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Sae-Yeon Won, Daniel Dubinski, Markus Bruder, Adriano Cattani, Volker Seifert and Juergen Konczalla

OBJECTIVE

Isolated acute subdural hematoma (aSDH) is increasing in older populations and so is the use of oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT). The dramatic increase of OAT—with direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) as well as with conventional anticoagulants—is leading to changes in the care of patients who present with aSDH while receiving OAT. The purpose of this study was to determine the management and outcome of patients being treated with OAT at the time of aSDH presentation.

METHODS

In this single-center, retrospective study, the authors analyzed 116 consecutive cases involving patients with aSDH treated from January 2007 to June 2016. The following parameters were assessed: patient characteristics, admission status, anticoagulation status, perioperative management, comorbidities, clinical course, and outcome as determined at discharge and through 6 months of follow-up. Oral anticoagulants were classified as thrombocyte inhibitors, vitamin K antagonists, and DOACs. Patients were stratified based on which type of medication they were taking, and subgroup analyses were performed. Predictors of unfavorable outcome at discharge and follow-up were identified.

RESULTS

Of 116 patients, 74 (64%) had been following an OAT regimen at presentation with aSDH. The patients who were taking oral anticoagulants (OAT group) were significantly older (OR 12.5), more often comatose 24 hours postoperatively (OR 2.4), and more often had ≥ 4 comorbidities (OR 3.2) than patients who were not taking oral anticoagulants (no-OAT group). Accordingly, the rate of unfavorable outcome was significantly higher in patients in the OAT group, both at discharge (OR 2.3) and at follow-up (OR 2.2). Of the patients in the OAT group, 37.8% were taking a thrombocyte inhibitor, 54.1% a vitamin K antagonist, and 8.1% DOACs. In all cases, OAT was stopped on discovery of aSDH. For reversal of anticoagulation, patients who were taking a thrombocyte inhibitor received desmopressin 0.4 μg/kg, 1–2 g tranexamic acid, and preoperative transfusion with 2 units of platelets. Patients following other oral anticoagulant regimens received 50 IU/kg of prothrombin complex concentrates and 10 mg of vitamin K. There was no significant difference in the rebleeding rate between the OAT and no-OAT groups. The in-hospital mortality rate was significantly higher for patients who were taking a thrombocyte inhibitor (OR 3.3), whereas patients who were taking a vitamin K antagonist had a significantly higher 6-month mortality rate (OR 2.7). Patients taking DOACs showed a tendency toward unfavorable outcome, with higher mortality rates than patients on conventional OAT or patients in the vitamin K antagonist subgroup. Independent predictors for unfavorable outcome at discharge were comatose status 24 hours after surgery (OR 93.2), rebleeding (OR 9.8), respiratory disease (OR 4.1), and infection (OR 11.1) (Nagelkerke R2 = 0.684). Independent predictors for unfavorable outcome at follow-up were comatose status 24 hours after surgery (OR 12.7), rebleeding (OR 3.1), age ≥ 70 years (OR 3.1), and 6 or more comorbidities (OR 3.1, Nagelkerke R2 = 0.466). OAT itself was not an independent predictor for worse outcome.

CONCLUSIONS

An OAT regimen at the time of presentation with aSDH is associated with increased mortality rates and unfavorable outcome at discharge and follow-up. Thrombocyte inhibitor treatment was associated with increased short-term mortality, whereas vitamin K antagonist treatment was associated with increased long-term mortality. In particular, patients on DOACs were seriously affected, showing more unfavorable outcomes at discharge as well as at follow-up. The suggested medical treatment for aSDH in both OAT and no-OAT patients seems to be effective and reasonable, with comparable rebleeding and favorable outcome rates in the 2 groups. In addition, prior OAT is not a predictor for aSDH outcome.

Free access

Sae-Yeon Won, Daniel Dubinski, Nina Brawanski, Adam Strzelczyk, Volker Seifert, Thomas M. Freiman and Juergen Konczalla

OBJECTIVE

Acute subdural hematoma (aSDH) is a common disease increasing in prevalence given the demographic growth of the aging population. Yet, the benefit of surgical treatment for aSDH and the subsequent functional outcome in elderly patients (age ≥ 80 years) remain unclear. Therefore, the aims of this study were to evaluate the incidence of aSDH in patients 80 years or older, determine overall functional outcome, identify predictors of an unfavorable or favorable outcome, and establish specific risk factors for seizures.

METHODS

The authors retrospectively analyzed patients 80 years and older who presented with isolated aSDH in the past 10 years at their institution. The following parameters were assessed: baseline characteristics, clinical status on admission and 24 hours after surgery, and clinical course. Functional outcome was assessed at discharge and the 3-month follow-up (FU).

