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  • Author or Editor: Raymond Sawaya x
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Fadi Hanbali, Gregory N. Fuller, Norman E. Leeds and Raymond Sawaya

Several types of mass lesions may occur in the third and lateral ventricles. Typically they arise from the lining of the ventricular cavity or from contiguous structures, by extension into the ventricle. The authors describe two patients, each of whom presented with a different rare lesion of the ventricular system. The first was a 53-year-old woman with a history of hypertension who sustained a blunt traumatic injury to the occipital region and subsequently developed a progressively worsening right-sided headache. Radiological examinations over the next 2 years revealed an enlarged right lateral ventricle and, ultimately, a choroid plexus cyst in its anterior and middle third, near the foramen of Monro, which is a rare location for these lesions. The cyst was removed en bloc, and follow-up examinations showed a significant improvement in her headache and a minimal differences in size between right and left ventricles. The authors also describe a 57-year-old man with hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and an old mycardial infarct, who presented to an outside institution with a progressively worsening headache, generalized malaise, and loss of olfactory sensation. Diagnostic imaging revealed a 1.5-cm oval lesion centered in the lamina terminalis region, an open craniotomy was performed, and evaluation of a biopsy sample demonstrated the mass to be a chordoid glioma of the third ventricle, a recently described glioma subtype. Two days after surgery, he suffered a left parietal stroke and an anterior mycardial infarction. After convalescing, he presented to The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center for radiotherapy and follow up; 7 months later he was readmitted complaining of headache, short-term memory loss, and worsening confusion and disorientation. Neuroimaging revealed progression of the tumor (now 2 cm in diameter), which was removed by gross-total resection. His headache resolved immediately, and 2 months later his only complaint was of episodes of confusion. Three weeks later he died of a massive myocardial infarction. These two patients represent the sixth case of an adult with a choroid plexus cyst in the anterior lateral ventricle and the 19th case of an adult with a chordoid glioma of the third ventricle, respectively.

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Sumeer Lal, Michel Lacroix, Philip Tofilon, Gregory N. Fuller, Raymond Sawaya and Frederick F. Lang

Object. To overcome the problems associated with using stereotactic techniques to establish intracranial xenografts in nude mice and to treat engrafted tumors with intratumoral therapies (such as gene or viral therapies), the authors developed an implantable guide-screw system. In this study, they describe the guide-screw system, its method of implantation, and their experience with establishing xenografts and delivering intratumoral therapy.

Methods. The system consists of a 2.6-mm guide screw with a central 0.5-mm diameter hole that accepts the 26-gauge needle of a Hamilton syringe. The screw is implanted into a small drill hole made 2.5 mm lateral and 1 mm anterior to the bregma. A stylet is used to cap the screw between treatments. Tumor cells or therapeutic agents are injected in a freehand fashion by using a Hamilton syringe and a 26-gauge needle fitted with a cuff to determine the depth of injection. To test this system, guide screws were successfully implanted in 44 (98%) of 45 nude mice. After 1 to 2 weeks of recovery, 38 mice were inoculated with U87MG cells and killed 5 days later. On histological studies in 37 (97%) of these animals, xenografts were evident within the caudate nucleus (mean diameter 2.5 mm). To determine whether injections into the center of an established xenograft could be reproducibly achieved with the guide-screw system, an adenovirus vector containing the β-galactosidase gene was injected 3 days after cell implantation in 15 of the mice. All of these animals demonstrated transduced cells within the tumor. To demonstrate that engrafted animals have a uniform survival time that is indicative of reproducible tumor growth, the survival of six mice was assessed after engraftment with U87MG cells. All six animals died within 28 to 35 days.

Conclusions. The guide-screw system allows a large number of animals to be rapidly and reproducibly engrafted and for intratumoral treatments to be accurately delivered into established xenografts.

