Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 4 of 4 items for

  • Author or Editor: Robert Keating x
  • By Author: Gaillard, William D. x
Clear All Modify Search
Free access

Matthew F. Sacino, Cheng-Ying Ho, Jonathan Murnick, Robert F. Keating, William D. Gaillard and Chima O. Oluigbo

OBJECTIVE

Previous studies have demonstrated that an important factor in seizure freedom following surgery for lesional epilepsy in the peri-eloquent cortex is completeness of resection. However, aggressive resection of epileptic tissue localized to this region must be balanced with the competing objective of retaining postoperative neurological functioning. The objective of this study was to investigate the role of intraoperative MRI (iMRI) as a complement to existing epilepsy protocol techniques and to compare rates of seizure freedom and neurological deficit in pediatric patients undergoing resection of perieloquent lesions.

METHODS

The authors retrospectively reviewed the medical records of pediatric patients who underwent resection of focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) or heterotopia localized to eloquent cortex regions at the Children's National Health System between March 2005 and August 2015. Patients were grouped into two categories depending on whether they underwent conventional resection (n = 18) or iMRI-assisted resection (n = 11). Patient records were reviewed for factors including demographics, length of hospitalization, postoperative seizure freedom, postoperative neurological deficit, and need for reoperation. Postsurgical seizure outcome was assessed at the last postoperative follow-up evaluation using the Engel Epilepsy Surgery Outcome Scale.

RESULTS

At the time of the last postoperative follow-up examination, 9 (82%) of the 11 patients in the iMRI resection group were seizure free (Engel Class I), compared with 7 (39%) of the 18 patients in the control resection group (p = 0.05). Ten (91%) of the 11 patients in the iMRI cohort achieved gross-total resection (GTR), compared with 8 (44%) of 18 patients in the conventional resection cohort (p = 0.02). One patient in the iMRI-assisted resection group underwent successful reoperation at a later date for residual dysplasia, compared with 7 patients in the conventional resection cohort (with 2/7 achieving complete resection). Four (36%) of the patients in the iMRI cohort developed postoperative neurological deficits, compared with 15 patients (83%) in the conventional resection cohort (p = 0.02).

CONCLUSIONS

These results suggest that in comparison with a conventional surgical protocol and technique for resection of epileptic lesions in peri-eloquent cortex, the incorporation of iMRI led to elevated rates of GTR and postoperative seizure freedom. Furthermore, this study suggests that iMRI-assisted surgeries are associated with a reduction in neurological deficits due to intraoperative damage of eloquent cortex.

Free access

Matthew F. Sacino, Cheng-Ying Ho, Jonathan Murnick, Tammy Tsuchida, Suresh N. Magge, Robert F. Keating, William D. Gaillard and Chima O. Oluigbo

OBJECTIVE

Previous meta-analysis has demonstrated that the most important factor in seizure freedom following surgery for focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) is completeness of resection. However, intraoperative detection of epileptogenic dysplastic cortical tissue remains a challenge, potentially leading to a partial resection and the need for reoperation. The objective of this study was to determine the role of intraoperative MRI (iMRI) in the intraoperative detection and localization of FCD as well as its impact on surgical decision making, completeness of resection, and seizure control outcomes.

METHODS

The authors retrospectively reviewed the medical records of pediatric patients who underwent iMRI-assisted resection of FCD at the Children's National Health System between January 2014 and April 2015. Data reviewed included demographics, length of surgery, details of iMRI acquisition, postoperative seizure freedom, and complications. Postsurgical seizure outcome was assessed utilizing the Engel Epilepsy Surgery Outcome Scale.

RESULTS

Twelve consecutive pediatric patients (8 females and 4 males) underwent iMRI-guided resection of FCD lesions. The mean age at the time of surgery was 8.8 years ± 1.6 years (range 0.7 to 18.8 years), and the mean duration of follow up was 3.5 months ± 1.0 month. The mean age at seizure onset was 2.8 years ± 1.0 year (range birth to 9.0 years). Two patients had Type 1 FCD, 5 patients had Type 2A FCD, 2 patients had Type 2B FCD, and 3 patients had FCD of undetermined classification. iMRI findings impacted intraoperative surgical decision making in 5 (42%) of the 12 patients, who then underwent further exploration of the resection cavity. At the time of the last postoperative follow-up, 11 (92%) of the 12 patients were seizure free (Engel Class I). No patients underwent reoperation following iMRI-guided surgery.