RESULTS

In the period from January 2007 to December 2016, 165 patients with aSDH were admitted to the authors’ institution. Sixty-eight patients (41.2%) were 80 years old or older, and the mean age overall was 85 years (range 80–96 years). The incidence of aSDH in the elderly had significantly increased over past decade, with more than 50% of patients admitted to our institution for aSDH now being 80 years or older. The overall mortality rate was 28% at discharge and 48% at the FU. Independent predictors of an unfavorable outcome at discharge were a GCS score ≤ 8 at 24 hours after operation (p < 0.001) and pneumonia (p < 0.02). At the FU, a GCS score ≤ 8 at 24 hours after operation (p < 0.001) and cumulative comorbidities (≥ 5; p < 0.05) were significant independent predictors. All patients with more than 6 comorbidities had died by the FU. Surgical treatment in comatose compared to noncomatose patients had statistically significant, higher mortality rates at discharge and the FU. Still, 23% of the comatose patients and more than 50% of the noncomatose patients had a favorable outcome at the FU (p = 0.06).

CONCLUSIONS

The number of octo- and nonagenarians with aSDH significantly increased over the last decade. These patients can achieve a favorable outcome, especially those with a noncomatose status and fewer than 5 comorbidities. Surgical and nonsurgical treatment of octo- and nonagenarians during and after discharge should be optimized to increase clinical improvement.

Restricted access

Sae-Yeon Won, Florian Gessler, Daniel Dubinski, Michael Eibach, Bedjan Behmanesh, Eva Herrmann, Volker Seifert, Juergen Konczalla, Stephanie Tritt and Christian Senft

OBJECTIVE

Prophylactic placement of an external ventricular drain (EVD) is often performed prior to resection of a posterior fossa tumor (PFT); however, there is no general consensus regarding the indications. The purpose of this study was to establish a novel grading system for the prediction of required CSF drainage due to symptomatic elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) after resection of a PFT to identify patients who require an EVD.

METHODS

The authors performed a retrospective analysis of data from a prospective database. All patients who had undergone resection of a PFT between 2012 and 2017 at the University Hospital, Goethe University Frankfurt, were identified and data from their cases were analyzed. PFTs were categorized as intraparenchymal (iPFT) or extraparenchymal (ePFT). Prior to resection, patients underwent EVD placement, prophylactic burr hole placement, or neither. The authors assessed the amount of CSF drainage (if applicable), rate of EVD placement at a later time point, and complication rate and screened for factors associated with CSF drainage. By applying those factors, they established a grading system to predict the necessity of CSF drainage for elevated ICP.

RESULTS

A total of 197 patients met the inclusion criteria. Of these 197, 70.6% received an EVD, 15.7% underwent prophylactic burr hole placement, and 29.4% required temporary CSF drainage. In the prophylactic burr hole group, 1 of 32 patients (3.1%) required EVD placement at a later time. Independent predictors for postoperative need for CSF drainage due to symptomatic intracranial hypertension in patients with iPFTs were preoperative hydrocephalus (OR 2.9) and periventricular CSF capping (OR 2.9), whereas semi-sitting surgical position (OR 0.2) and total resection (OR 0.3) were protective factors. For patients with ePFTs, petroclival/midline tumor location (OR 12.2/OR 5.7), perilesional edema (OR 10.0), and preoperative hydrocephalus (OR 4.0) were independent predictors of need for CSF drainage. According to our grading system, CSF drainage after resection of iPFT or ePFT, respectively, was required in 16.7% and 5.1% of patients with a score of 0, in 21.1% and 12.5% of patients with a score of 1, in 47.1% and 26.3% of patients with a score of 2, and in 100% and 76.5% of patients with a score ≥ 3 (p < 0.0001). The rate of relevant EVD complications was 4.3%, and 10.1% of patients were shunt-dependent at 3-month follow-up.

CONCLUSIONS

This novel grading system for the prediction of need for CSF drainage following resection of PFT might be of help in deciding in favor of or against prophylactic EVD placement.

Free access

Bedjan Behmanesh, Florian Gessler, Katrin Schnoes, Daniel Dubinski, Sae-Yeon Won, Jürgen Konczalla, Volker Seifert, Lutz Weise and Matthias Setzer

OBJECTIVE

The incidence of patients with pyogenic spinal infection is increasing. In addition to treatment of the spinal infection, early diagnosis of and therapy for coexisting infections, especially infective endocarditis (IE), is an important issue. The aim of this study was to evaluate the proportion of coexisting IE and the value of routine transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) in the management of these patients.

METHODS

The medical history, laboratory data, radiographic findings, treatment modalities, and results of TEE of patients admitted between 2007 and 2017 were analyzed.

RESULTS

During the abovementioned period, 110 of 255 total patients underwent TEE for detection of IE. The detection rate of IE between those patients undergoing and not undergoing TEE was 33% and 3%, respectively (p < 0.0001). Thirty-six percent of patients with IE needed cardiac surgical intervention because of severe valve destruction. Chronic renal failure, heart failure, septic condition at admission, and preexisting heart condition were significantly associated with coexisting IE. The mortality rate in patients with IE was significantly higher than in patients without IE (22% vs 3%, p = 0.002).

CONCLUSIONS

TEE should be performed routinely in all patients with spondylodiscitis.