Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 3 of 3 items for

  • Author or Editor: Howard Yonas x
  • By Author: Horowitz, Michael B. x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Joseph T. King Jr., Michael B. Horowitz, Amin B. Kassam, Howard Yonas and Mark S. Roberts

Object. Cerebral aneurysms can affect a patient's health status by rupture and stroke, impingement on neural structures, treatment side effects, or psychological stress. The authors assessed the performance, validity, and reliability of the Short Form—12 (SF-12), a self-administered written survey instrument, to assess health status in patients with cerebral aneurysms.

Methods. A cohort of 170 patients with cerebral aneurysms who were seen at a neurosurgery clinic underwent structured interviews including measurement of their health statuses (SF-12 physical component summary [PCS] and mental component summary [MCS]), functional status (Glasgow Outcome Scale score, modified Rankin Scale score, and Barthel Index), and mental health (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale score). The SF-12 scores were compared with US population norms by performing t-tests with unequal variances. The validity of the SF-12 was assessed by comparing the PCS and MCS scores with each patient's functional status and mental health scores by using rank-order methods. Inter-item reliability was assessed using the Cronbach alpha statistic.

Patients with cerebral aneurysms had decreased health status PCS and MCS scores when compared with population norms (p < 0.001 for all). A history of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) (p = 0.006) and previous surgical or endovascular treatment (p = 0.047) was associated with worse PCS scores. The validity of the SF-12 was supported by the relationship between the PCS and MCS scores and the patient's functional status and mental health (p < 0.001 for all). The reliability of the SF-12 was documented by the Cronbach alpha statistic (α = 0.76).

Conclusions. Patients with cerebral aneurysms have a diminished physical and mental health status as measured using the SF-12. The presence of SAH and aneurysm treatment are associated with a worse physical health status. The SF-12 is a valid and reliable instrument for measuring health status in patients with cerebral aneurysms.

Restricted access

Joseph T. King Jr., Amin B. Kassam, Howard Yonas, Michael B. Horowitz and Mark S. Roberts

Object. Aneurysm disease and its treatment can have an adverse impact on mental health, yet the affects of cerebral aneurysms on general mental health, anxiety, and depression are poorly understood.

Methods. Patients with cerebral aneurysms who were seen at a neurosurgery clinic underwent a structured interview, completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and the Medical Outcomes Study 12-item Short Form Health Survey (providing a mental component summary [MCS] score for general mental health), and were assigned functional status scores based on the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS), Rankin Scale, and Barthel Index. Rank-order methods were used to assess the relationship between mental health, aneurysm characteristics and history, and functional status. Data were collected in 166 patients (71% women) with a mean age of 53.7 years. Depression was present in 8% of the study population and an anxiety disorder in 17%. Patients with both an unsecured aneurysm and a history of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) tended toward higher anxiety scores (p = 0.086). Higher depression scores were associated with a decreased functional status on the GOS (p = 0.015) and Rankin Scale (p = 0.010). The mean 6 standard deviation adjusted MCS score (37.9 ± 7.1) was significantly less than that of the US population (p < 0.001). Lower MCS scores were associated with a decreased functional status on the GOS (p = 0.052), Rankin Scale (p < 0.001), and Barthel Index (p = 0.002).

Conclusions. Patients with cerebral aneurysms have increased levels of anxiety and depression and poor general mental health. Those who have experienced an SAH and harbor an unsecured cerebral aneurysm demonstrate increased levels of anxiety. A lower functional status in patients with aneurysms is associated with depression and decreased general mental health.

Restricted access

Martina Stippler, Elizabeth Crago, Elad I. Levy, Mary E. Kerr, Howard Yonas, Michael B. Horowitz and Amin Kassam

Object

Despite the application of current standard therapies, vasospasm continues to result in death or major disability in patients treated for ruptured aneurysms. The authors investigated the effectiveness of continous MgSO4 infusion for vasospasm prophylaxis.

Methods

Seventy-six adults (mean age 54.6 years; 71% women; 92% Caucasian) were included in this comparative matched-cohort study of patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage on the basis of computed tomography (CT) findings. Thirty-eight patients who received continuous MgSO4 infusion were matched for age, race, sex, treatment option, Fisher grade, and Hunt and Hess grade to 38 historical control individuals who did not receive MgSO4 infusion. Twelve grams of MgSO4 in 500 ml normal saline was given intravenously daily for 12 days if the patient presented within 48 hours of aneurysm rupture. Vasospasm was diagnosed on the basis of digital substraction angiography, CT angiography, and transcranial Doppler ultrasonography, and evidence of neurological deterioration.

Symptomatic vasospasm was present at a significantly lower frequency in patients who received MgSO4 infusion (18%) compared with patients who did not receive MgSO4 (42%) (p = 0.025). There was no significant difference in mortality rate at discharge (p = 0.328). A trend toward improved outcome as measured by the modifed Rankin Scale (p = 0.084), but not the Glasgow Outcome Scale (p = 1.0), was seen in the MgSO4-treated group.

Conclusions

Analysis of the results suggests that MgSO4 infusion may have a role in cerebral vasospasm prophylaxis if therapy is initiated within 48 hours of aneurysm rupture.