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Wael Hassaneen, Dima Suki, Abhijit L. Salaskar, David M. Wildrick, Frederick F. Lang, Gregory N. Fuller and Raymond Sawaya

Object

The aim of this study was to review the outcome of patients undergoing surgery for treatment of lateral-ventricle metastases.

Methods

Imaging information and chart reviews of operative reports were used to conduct a retrospective analysis in 29 patients who underwent resection of lateral-ventricle metastases at the authors' institution between 1993 and 2007. Clinical and neurosurgical outcomes and recurrence rates were studied.

Results

The mean patient age was 56 years (range 20–69 years); 66% of patients were male. Single intraventricular metastases occurred in 69% of patients, and 55% of them had systemic metastases. The 30-day postoperative mortality rate was 7%. There was intracerebral tumor recurrence in 41% of patients, with 1 patient undergoing a second operation for this. The median postoperative survival duration for 28 patients (excluding 1 patient with preoperative leptomeningeal disease) was 11.7 months; the 3- and 5-year survival rates were 17 and 11%, respectively. Univariate analysis identified factors significantly influencing survival, including the preoperative Karnofsky Performance Scale (KPS) score (p = 0.02), the number of cerebral metastases (p = 0.02), the presence of primary renal cell carcinoma (RCC) (p = 0.02), and the resection method (en bloc vs piecemeal; p = 0.05). The presence of extracranial metastases did not significantly influence survival. Multivariate analysis showed that the preoperative KPS score (p = 0.002), the presence of primary RCC (p = 0.039), and the resection method (en bloc vs piecemeal; p = 0.008) correlated significantly with survival time.

Conclusions

Surgery is an important component in the management of intraventricular metastases. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first study focusing totally on resection of lateral-ventricle metastases. The authors found that patients with primary RCC, those with a favorable preoperative KPS score, and those who underwent en bloc resection had a better outcome than others.

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Marcos V. C. Maldaun, Dima Suki, Frederick F. Lang, Sujit Prabhu, Weiming Shi, Gregory N. Fuller, David M. Wildrick and Raymond Sawaya

Object. The goal of this study was to determine whether the presence of a large tumor cyst was associated with improved outcome in patients undergoing surgery for newly diagnosed glioblastomas multiforme (GBMs) by comparing these patients with a matched cohort of patients with noncystic GBMs in clinical features, tumor imaging characteristics, survival, and time to tumor recurrence after surgery.

Methods. A retrospective analysis was conducted in 22 patients by using imaging information and chart reviews of operative reports of GBMs with large cysts (≥ 50% of tumor volume) at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center between 1993 and 2002. Clinical and neurosurgical outcomes and recurrence rates were studied. A statistical comparison was made with a matching cohort of 22 patients with noncystic GBMs.

No significant differences in clinical variables were found between the cohort with cystic GBMs and the matched cohort with noncystic GBMs. To avoid bias in preoperative assessment of tumor volume, the tumor burden was compared in patients whose tumors had cysts (excluding the cystic mass) and in patients whose tumors did not contain cysts. There was no statistically significant difference between the two groups (p = 0.8). In patients with cystic GBMs the median survival time after surgery was 18.2 months (95% confidence interval [CI] 11.9–24.5 months) and at 2 years 43% of the patients were still alive. In comparison, in patients with noncystic GBMs, the median survival time was 14.3 months (95% CI 12.1–16.4 months) and only 16% of patients were alive at 2 years. The median time to tumor recurrence was 7.6 months (95% CI 0.01–18 months) in patients harboring cystic GBMs and 4.2 months (95% CI 1.8–6.6 months) in the matched cohort (log-rank test, p = 0.04). In the cystic GBM group, no recurrence was observed in 53% of patients at 6 months, 45% at 1 year, and 38% at 2 years after surgery, whereas the corresponding numbers for the noncystic group were 36, 14, and 9%, respectively.

Conclusions. The results indicate that patients harboring a GBM that contains a large cyst survive longer and have a longer time to recurrence than those who lack such a cyst. This is the first such observation in the literature.