Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 3 of 3 items for

  • Author or Editor: Rudolf Fahlbusch x
  • By Author: Huk, Walter x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Rudolf Fahlbusch, Jürgen Honegger, Werner Paulus, Walter Huk and Michael Buchfelder

Object. The goal of this study was to assess the outcome of surgical management in 168 consecutive patients harboring craniopharyngiomas treated between January 1983 and April 1997.

Methods. In 148 patients undergoing initial (primary) surgery, the pterional approach was most frequently used (39.2%), followed by the transsphenoidal approach (23.6%). For large retrochiasmatic craniopharyngiomas, the bifrontal interhemispheric approach was used increasingly over the pterional approach and led to improved surgical results. Total tumor removal was accomplished in 45.7% of transcranial and 85.7% of transsphenoidal procedures. The main reasons for incomplete removal were attachment to and/or infiltration of the hypothalamus, major calcifications, and attachment to vascular structures. The success rate in total tumor removal was inferior in the cases of tumor recurrence. The operative mortality rate in transcranial surgery was 1.1% in primary cases and 10.5% in cases of tumor recurrence. No patient died in the group that underwent transsphenoidal surgery. The rate of recurrence-free survival after total removal was 86.9% at 5 years and 81.3% at 10 years. In contrast, the 5-year recurrence-free survival rate was only 48.8% after subtotal removal and 41.5% after partial removal. Following primary surgery, the actuarial survival rate was 92.7% at 10 years, with the best results after complete tumor removal. At last follow up, 117 (79%) of 148 patients who underwent primary surgery were independent and without impairment.

Conclusions. Total tumor removal while avoiding hazardous intraoperative manipulation provides favorable early results and a high rate of long-term control in craniopharyngiomas.

Full access

Rudolf Fahlbusch, Jürgen Honegger, Werner Paulus, Walter Huk and Michael Buchfelder

The surgical management of 168 consecutive patients harboring craniopharyngiomas treated between January 1983 and April 1997 is described. In 148 patients undergoing initial (primary) surgery, the pterional approach was most frequently used (39.2%) followed by the transsphenoidal approach (23.6%). For large retrochiasmatic craniopharyngiomas, the bifrontal interhemispheric approach was used increasingly over the pterional approach and led to improved surgical results. Total tumor removal was accomplished in 45.7% of transcranial and 85.7% of transsphenoidal procedures. The main reasons for incomplete removal were attachment and/or infiltration of the hypothalamus, major calcifications, and attachment to vascular structures. The success rate in total tumor removal was inferior in the cases of tumor recurrence. The operative mortality rate in transcranial surgery was 1.1% in primary cases and 10.5% in cases of tumor recurrence. No patient died in the group undergoing transsphenoidal surgery. The rate of recurrence-free survival after total removal was 86.9% at 5 years and 81.3% at 10 years. In contrast, the 5-year recurrence-free survival rate was only 48.8% after subtotal removal and 41.5% after partial removal. Following primary surgery, the actuarial survival rate was 92.7% at 10 years, with the best results after complete tumor removal. At last follow up, 117 (79%) of 148 patients who underwent primary surgery were independent and without impairment.

Total tumor removal while avoiding hazardous intraoperative manipulation provides favorable early results and a high rate of long-term control in craniopharyngiomas.

Restricted access

Ramin Naraghi, Peter Hastreiter, Bernd Tomandl, Agatha Bonk, Walter Huk and Rudolf Fahlbusch

Object. The goal of this study was to describe the authors' technique for three-dimensional (3D) visualization of neurovascular relationships in the posterior fossa at the surface of the brainstem. This technique is based on the processing of high-resolution magnetic resonance (MR) imaging data. The principles and technical details involved in the accurate simultaneous visualization of vessels and cranial nerves as tiny structures are presented using explicit and implicit segmentation as well as volume rendering.

Methods. In this approach 3D MR constructive interference in steady state imaging data served as the source for image processing, which was performed using the Linux-based software tools SegMed for segmentation and Qvis for volume rendering. A sequence of filtering operations (including noise reduction and closing) and other software tools such as volume growing are used for a semiautomatic coarse segmentation. The subsequent 3D visualization in which implicit segmentation is used for the differentiation of cranial nerves, vessels, and brainstem is achieved by allocating opacity and color values and adjusting the related transfer functions. This method was applied to the presurgical evaluation in a consecutive series of 55 patients with neurovascular compression syndromes and the results were correlated to surgical findings. The potential for its use, further developments, and remaining problems are discussed.

Conclusions. This method provides an excellent intraoperative real-time virtual view of difficult anatomical relationships.