumor volume) and treatments (such as the resection method). Early administration of postoperative WBRT may be particularly warranted when such negative tumor-related prognostic factors are noted or when treatment-related ones such as PMR are unavoidable.

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Brian J. Williams, Dima Suki, Benjamin D. Fox, Christopher E. Pelloski, Marcos V. C. Maldaun, Raymond E. Sawaya, Frederick F. Lang and Ganesh Rao

Object

Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is commonly used to treat brain metastases. Complications associated with this treatment are underreported. The authors reviewed a large series of patients who underwent SRS for brain metastases to identify complications and factors predicting their occurrence.

Methods

Prospectively collected clinical data from 273 patients undergoing SRS for 1 or 2 brain metastases at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center between June 1993 and December 2004 were reviewed. Patients who had received prior treatment for their tumor, including whole-brain radiation, SRS, or surgery, were excluded from the study. Data on adverse neurological and nonneurological outcomes following treatment were collected.

Results

Three hundred sixteen lesions were treated. Complications were associated with 127 (40%) of 316 treated lesions. New neurological complications were associated with 101 (32%) of 316 lesions. The onset of seizure was the most common complication, occurring in 41 (13%) of 316 SRS cases. On multivariate analysis, progressing primary cancer (hazard ratio [HR] = 2.4, 95% CI 1.6–3.6, p < 0.001), tumor location in eloquent cortex (HR = 2.3, 95% CI 1.6–3.4, p < 0.001), and lower (< 15 Gy) SRS dose (HR = 2.1, 95% CI 1.1–4.2, p = 0.04) were significantly associated with new complications. On multivariate analysis, a tumor location in the eloquent cortex (HR = 2.5, 95% CI 1.6–3.8, p < 0.001) and progressing primary cancer (HR = 1.6, 95% CI 1.1–2.5, p = 0.03) were significantly associated with new neurological complications.

Conclusions

The authors showed that new neurological and nonneurological complications were associated with 40% of SRS treatments for brain metastases. Patients with lesions in functional brain regions have a significantly increased risk of treatment-related complications.