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  • Author or Editor: Hugh J. L. Garton x
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Wajd N. Al-Holou, Samuel Terman, Craig Kilburg, Hugh J. L. Garton, Karin M. Muraszko and Cormac O. Maher

Object

Arachnoid cysts are a frequent finding on intracranial imaging. The prevalence and natural history of these cysts in adults are not well defined.

Methods

We retrospectively reviewed the electronic medical records of a consecutive series of adults who underwent brain MRI over a 12-year interval to identify those with arachnoid cysts. The MRI studies were reviewed to confirm the diagnosis. For those patients with arachnoid cysts, we evaluated presenting symptoms, cyst size, and cyst location. Patients with more than 6 months' clinical and imaging follow-up were included in a natural history analysis.

Results

A total of 48,417 patients underwent brain MRI over the study period. Arachnoid cysts were identified in 661 patients (1.4%). Men had a higher prevalence than women (p < 0.0001). Multiple arachnoid cysts occurred in 30 patients. The most common locations were middle fossa (34%), retrocerebellar (33%), and convexity (14%). Middle fossa cysts were predominantly left-sided (70%, p < 0.001). Thirty-five patients were considered symptomatic and 24 underwent surgical treatment. Sellar and suprasellar cysts were more likely to be considered symptomatic (p < 0.0001). Middle fossa cysts were less likely to be considered symptomatic (p = 0.01. The criteria for natural history analysis were met in 203 patients with a total of 213 cysts. After a mean follow-up of 3.8 ± 2.8 years (for this subgroup), 5 cysts (2.3%) increased in size and 2 cysts decreased in size (0.9%). Only 2 patients developed new or worsening symptoms over the follow-up period.

Conclusions

Arachnoid cysts are a common incidental finding on intracranial imaging in all age groups. Although arachnoid cysts are symptomatic in a small number of patients, they are associated with a benign natural history for those presenting without symptoms.

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Wajd N. Al-Holou, Samuel W. Terman, Craig Kilburg, Hugh J. L. Garton, Karin M. Muraszko, William F. Chandler, Mohannad Ibrahim and Cormac O. Maher

Object

We reviewed our experience with pineal cysts to define the natural history and clinical relevance of this common intracranial finding.

Methods

The study population consisted of 48,417 consecutive patients who underwent brain MR imaging at a single institution over a 12-year interval and who were over 18 years of age at the time of imaging. Patient characteristics, including demographic data and other intracranial diagnoses, were collected from cases involving patients with a pineal cyst. We then identified all patients with pineal cysts who had been clinically evaluated at our institution and who had at least 6 months of clinical and imaging follow-up. All inclusion criteria for the natural history analysis were met in 151 patients.

Results

Pineal cysts measuring 5 mm or larger in greatest dimension were found in 478 patients (1.0%). Of these, 162 patients were male and 316 were female. On follow-up MR imaging of 151 patients with pineal cyst at a mean interval of 3.4 years from the initial study, 124 pineal cysts remained stable, 4 increased in size, and 23 decreased in size. Cysts that were larger at the time of initial diagnosis were more likely to decrease in size over the follow-up interval (p = 0.004). Patient sex, patient age at diagnosis, and the presence of septations within the cyst were not significantly associated with cyst change on follow-up.

Conclusions

Follow-up imaging and neurosurgical evaluation are not mandatory for adults with asymptomatic pineal cysts.