Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 19 items for :

  • "sagittal alignment" x
  • By Author: Hostin, Richard x
Clear All
Full access

Emmanuelle Ferrero, Barthelemy Liabaud, Jensen K. Henry, Christopher P. Ames, Khaled Kebaish, Gregory M. Mundis, Richard Hostin, Munish C. Gupta, Oheneba Boachie-Adjei, Justin S. Smith, Robert A. Hart, Ibrahim Obeid, Bassel G. Diebo, Frank J. Schwab and Virginie Lafage

timing of revision surgery (up to 2 years postoperatively). Radiographic Measurement Radiographs were analyzed using validated software (Spineview, ENSAM Paris-Tech). 34 Sagittal spinopelvic radiographic parameters included cervical lordosis, T2–12 thoracic kyphosis (TK), LL, PI-LL mismatch, and pelvic parameters (PI, PT, and sacral slope). 46 Global sagittal alignment parameters included SVA and T-1 spinopelvic inclination (T1SPi) ( Fig. 1 ). The 3CO resection angle was defined as the change in the angle formed by the upper endplate of the vertebra below the 3CO and

Restricted access

Justin S. Smith, Christopher I. Shaffrey, Virginie Lafage, Benjamin Blondel, Frank Schwab, Richard Hostin, Robert Hart, Brian O'Shaughnessy, Shay Bess, Serena S. Hu, Vedat Deviren, Christopher P. Ames and International Spine Study Group

P ositive sagittal malalignment (defined as anterior deviation of the C-7 plumb line >5 cm from the posterior superior corner of S-1) is recognized as a cause of pain and disability in cases of ASD. 8 , 20 , 28 , 30 , 31 Poor sagittal alignment has been shown to require increased energy expenditure, and multiple compensatory measures have been described, including knee flexion, pelvic retroversion, and thoracic hypokyphosis. 20 , 30 , 31 Surgical correction of positive sagittal malalignment has been correlated with significant improvement in health

Full access

Renaud Lafage, Ibrahim Obeid, Barthelemy Liabaud, Shay Bess, Douglas Burton, Justin S. Smith, Cyrus Jalai, Richard Hostin, Christopher I. Shaffrey, Christopher Ames, Han Jo Kim, Eric Klineberg, Frank Schwab, Virginie Lafage and the International Spine Study Group

levels above UIV. Statistical Analysis The collected demographic, surgical, and radiographic data were described and analyzed at baseline and immediate postoperative follow-up. Changes in radiographic alignment were also investigated, including a preoperative to postoperative analysis of sagittal alignment and the rate of radiographic PJK. Patients were stratified into 5 groups based on the preoperative to postoperative degree of change in LL: decrease in LL (kyphotic change > 5°), stable (change between −5° and 5°), 5°–15° increase (lordotic change of 5°–15°), 15

Full access

Blake N. Staub, Renaud Lafage, Han Jo Kim, Christopher I. Shaffrey, Gregory M. Mundis Jr., Richard Hostin, Douglas Burton, Lawrence Lenke, Munish C. Gupta, Christopher Ames, Eric Klineberg, Shay Bess, Frank Schwab, Virginie Lafage and the International Spine Study Group

M uch has been written on the relationship between patient-reported outcomes and sagittal alignment in thoracolumbar deformities. 5–8 , 12 , 17 , 18 , 23 Although simple equations were initially used to identify thoracolumbar deformities, more recently, patient-specific formulas have been developed to more specifically quantify each deformity. 10 , 22 However, cervical spine studies have yet to define a fundamental equation, let alone patient-specific descriptors, that both elucidate a deformity and suggest a nidus for correction. The cervical sagittal

Restricted access

Virginie Lafage, Frank Schwab, Shaleen Vira, Robert Hart, Douglas Burton, Justin S. Smith, Oheneba Boachie-Adjei, Alexis Shelokov, Richard Hostin, Christopher I. Shaffrey, Munish Gupta, Behrooz A. Akbarnia, Shay Bess and Jean-Pierre Farcy

S pinal deformity in the adult is commonly a 3D pathology. However, evidence points toward the clinical impact of deformity being mostly related to the sagittal plane, with little correlation between coronal deformity and self-reported disability. The Classification of Adult Deformity 20 was primarily built on clinical impact parameters, and it highlights lumbar lordosis as well as global sagittal alignment. Work leading to the classification did not identify a significant clinical impact of coronal plane parameters. 20 Additionally, in the commonly known

Free access

Christopher P. Ames, Justin S. Smith, Robert Eastlack, Donald J. Blaskiewicz, Christopher I. Shaffrey, Frank Schwab, Shay Bess, Han Jo Kim, Gregory M. Mundis Jr., Eric Klineberg, Munish Gupta, Michael O’Brien, Richard Hostin, Justin K. Scheer, Themistocles S. Protopsaltis, Kai-Ming G. Fu, Robert Hart, Todd J. Albert, K. Daniel Riew, Michael G. Fehlings, Vedat Deviren, Virginie Lafage and International Spine Study Group

posterosuperior corner of the C-7 vertebral body. The horizontal line with an arrow represents the C2–7 SVA. Given the significant impact of sagittal alignment on HRQOL among patients with thoracolumbar spinal deformities, and the studies of Tang et al. 54 and Smith et al. 45 demonstrating correlations between cervical sagittal alignment and multiple measures of HRQOL, the C2–7 SVA was selected as a modifier for the CSD classification. Based on regression analysis from Tang et al., a C2–7 SVA threshold of 4 cm was found to correlate with moderate disability based on the

