Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 2 of 2 items for

  • Author or Editor: Koji Iihara x
  • By Author: Hamano, Eika x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Tao Yang, Yoshifumi Higashino, Hiroharu Kataoka, Eika Hamano, Daisuke Maruyama, Koji Iihara and Jun C. Takahashi

OBJECTIVE

Hyperperfusion syndrome (HPS) is a notable complication that causes various neurological symptoms after superficial temporal artery (STA)–middle cerebral artery (MCA) bypass surgery for moyamoya disease (MMD). The authors used intraoperative indocyanine green (ICG) videoangiography to measure the change in microvascular transit time (MVTT) after bypass surgery. An analysis was then conducted to identify the correlation between change in MVTT and presence of postoperative HPS.

METHODS

This study included 105 hemispheres of 81 patients with MMD who underwent STA-MCA single bypass surgery between January 2010 and January 2015. Intraoperative ICG videoangiography was performed before and after bypass surgery. The MVTT was calculated from the ICG time intensity curve recorded in the pial arterioles and venules. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was conducted to test the effect of multiple variables, including the change in MVTT after bypass surgery, on postoperative HPS.

RESULTS

Postoperative HPS developed in 28 (26.7%) of the 105 hemispheres operated on. MVTT was reduced significantly after bypass surgery (prebypass 5.34 ± 2.00 sec vs postbypass 4.12 ± 1.60 sec; p < 0.001). The difference between prebypass and postbypass MVTT values, defined as ΔMVTT, was significantly greater in the HPS group than in the non-HPS group (2.55 ± 2.66 sec vs 0.75 ± 1.78 sec; p < 0.001). Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis revealed that the optimal cutoff point of ΔMVTT was 2.6 seconds (sensitivity 46.4% and specificity 85.7% as a predictor of postoperative HPS). A ΔMVTT > 2.6 seconds was an independent predictor of HPS in multivariate analysis (hazard ratio 4.88, 95% CI 1.76–13.57; p = 0.002).

CONCLUSIONS

MVTT in patients with MMD was reduced significantly after bypass surgery. Patients with a ΔMVTT > 2.6 seconds tended to develop postoperative HPS. Because ΔMVTT can be easily measured during surgery, it is a useful diagnostic tool for identifying patients at high risk for HPS after STA-MCA bypass surgery for MMD.

Full access

Eika Hamano, Hiroharu Kataoka, Naomi Morita, Daisuke Maruyama, Tetsu Satow, Koji Iihara and Jun C. Takahashi

OBJECTIVE

Transient neurological symptoms are frequently observed during the early postoperative period after direct bypass surgery for moyamoya disease. Abnormal signal changes in the cerebral cortex can be seen in postoperative MR images. The purpose of this study was to reveal the radiological features of the “cortical hyperintensity belt (CHB) sign” in postoperative FLAIR images and to verify its relationship to transient neurological events (TNEs) and regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF).

METHODS

A total of 141 hemispheres in 107 consecutive patients with moyamoya disease who had undergone direct bypass surgery were analyzed. In all cases, FLAIR images were obtained during postoperative days (PODs) 1–3 and during the chronic period (3.2 ± 1.13 months after surgery). The CHB sign was defined as an intraparenchymal high-intensity signal within the cortex of the surgically treated hemisphere with no infarction or hemorrhage present. The territory of the middle cerebral artery was divided into anterior and posterior parts, with the extent of the CHB sign in each part scored as 0 for none; 1 for presence in less than half of the part; and 2 for presence in more than half of the part. The sum of these scores provided the CHB score (0–4). TNEs were defined as reversible neurological deficits detected both objectively and subjectively. The rCBF was measured with SPECT using N-isopropyl-p-[123I]iodoamphetamine before surgery and during PODs 1–3. The rCBF increase ratio was calculated by comparing the pre- and postoperative count activity.

RESULTS

Cortical hyperintensity belt signs were detected in 112 cases (79.4%) and all disappeared during the chronic period. Although all bypass grafts were anastomosed to the anterior part of the middle cerebral artery territory, CHB signs were much more pronounced in the posterior part (p < 0.0001). TNEs were observed in 86 cases (61.0%). Patients with TNEs showed significantly higher CHB scores than those without (2.31 ± 0.13 vs 1.24 ± 0.16, p < 0.0001). The CHB score, on the other hand, showed no relationship with the rCBF increase ratio (p = 0.775). In addition, the rCBF increase ratio did not differ between those patients with TNEs and those without (1.15 ± 0.033 vs 1.16 ± 0.037, p = 0.978).

CONCLUSIONS

The findings strongly suggest that the presence of the CHB sign during PODs 1–3 can be a predictor of TNEs after bypass surgery for moyamoya disease. On the other hand, presence of this sign appears to have no direct relationship with the postoperative local hyperperfusion phenomenon. Vasogenic edema can be hypothesized as the pathophysiology of the CHB sign, because the sign was transient and never accompanied by infarction in the present series.