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  • Author or Editor: Charles A. Sansur x
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Charles A. Sansur, Kai-Ming G. Fu, Rod J. Oskouian Jr., Jay Jagannathan, Charles Kuntz iv and Christopher I. Shaffrey

✓ Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is an inflammatory rheumatic disease whose primary effect is on the axial skeleton, causing sagittal-plane deformity at both the thoracolumbar and cervicothoracic junctions. In the present review article the authors discuss current concepts in the preoperative planning of patients with AS. The authors also review current techniques used to treat sagittal-plane deformity, focusing on pedicle subtraction osteotomy at the thoracolumbar junction, as well as cervical extension osteotomy at the cervicothoracic junction.

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Jay Jagannathan, Christopher I. Shaffrey, Rod J. Oskouian, Aaron S. Dumont, Christian Herrold, Charles A. Sansur and John A. Jane Sr.

Object

Although the clinical outcomes following anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) surgery are generally good, 2 major complications are graft migration and nonunion. These complications have led some to advocate rigid internal fixation and/or cervical immobilization postoperatively. This paper examines a single-surgeon experience with single-level ACDF without use of plates or hard collars in patients with degenerative spondylosis in whom allograft was used as the fusion material.

Methods

The authors conducted a retrospective review of a prospective database of (Cloward-type) ACDF operations performed by the senior author (J.A.J.) between July 1996 and June 2005. Radiographic follow-up included static and flexion/extension radiographs obtained to assess fusion, focal and segmental kyphosis, and change in disc space height. At most recent follow-up, the patients' condition was evaluated by an independent physician examiner. The Odom criteria and Neck Disability Index (NDI) were used to assess outcome.

Results

One hundred seventy patients underwent single-level ACDF for degenerative pathology during the study period. Their most common presenting symptoms were pain, weakness, and radiculopathy; 88% of patients noted ≥ 2 neurological complaints. The mean hospital stay was 1.76 days (range 0–36 days), and 3 patients (2%) had major immediate postoperative complications requiring reoperation. The mean duration of follow-up was 22 months (range 12–124 months). Radiographic evidence of fusion was present in 160 patients (94%). Seven patients (4%) showed radiographic evidence of pseudarthrosis, and graft migration was seen in 3 patients (2%). All patients had increases in focal kyphosis at the operated level on postoperative radiographs (mean −7.4°), although segmental alignment was preserved in 133 patients (78%). Mean change in disc space height was 36.5% (range 28–53%). At most recent clinical follow-up, 122 patients (72%) had no complaints referable to cervical disease and were able to carry out their activities of daily living without impairment. The mean postoperative NDI score was 3.2 (median 3, range 0–31).

Conclusions

Single-level ACDF without intraoperative plate placement or the use of a postoperative collar is an effective treatment for cervical spondylosis. Although there is evidence of focal kyphosis and loss of disc space height, radiographic evidence of fusion is comparable to that attained with plate fixation, and the rate of clinical improvement is high.

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Jay Jagannathan, Ekawut Chankaew, Peter Urban, Aaron S. Dumont, Charles A. Sansur, John Kern, Benjamin Peeler, W. Jeffrey Elias, Francis Shen, Mark E. Shaffrey, Richard Whitehill, Vincent Arlet and Christopher I. Shaffrey

Object

In this paper, the authors review the functional and cosmetic outcomes and complications in 300 patients who underwent treatment for lumbar spine disease via either an anterior paramedian or conventional anterolateral retroperitoneal approach.

Methods

Seven surgeons performed anterior lumbar surgeries in 300 patients between August 2004 and December 2006. One hundred and eighty patients were treated with an anterior paramedian approach, and 120 patients with an anterolateral retroperitoneal approach. An access surgeon was used in 220 cases (74%). Postoperative evaluation in all patients consisted of clinic visits, assessment with the modified Scoliosis Research Society–30 instrument, as well as a specific questionnaire relating to wound appearance and patient satisfaction with the wound.

Results

At a mean follow-up of 31 months (range 12–47 months), the mean Scoliosis Research Society–30 score (out of 25) was 21.2 in the patients who had undergone the anterior paramedian approach and 19.4 in those who had undergone the anterolateral retroperitoneal approach (p = 0.005). The largest differences in quality of life measures were observed in the areas of pain control (p = 0.001), self-image (p = 0.004), and functional activity (p = 0.003), with the anterior paramedian group having higher scores in all 3 categories. Abdominal bulging in the vicinity of the surgical site was the most common wound complication observed and was reported by 22 patients in the anterolateral retroperitoneal group (18%), and 2 patients (1.1%) in the anterior paramedian group. Exposures of ≥ 3 levels with the anterolateral approach were associated with abdominal bulging (p = 0.04), while 1- or 2-level exposures were not (p > 0.05). Overall satisfaction with incisional appearance was higher in patients with an anterior paramedian incision (p = 0.001) and with approaches performed by an access surgeon (p = 0.004).

Conclusions

Patients who undergo an anterior paramedian approach to the lumbar spine have a higher quality of life and better cosmetic outcomes than patients undergoing an anterolateral retroperitoneal approach.