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Neurosurgical Forum: Letters to the editor To The Readership John A. Jane , M.D., Ph.D. Editor 765 765 On behalf of the Editorial Board and staff of the Journal of Neurosurgery , I am pleased to announce that effective with this issue (Volume 83, Number 4) nonmember subscription fulfillment services will be managed by our inhouse staff. I am aware that many subscribers have found the services provided by the private company that has been handling subscription fulfillment to be less than satisfactory and

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John A. Jane Sr.

T o T he R eadership : Proper attribution was not provided for the artwork appearing on the cover of the latest Gamma Knife supplement to the Journal of Neurosurgery ( Proceedings of the 13th International Meeting of the Leksell Gamma Knife® Society, December 2006, Volume 105, Supplement) and in smaller form (Fig. 1) in an article in that issue by Keep et al. (Keep MF, Mastrofrancesco L, Craig AD, Ashby LS: Gamma Knife surgery targeting the centromedian nucleus of the thalamus for the palliative management of thalamic pain: durable response in stroke

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Introduction

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John A. Jane Sr.

without the authors who submit to us work of such outstanding excellence. Second, the peer review at the Journal of Neurosurgery is exceptional. It is conducted by a relatively small number of board members who shoulder a heavy volume of papers. During their terms of service, board members read thousands of submitted papers; through the sequential review process they also read each other's assessments of the studies they review. These experiences make Journal of Neurosurgery board members the best informed and most accountable reviewers in academic publishing

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John A. Jane

T his issue marks the 50th anniversary of the first publication of the Journal of Neurosurgery , in January, 1944. We will celebrate this significant event throughout the year, as we include articles on the history of the Journal and on some of the people who were essential to its development. We will reprint some of the articles from the first volume, with commentaries from the authors, and review the role played by the Journal in the development of neurosurgery over the last 50 years. We will also publish some of the reminiscences of those who were

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Lucia Schwyzer, Robert M. Starke, John A. Jane Jr. and Edward H. Oldfield

patients with acromegaly caused by GH-secreting tumors. We explored the possibility that if individual tumors have their own intrinsic level of GH production and if that level of GH production is homogeneous across the tumor, a comparison of GH levels before and after surgery would indicate the fraction of tumor that had been removed. Thus, a close correlation between tumor volume and hormone secretion in individual patients would permit calculation of the fraction of tumor removed by surgery, simply by measuring the postoperative GH levels. Methods We assessed

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I. Jonathan Pomeraniec, Aaron E. Bond, M. Beatriz Lopes and John A. Jane Sr.

identification of patients with NPH most likely to benefit from shunting procedures remains difficult. 8 , 17 , 21 Marmarou et al. performed a literature review and found that the sensitivity of predicting successful outcomes based on clinical and imaging findings alone can be as low as 46%. The addition of high-volume lumbar puncture (HVLP) yielded a sensitivity of 26%–61%, and CSF outflow resistance studies had sensitivities of 57%–100%. 10 Neurological comorbidities like Alzheimer’s disease (AD) have been hypothesized to hinder shunt responsiveness in patients with NPH

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Patrick F. Golden and John A. Jane

D espite intensive clinical and experimental investigation of shock and the mechanism of so-called “irreversibility,” there is as yet no adequate explanation of the fact that an organism subjected to a critical level and duration of hypovolemia will not survive even if volume is restored. As has been established by Lillehei, et al., 8 the mortality rate associated with 4 hours of hemorrhagic shock at 35 mm Hg mean arterial pressure (MAP) is 90%. The reasons given for this high rate include defects in metabolism, circulating toxins, or the failure of a

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Robert M. Starke, Brian J. Williams, John A. Jane Jr. and Jason P. Sheehan

defined as a 15% or greater change in tumor volume as compared with the volume at the time of GKS. 37 To make this determination of tumor size, the tumor was outlined on radiographic images, and serial volumetric calculations were performed using the ImageJ program (NIH; http://rsb.info.nih.gov/ij/ ) in all patient imaging studies. 37 Any patient with tumor progression of more than 15% was considered a treatment failure, even if this progression stabilized with further GKS or microsurgery. Statistical Analysis Data are presented as median or mean and range for

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Davis G. Taylor, Panagiotis Mastorakos, John A. Jane Jr. and Edward H. Oldfield

I t has been recognized for many years that some patients with the Chiari I malformation have a congenitally reduced posterior fossa volume (PFV). Several radiographic analyses demonstrate, on average, reduced linear and volumetric measurements of the posterior fossa in patients with Chiari I malformation compared with controls. 1–3 , 10 , 18 , 28 The reduced size of the posterior fossa appears to be most significant at an early age and becomes less disproportionate with increasing age. 3 , 31 It has been postulated that in patients with a disproportionally

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John Persing, John A. Jane Jr. and John A. Jane Sr.

. Interesting observations have also been made regarding intracranial volume in patients with craniosynostosis. The usual interpretation is that the pathology of craniosynostosis, including intracranial volume, will be reduced if there is a fused suture due to the constricting bone capsule for brain development, but this has not been found to be the case consistently, at least in sagittal synostosis (other forms of craniosynostosis have not yet been completely analyzed). In fact, in sagittal synostosis, patients begin with a relatively normal intracranial volume, 1 but as