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  • Author or Editor: Nobuhito Saito x
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Keisuke Maruyama, Masahiro Shin, Masao Tago, Hiroki Kurita, Nobutaka Kawahara, Akio Morita and Nobuhito Saito

Object

Appropriate management of hemorrhage after Gamma Knife surgery (GKS) for arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) of the brain is poorly understood, although a certain proportion of patients suffer from hemorrhage.

Methods

Among 500 patients observed for 1 to 183 months (median 70 months) after GKS, 32 patients (6.4%) suffered a hemorrhage. Hemorrhage developed even after angiographically documented obliteration of the AVM in five (2%) of 250 patients followed for 1 to 133 months (median 75 months) post-GKS. These patients had been treated according to their pathological condition. Treatment of these patients and their outcomes were retrospectively reviewed. As a management strategy in patients with preobliteration hemorrhage, the intracerebral hematoma and the AVM nidus were removed in four patients, and chronic encapsulated hematoma was removed in three. Among 11 patients who were conservatively treated, AVMs were ultimately obliterated in five, including three patients who underwent repeated GKS. Intracerebral hematoma from angiographically documented obliterated AVMs was radically resected in two patients, including one who also underwent aspiration of an accompanying symptomatic cyst. Intraoperative bleeding was easily controlled in these patients. Outcomes after hemorrhage, measured with the modified Rankin Scale, were significantly better in patients with postobliteration hemorrhage than in those with preobliteration hemorrhage (p < 0.05).

Conclusions

Various types of hemorrhagic complications after GKS for AVMs can be properly managed based on an understanding of each pathological condition. Although a small risk of bleeding remains after angiographically demonstrated obliteration, surgery for such AVMs is safe, and the patient outcomes are more favorable. Radical resection to prevent further hemorrhage is recommended for ruptured AVMs after obliteration because such AVMs can cause repeated hemorrhages.

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Kenichi Usami, Kensuke Kawai, Tomoyuki Koga, Masahiro Shin, Hiroki Kurita, Ichiro Suzuki and Nobuhito Saito

Object

Despite the controversy over the clinical significance of Gamma Knife surgery (GKS) for refractory mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE), the modality has attracted attention because it is less invasive than resection. The authors report long-term outcomes for 7 patients, focusing in particular on the long-term complications.

Methods

Between 1996 and 1999, 7 patients with MTLE underwent GKS. The 50% marginal dose covering the medial temporal structures was 18 Gy in 2 patients and 25 Gy in the remaining 5 patients.

Results

High-dose treatment abolished the seizures in 2 patients and significantly reduced them in 2 others. One patient in this group was lost to follow-up. However, 2 patients presented with symptomatic radiation necrosis (SRN) necessitating resection after 5 and 10 years. One patient who did not need necrotomy continued to show radiation necrosis on MRI after 10 years. One patient died of drowning while swimming in the sea 1 year after GKS, before seizures had disappeared completely.

Conclusions

High-dose treatment resulted in sufficient seizure control but carried a significant risk of SRN after several years. Excessive target volume was considered as a reason for delayed necrosis. Drawbacks such as a delay in seizure control and the risk of SRN should be considered when the clinical significance of this treatment is evaluated.