CONCLUSIONS

iMRI-guided resection of FCD in pediatric patients precluded the need for repeat surgery. Furthermore, it resulted in the achievement of complete resection in all the patients, leading to a high rate of postoperative seizure freedom.

Full access

Matthew F. Sacino, Cheng-Ying Ho, Matthew T. Whitehead, Amy Kao, Dewi Depositario-Cabacar, John S. Myseros, Suresh N. Magge, Robert F. Keating, William D. Gaillard and Chima O. Oluigbo

OBJECTIVE

Focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) is a common cause of medically intractable epilepsy that often may be treated by surgery. Following resection, many patients continue to experience seizures, necessitating a decision for further surgery to achieve the desired seizure outcomes. Few studies exist on the efficacy of reoperation for intractable epilepsy due to FCD in pediatric cohorts, including the definition of prognostic factors correlated with clinical benefit from further resection.

METHODS

The authors retrospectively analyzed the medical records and MR images of 22 consecutive pediatric patients who underwent repeat FCD resection after unsuccessful first surgery at the Children's National Health System between March 2005 and April 2015.

RESULTS

Accounting for all reoperations, 13 (59%) of the 22 patients achieved complete seizure freedom and another 5 patients (23%) achieved significant improvement in seizure control. Univariate analysis demonstrated that concordance in electrocorticography (ECoG) and MRI localization (p = 0.005), and completeness of resection (p = 0.0001), were associated with seizure freedom after the first reoperation. Patients with discordant ECoG and MRI findings ultimately benefited from aggressive multilobe lobectomy or hemispherectomy. Repeat lesionectomies utilizing intraoperative MRI (iMRI; n = 9) achieved complete resection and seizure freedom in all cases.

CONCLUSIONS

Reoperation may be clinically beneficial in patients with intractable epilepsy due to FCD. Patients with concordant intraoperative ECoG and MRI localization may benefit from extended resection of residual dysplasia at the margins of the previous lesional cavity, and iMRI may offer benefits as a quality control mechanism to ensure that a complete resection has been accomplished. Patients with discordant findings may benefit from more aggressive resections at earlier stages to achieve better seizure control and ensure functional plasticity.

Full access

Chima O. Oluigbo, Jichuan Wang, Matthew T. Whitehead, Suresh Magge, John S. Myseros, Amanda Yaun, Dewi Depositario-Cabacar, William D. Gaillard and Robert Keating

OBJECT

Focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) is one of the most common causes of intractable epilepsy leading to surgery in children. The predictors of seizure freedom after surgical management for FCD are still unclear. The objective of this study was to perform a volumetric analysis of factors shown on the preresection and postresection brain MRI scans of patients who had undergone resective epilepsy surgery for cortical dysplasia and to determine the influence of these factors on seizure outcome.

METHODS

The authors reviewed the medical records and brain images of 43 consecutive patients with focal MRI-documented abnormalities and a pathological diagnosis of FCD who had undergone surgical treatment for refractory epilepsy. Preoperative lesion volume and postoperative resection volume were calculated by manual segmentation using OsiriX PRO software.

RESULTS

Forty-three patients underwent first-time surgery for resection of an FCD. The age range of these patients at the time of surgery ranged from 2 months to 21.8 years (mean age 7.3 years). The median duration of follow-up was 20 months. The mean age at onset was 31.6 months (range 1 day to 168 months). Complete resection of the area of an FCD, as adjudged from the postoperative brain MR images, was significantly associated with seizure control (p = 0.0005). The odds of having good seizure control among those who underwent complete resection were about 6 times higher than those among the patients who did not undergo complete resection. Seizure control was not significantly associated with lesion volume (p = 0.46) or perilesion resection volume (p = 0.86).

CONCLUSIONS

The completeness of FCD resection in children is a significant predictor of seizure freedom. Neither lesion volume nor the further resection of perilesional tissue is predictive of seizure freedom.