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  • Author or Editor: Masato Matsumoto x
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Masato Matsumoto, Masanori Sato, Masayuki Nakano, Yuji Endo, Youichi Watanabe, Tatsuya Sasaki, Kyouichi Suzuki and Namio Kodama

Object. The aim of this study was to assess whether aneurysm surgery can be performed in patients with ruptured cerebral aneurysms by using three-dimensional computerized tomography (3D-CT) angiography alone, without conventional catheter angiography.

Methods. In a previous study, 60 patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) from ruptured aneurysms were prospectively evaluated using both 3D-CT and conventional angiography, which resulted in a 100% accuracy for 3D-CT angiography in the diagnosis of ruptured aneurysms, and a 96% accuracy in the identification of associated unruptured aneurysms. The results led the authors to consider replacing conventional angiography with 3D-CT angiography for use in diagnosing ruptured aneurysms, and to perform surgery aided by 3D-CT angiography alone without conventional angiography. Based on the results, 100 consecutive patients with SAH who had undergone surgery in the acute stage based on 3D-CT angiography findings have been studied since December 1996. One hundred ruptured aneurysms, including 41 associated unruptured lesions, were detected using 3D-CT angiography. In seven of 100 ruptured aneurysms, which included four dissecting vertebral artery aneurysms, two basilar artery (BA) tip aneurysms, and one BA—superior cerebellar artery aneurysm, 3D-CT angiography was followed by conventional angiography to acquire diagnostic confirmation or information about the vein of Labbé, which was needed to guide the surgical approach for BA tip aneurysms. All of the ruptured aneurysms were confirmed at surgery and treated successfully. Ninety-three patients who underwent operation with the aid of 3D-CT angiography only had no complications related to the lack of information gathered by conventional angiography. The 3D-CT angiography studies provided the authors with the aneurysm location as well as surgically important information on the configuration of its sac and neck, the presence of calcification in the aneurysm wall, and its relationship to the adjacent vessels and bone structures.

Conclusions The authors believe that 3D-CT angiography can replace conventional angiography in the diagnosis of ruptured aneurysms and that surgery can be performed in almost all acutely ruptured aneurysms by using only 3D-CT angiography without conventional angiography.

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Tatsuya Sasaki, Namio Kodama, Masato Matsumoto, Kyouichi Suzuki, Yutaka Konno, Jun Sakuma, Yuji Endo and Masahiro Oinuma

Object

The object of this study was to investigate patients with cerebral infarction in the area of the perforating arteries after aneurysm surgery.

Methods

The authors studied the incidence of cerebral infarction in 1043 patients using computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging and the affected perforating arteries, clinical symptoms, prognosis, and operative maneuvers resulting in blood flow disturbance.

Results

Among 46 patients (4.4%) with infarction, the affected perforating arteries were the anterior choroidal artery (AChA) in nine patients, lenticulostriate artery (LSA) in nine patients, hypothalamic artery in two patients, posterior thalamoperforating artery in five patients, perforating artery of the vertebral artery (VA) in three patients, anterior thalamoperforating artery in nine patients, and recurrent artery of Heubner in nine patients. Sequelae persisted in 21 (45.7%) of the 46 patients; 13 (28.3%) had transient symptoms and 12 (26.1%) were asymptomatic. Sequelae developed in all patients with infarctions in perforating arteries in the area of the AChA, hypothalamic artery, or perforating artery of the VA; in four of five patients with posterior thalamoperforating artery involvement; and in two of nine with LSA involvement. The symptoms of anterior thalamoperforating artery infarction or recurrent artery of Heubner infarction were mild and/or transient. The operative maneuvers leading to blood flow disturbance in perforating arteries were aneurysmal neck clipping in 21 patients, temporary occlusion of the parent artery in nine patients, direct injury in seven patients, retraction in five patients, and trapping of the parent artery in four patients.

Conclusions

The patency of the perforating artery cannot be determined by intraoperative microscopic inspection. Intraoperative motor evoked potential monitoring contributed to the detection of blood flow disturbance in the territory of the AChA and LSA.

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Tatsuya Sasaki, Takeshi Itakura, Kyouichi Suzuki, Hiromichi Kasuya, Ryoji Munakata, Hiroyuki Muramatsu, Tsuyoshi Ichikawa, Taku Sato, Yuji Endo, Jun Sakuma and Masato Matsumoto

Object

To obtain a clinically useful method of intraoperative monitoring of visual evoked potentials (VEPs), the authors developed a new light-stimulating device and introduced electroretinography (ERG) to ascertain retinal light stimulation after induction of venous anesthesia.

Methods

The new stimulating device consists of 16 red light–emitting diodes embedded in a soft silicone disc to avoid deviation of the light axis after frontal scalp-flap reflection. After induction of venous anesthesia with propofol, the authors performed ERG and VEP recording in 100 patients (200 eyes) who were at intraoperative risk for visual impairment.

Results

Stable ERG and VEP recordings were obtained in 187 eyes. In 12 eyes, stable ERG data were recorded but VEPs could not be obtained, probably because all 12 eyes manifested severe preoperative visual dysfunction. The disappearance of ERG data and VEPs in the 13th eye after frontal scalp-flap reflection suggested technical failure attributable to deviation of the light axis. The criterion for amplitude changes was defined as a 50% increase or decrease in amplitude compared with the control level. In 1 of 187 eyes the authors observed an increase in intraoperative amplitude and postoperative visual function improvement. Of 169 eyes without amplitude changes, 17 manifested improved visual function postoperatively, 150 showed no change, and 2 worsened (1 patient with a temporal tumor developed a slight visual field defect in both eyes). Of 3 eyes with intraoperative VEP deterioration and subsequent recovery upon changing the operative maneuver, 1 improved and 2 exhibited no change. The VEP amplitude decreased without subsequent recovery to 50% of the control level in 14 eyes, and all of these developed various degrees of postoperative deterioration of visual function.

Conclusions

With the strategy introduced here it is possible to record intraoperative VEPs in almost all patients except in those with severe visual dysfunction. In some patients, postoperative visual deterioration can be avoided or minimized by intraoperative VEP recording. All patients without an intraoperative decrease in the VEP amplitude were without severe postoperative deterioration in visual function, suggesting that intraoperative VEP monitoring may contribute to prevent postoperative visual dysfunction.