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Michael Y. Wang, Praveen V. Mummaneni, Kai-Ming G. Fu, Neel Anand, David O. Okonkwo, Adam S. Kanter, Frank La Marca, Richard Fessler, Juan Uribe, Christopher I. Shaffrey, Virginie Lafage, Raqeeb M. Haque, Vedat Deviren and Gregory M. Mundis Jr.

S urgery for adult spinal deformity (ASD) remains a challenging proposition. Several factors contribute to create a high likelihood of intraoperative and postoperative complication rates. Medical comorbidities, patient deconditioning due to pain and immobility, associated osteoporosis, a rigid skeletal deformity, and abnormal spinal anatomy all increase the likelihood of a complication from ASD surgery. 6 , 9 Furthermore, the surgical enterprise needed to destabilize, realign, and fuse the spine over multiple segments is painful and debilitating

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Justin S. Smith, Christopher I. Shaffrey, Virginie Lafage, Frank Schwab, Justin K. Scheer, Themistocles Protopsaltis, Eric Klineberg, Munish Gupta, Richard Hostin, Kai-Ming G. Fu, Gregory M. Mundis Jr., Han Jo Kim, Vedat Deviren, Alex Soroceanu, Robert A. Hart, Douglas C. Burton, Shay Bess, Christopher P. Ames and the International Spine Study Group

A dults with spinal deformity characteristically present with pain and disability. 6 , 8 , 10 , 18 , 19 , 22 , 37 , 42–44 , 46 , 47 , 49 , 51 , 52 In the absence of significant or progressive neurological deficit, first-line treatments for symptomatic adult spinal deformity (ASD) are typically nonoperative and may include physical therapy, steroid injections, non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs, and, potentially, narcotics. 2 , 48 For patients who do not achieve a satisfactory response with nonoperative approaches, surgical treatment may become an

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Juan S. Uribe, Armen R. Deukmedjian, Praveen V. Mummaneni, Kai-Ming G. Fu, Gregory M. Mundis Jr., David O. Okonkwo, Adam S. Kanter, Robert Eastlack, Michael Y. Wang, Neel Anand, Richard G. Fessler, Frank La Marca, Paul Park, Virginie Lafage, Vedat Deviren, Shay Bess and Christopher I. Shaffrey

O ver the past several decades, surgical treatment options for adult spinal deformity (ASD) have expanded, including both minimally invasive and open techniques. 3 , 12 , 14 , 18 , 27 Determining the most suitable approach in patients should take into account the risks and benefits of each surgical technique. Unfortunately, studies comparing the different operative techniques are lacking. Moreover, outcomes and complications of ASD are largely reported in terms of patient characteristics following traditional open techniques with little published data

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Justin S. Smith, Ellen Shaffrey, Eric Klineberg, Christopher I. Shaffrey, Virginie Lafage, Frank J. Schwab, Themistocles Protopsaltis, Justin K. Scheer, Gregory M. Mundis Jr., Kai-Ming G. Fu, Munish C. Gupta, Richard Hostin, Vedat Deviren, Khaled Kebaish, Robert Hart, Douglas C. Burton, Breton Line, Shay Bess, Christopher P. Ames and The International Spine Study Group

S ubstantial improvements in surgical techniques, instrumentation, perioperative management, and reduction of risk related to comorbid conditions have broadened the indications for correction of adult spinal deformity (ASD) and have enabled correction of increasingly more complex deformities. Although data thus far seem to indicate that selected adults with spinal deformity do have significant potential for improvement with surgical treatment, overall complication rates remain high and represent areas for continued improvement 7 , 8 , 32 , 39–43 Despite

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Degeneration via XLIF Jody A. Rodgers , MD, FACS (Spine Midwest, Inc.); W.B. Rodgers , MD , and Edward J. Gerber 3 2011 30 3 A22 A22 2011 Introduction: The XLIF approach provides a minimally disruptive alternative to anterior column access that allows for large graft placement, disk height restoration, and indirect decompression, while avoiding posterior scar tissue from the previous procedure. Results of ASD treated with XLIF are presented. Methods: Of our single-site consecutive series of 932 XLIF patients, 276

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adjacent segment disease (ASD) in the cervical spine. Methods: 888 patients received ACDFs for symptomatic degenerative disease of the cervical spine over the past 22 years at our institution. Of these, 108 patients received repeat ACDF surgeries due to symptomatic ASD. 77 received revision surgeries anteriorly, and 31 received posterior surgeries. Pre, intra, peri, and post-operative data were collected via clinical notes and patient interviews. Patients were followed up for an average of 111.8±76.5 months after the first ACDF. Results: In general, patients

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between the two forms of treatment emerge. Neurosurg Focus Neurosurgical Focus FOC 1092-0684 American Association of Neurological Surgeons 2015.3.FOC-DSPNABSTRACTS 103. A Prospective, Multi-Center Assessment of the Best Versus Worst Clinical Outcomes for Adult Spinal Deformity (ASD) Surgery Justin S. Smith , MD PhD , Christopher I. Shaffrey , MD FACS , Virginie Lafage , PhD , Frank Schwab , MD, PhD , Themistocles Protopsaltis , MD , Eric Klineberg , MD , Munish

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remains stable comparing 3 and 12-month results. Neurosurg Focus Neurosurgical Focus FOC 1092-0684 American Association of Neurological Surgeons 2014.3.FOC-DSPNABSTRACTS Abstract Outcomes Award 103. Two Year Prospective, Multicenter Analysis of Consecutive Adult Spinal Deformity (ASD) Patients Demonstrates Higher Fusion Grade, Lower Implant Failures and Greater Improvement in SRS-22r Scores for Patients Treated with Recombinant Human Bone Morpho Kai-Ming G. Fu , MD PhD , Eric Klineberg , MD , Shay

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, MD, PhD 3 2017 42 3 Peripheral Nerve A10 A11 Copyright held by the American Association of Neurological Surgeons. You may not sell, republish, or systematically distribute any published materials without written permission from JNSPG. 2017 Introduction: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of cervical total disc replacement (TDR) for symptomatic adjacent segment degeneration (ASD) with previous anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) was done, compared to ACDF in the treatment of cervical ASD