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  • Author or Editor: Raymond Sawaya x
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Akash J. Patel, Dima Suki, Mustafa Aziz Hatiboglu, Vikas Y. Rao, Benjamin D. Fox and Raymond Sawaya

OBJECT

Brain metastases are the most common intracranial neoplasms and are on the increase. As radiation side effects are increasingly better understood, more patients are being treated with surgery alone with varying outcomes. The authors previously reported that en bloc resection of a single brain metastasis was associated with decreased incidences of leptomeningeal disease and local recurrence compared with piecemeal resection. However, en bloc resection is often feared to cause an increased incidence of postoperative complications. This study aimed to answer this question.

METHODS

The authors reviewed data from patients with a previously untreated single brain metastasis, who were treated with resection at The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center (1993–2012). Data related to the patient, tumor, and methods of resection were obtained. Discharge Karnofsky Performance Scale (KPS) scores and 30-day postoperative complications were noted. Complications were considered major when they persisted for longer than 30 days, resulted in hospitalization or prolongation of hospital stay, required aggressive treatment, and/or were life threatening.

RESULTS

During the study period, 1033 eligible patients were identified. The median age was 58 years, 83% had a KPS score greater than 70, and 81% were symptomatic at surgery. Sixty-two percent of the patients underwent en bloc resection of their tumor, and 38% underwent piecemeal resection. There were significant differences between the 2 groups in terms of preoperative tumor volume, tumor functional grade, and symptoms at presentation, among others. The overall complication rates were 13% for patients undergoing en bloc resection and 19% for patients undergoing piecemeal resection (p = 0.007). The incidences of major complications and neurological complications were also significantly different. There was a trend in the same direction for major neurological complications, although it was not significant. Among patients undergoing piecemeal resection of tumors in eloquent cortex, 24% had complications (13% had major, 18% had neurological, 9% had major neurological, and 13% had select neurological complications; 4% died within 1 month of surgery). Among those undergoing en bloc resection of such tumors, 11% had complications (6% had major, 8% had neurological, 4% had major neurological, and 4% had select neurological; 2% died within 1 month of surgery). The differences in overall, major, neurological, and select neurological complications were statistically significant, but 1-month mortality and major neurological complications were not. In addition, within subcategories of tumor volume, the incidence of various complications was generally higher for patients undergoing piecemeal resection than for those undergoing en bloc resection.

CONCLUSIONS

The authors' results indicate that postoperative complication rates are not increased by en bloc resection, including for lesions in eloquent brain regions or for large tumors. This gives credence to the idea that en bloc resection of brain metastases, when feasible, is at least as safe as piecemeal resection.

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Benjamin D. Fox, Hassan H. Amhaz, Akash J. Patel, Daniel H. Fulkerson, Dima Suki, Andrew Jea and Raymond E. Sawaya

Object

Medical student exposure to neurosurgery is limited. To improve the educational interactions between neurosurgeons and medical students as well as neurosurgical medical student rotations or clerkships (NSCs) we must first understand the current status.

Methods

Two questionnaires were sent, one to every neurosurgery course coordinator or director at each US neurosurgery residency program (99 questionnaires) and one to the associated parent medical school dean's office (91 questionnaires), to assess the current status of NSCs and the involvement of neurosurgeons at their respective institutions.

Results

We received responses from 86 (87%) of 99 neurosurgery course coordinators or directors and 64 (70%) of 91 medical school deans' offices. Most NSCs do not have didactic lectures (53 [62%] of 86 NSCs), provide their medical students with a syllabus or educational handouts (53 [62%] of 86), or have a recommended/required textbook (77 [90%] of 86). The most common method of evaluating students in NSCs is a subjective performance evaluation. Of 64 medical school deans, 38 (59%) felt that neurosurgery should not be a required rotation. Neurosurgical rotations or clerkships are primarily offered to students in their 4th year of medical school, which may be too late for appropriate timing of residency applications. Only 21 (33%) of 64 NSCs offer neurosurgery rotations to 3rd-year students.

Conclusions

There is significant room for improvement in the neurosurgeon-to–medical student interactions in both the NSCs and during the didactic years of medical school.

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Brian J. Williams, Dima Suki, Benjamin D. Fox, Christopher E. Pelloski, Marcos V. C. Maldaun, Raymond E. Sawaya, Frederick F. Lang and Ganesh Rao

Object

Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is commonly used to treat brain metastases. Complications associated with this treatment are underreported. The authors reviewed a large series of patients who underwent SRS for brain metastases to identify complications and factors predicting their occurrence.

Methods

Prospectively collected clinical data from 273 patients undergoing SRS for 1 or 2 brain metastases at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center between June 1993 and December 2004 were reviewed. Patients who had received prior treatment for their tumor, including whole-brain radiation, SRS, or surgery, were excluded from the study. Data on adverse neurological and nonneurological outcomes following treatment were collected.

Results

Three hundred sixteen lesions were treated. Complications were associated with 127 (40%) of 316 treated lesions. New neurological complications were associated with 101 (32%) of 316 lesions. The onset of seizure was the most common complication, occurring in 41 (13%) of 316 SRS cases. On multivariate analysis, progressing primary cancer (hazard ratio [HR] = 2.4, 95% CI 1.6–3.6, p < 0.001), tumor location in eloquent cortex (HR = 2.3, 95% CI 1.6–3.4, p < 0.001), and lower (< 15 Gy) SRS dose (HR = 2.1, 95% CI 1.1–4.2, p = 0.04) were significantly associated with new complications. On multivariate analysis, a tumor location in the eloquent cortex (HR = 2.5, 95% CI 1.6–3.8, p < 0.001) and progressing primary cancer (HR = 1.6, 95% CI 1.1–2.5, p = 0.03) were significantly associated with new neurological complications.

Conclusions

The authors showed that new neurological and nonneurological complications were associated with 40% of SRS treatments for brain metastases. Patients with lesions in functional brain regions have a significantly increased risk of treatment-related complications.

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Oral Presentations

2010 AANS Annual Meeting Philadelphia, Pennsylvania May 1–5, 2010