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  • Author or Editor: Rune Aaslid x
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Gill E. Sviri, Rune Aaslid, Colleen M. Douville, Anne Moore and David W. Newell

Object

The aim of the present study was to evaluate the time course for cerebral autoregulation (AR) recovery following severe traumatic brain injury (TBI)

Methods

Thirty-six patients (27 males and 9 females, mean ± SEM age 33 ± 15.1 years) with severe TBI underwent serial dynamic AR studies with leg cuff deflation as a stimulus, until recovery of the AR responses was measured.

Results

The AR was impaired (AR index < 2.8) in 30 (83%) of 36 patients on Days 3–5 after injury, and in 19 individuals (53%) impairments were found on Days 9–11 after the injury. Nine (25%) of 36 patients exhibited a poor AR response (AR index < 1) on postinjury Days 12–14, which eventually recovered on Days 15–23. Fifty-eight percent of the patients with a Glasgow Coma Scale score of 3–5, 50% of those with diffuse brain injury, 54% of those with elevated intracranial pressure, and 40% of those with poor outcome had no AR recovery in the first 11 days after injury.

Conclusions

Autoregulation recovery after severe TBI can be delayed, and failure to recover during the 2nd week after injury occurs mainly in patients with a lower Glasgow Coma Scale score, diffuse brain injury, elevated ICP, or unfavorable outcome. The finding suggests that perfusion pressure management should be considered in some of the patients for a period of at least 2 weeks.

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Elisabeth C. Jünger, David W. Newell, Gerald A. Grant, Anthony M. Avellino, Saadi Ghatan, Colleen M. Douville, Arthur M. Lam, Rune Aaslid and H. Richard Winn

The purpose of this study was to determine whether patients with minor head injury experience impairments in cerebral autoregulation. Twenty-nine patients with minor head injuries defined by Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores of 13 to 15 underwent testing of dynamic cerebral autoregulation within 48 hours of their injury using continuous transcranial Doppler velocity recordings and blood pressure recordings. Twenty-nine age-matched normal volunteers underwent autoregulation testing in the same manner to establish comparison values. The function of the autoregulatory response was assessed by the cerebral blood flow velocity response to induced rapid brief changes in arterial blood pressure and measured as the autoregulation index (ARI).

Eight (28%) of the 29 patients with minor head injury demonstrated poorly functioning or absent cerebral autoregulation versus none of the controls, and this difference was highly significant (p = 0.008). A significant correlation between lower blood pressure and worse autoregulation was found by regression analysis in head-injured patients (r = 0.6, p < 0.001); however, lower blood pressure did not account for the autoregulatory impairment in all patients. Within this group of head-injured patients there was no correlation between ARI and initial GCS or 1-month Glasgow Outcome Scale scores. This study indicates that a significant number of patients with minor head injury may have impaired cerebral autoregulation and may be at increased risk for secondary ischemic neuronal damage.

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Elisabeth C. Jünger, David W. Newell, Gerald A. Grant, Anthony M. Avellino, Saadi Ghatan, Colleen M. Douville, Arthur M. Lam, Rune Aaslid and H. Richard Winn

✓ The purpose of this study was to determine whether patients with minor head injury experience impairments in cerebral autoregulation. Twenty-nine patients with minor head injuries defined by Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores of 13 to 15 underwent testing of dynamic cerebral autoregulation within 48 hours of their injury using continuous transcranial Doppler velocity recordings and blood pressure recordings. Twenty-nine age-matched normal volunteers underwent autoregulation testing in the same manner to establish comparison values. The function of the autoregulatory response was assessed by the cerebral blood flow velocity response to induced rapid brief changes in arterial blood pressure and measured as the autoregulation index (ARI).

Eight (28%) of the 29 patients with minor head injury demonstrated poorly functioning or absent cerebral autoregulation versus none of the controls, and this difference was highly significant (p = 0.008). A significant correlation between lower blood pressure and worse autoregulation was found by regression analysis in head-injured patients (r = 0.6, p < 0.001); however, lower blood pressure did not account for the autoregulatory impairment in all patients. Within this group of head-injured patients there was no correlation between ARI and initial GCS or 1-month Glasgow Outcome Scale scores. This study indicates that a significant number of patients with minor head injury may have impaired cerebral autoregulation and may be at increased risk for secondary ischemic neuronal damage.