Free access

Justin S. Smith, Christopher I. Shaffrey, Virginie Lafage, Frank Schwab, Justin K. Scheer, Themistocles Protopsaltis, Eric Klineberg, Munish Gupta, Richard Hostin, Kai-Ming G. Fu, Gregory M. Mundis Jr., Han Jo Kim, Vedat Deviren, Alex Soroceanu, Robert A. Hart, Douglas C. Burton, Shay Bess, Christopher P. Ames and the International Spine Study Group

Slover J , Abdu WA , Hanscom B , Weinstein JN : The impact of comorbidities on the change in short-form 36 and Oswes-try scores following lumbar spine surgery . Spine (Phila Pa 1976) 31 : 1974 – 1980 , 2006 41 Smith JS , Bess S , Shaffrey CI , Burton DC , Hart RA , Hostin R , : Dynamic changes of the pelvis and spine are key to predicting postoperative sagittal alignment after pedicle subtraction osteotomy: a critical analysis of preoperative planning techniques . Spine (Phila Pa 1976) 37 : 845 – 853 , 2012 42 Smith JS , Fu

Restricted access

Justin S. Smith, Ellen Shaffrey, Eric Klineberg, Christopher I. Shaffrey, Virginie Lafage, Frank J. Schwab, Themistocles Protopsaltis, Justin K. Scheer, Gregory M. Mundis Jr., Kai-Ming G. Fu, Munish C. Gupta, Richard Hostin, Vedat Deviren, Khaled Kebaish, Robert Hart, Douglas C. Burton, Breton Line, Shay Bess, Christopher P. Ames and The International Spine Study Group

fracture, the retrospective study suggested that residual postoperative sagittal malalignment and greater BMI may be associated with greater risk of rod fracture. The present prospective study confirms the added risk of rod fracture with greater BMI and confirms that sagittal spinopelvic alignment may also be a risk factor, but instead of postoperative residual sagittal malalignment, the present study suggests that it is the magnitude of sagittal alignment correction that may be a more important factor. The findings of the present study demonstrate a markedly higher

Full access

Joshua Bakhsheshian, Justin K. Scheer, Jeffrey L. Gum, Richard Hostin, Virginie Lafage, Shay Bess, Themistocles S. Protopsaltis, Douglas C. Burton, Malla Kate Keefe, Robert A. Hart, Gregory M. Mundis Jr., Christopher I. Shaffrey, Frank Schwab, Justin S. Smith, Christopher P. Ames and The International Spine Study Group

OBJECTIVE

Mental disease burden can have a significant impact on levels of disability and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) measures. Therefore, the authors investigated the significance of mental health status in adults with spinal deformity and poor physical function.

METHODS

A retrospective analysis of a prospective multicenter database of 365 adult spinal deformity (ASD) patients who had undergone surgical treatment was performed. Health-related QOL variables were examined preoperatively and at the 2-year postoperative follow-up. Patients were grouped by their 36-Item Short Form Health Survey mental component summary (MCS) and physical component summary (PCS) scores. Both groups had PCS scores ≤ 25th percentile for matched norms; however, the low mental health (LMH) group consisted of patients with an MCS score ≤ 25th percentile, and the high mental health (HMH) group included patients with an MCS score ≥ 75th percentile.

RESULTS

Of the 264 patients (72.3%) with a 2-year follow-up, 104 (28.5%) met the inclusion criteria for LMH and 40 patients (11.0%) met those for HMH. The LMH group had a significantly higher overall rate of comorbidities, specifically leg weakness, depression, hypertension, and self-reported neurological and psychiatric disease processes, and were more likely to be unemployed as compared with the HMH group (p < 0.05 for all). The 2 groups had similar 2-year postoperative improvements in HRQOL (p > 0.05) except for the greater improvements in the MCS and the Scoliosis Research Society-22r questionnaire (SRS-22r) mental domain (p < 0.05) in the LMH group and greater improvements in PCS and SRS-22r satisfaction and back pain domains (p < 0.05) in the HMH group. The LMH group had a higher rate of reaching a minimal clinically important difference (MCID) on the SRS-22r mental domain (p < 0.01), and the HMH group had a higher rate of reaching an MCID on the PCS and SRS-22r activity domain (p < 0.05). On multivariable logistic regression, having LMH was a significant independent predictor of failure to reach an MCID on the PCS (p < 0.05). At the 2-year postoperative follow-up, 14 LMH patients (15.1%) were categorized as HMH. Two LMH patients (2.2%), and 3 HMH patients (7.7%) transitioned to a PCS score ≥ 75th percentile for age- and sex-matched US norms (p < 0.01).

CONCLUSIONS

While patients with poor mental and physical health, according to their MCS and PCS scores, have higher medical comorbidity and unemployment rates, they still demonstrate significant improvements in HRQOL measurements postoperatively. Both LMH and HMH patient groups demonstrated similar improvements in most HRQOL domains, except that the LMH patients had difficulties in obtaining improvements in the PCS domain.

Full access

Taemin Oh, Justin K. Scheer, Robert Eastlack, Justin S. Smith, Virginie Lafage, Themistocles S. Protopsaltis, Eric Klineberg, Peter G. Passias, Vedat Deviren, Richard Hostin, Munish Gupta, Shay Bess, Frank Schwab, Christopher I. Shaffrey and Christopher P. Ames

A dult spinal deformity (ASD) is a pathological condition defined as spinal malalignment in the axial, coronal, or sagittal plane and is derivative of congenital, iatrogenic, degenerative, or idiopathic etiology. 30 The restoration of sagittal alignment, as established by the sagittal vertical axis (SVA; target < 5 cm) and pelvic tilt (PT; target < 20°) on sagittal radiography, is important in surgical deformity correction. 6 , 21 , 22 Although coronal plane correction also has clinical relevance, sagittal corrections appear to have greater importance, 5