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  • Author or Editor: Dima Abi-Said x
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Franco DeMonte, Peyman Tabrizi, Scott A. Culpepper, Dima Abi-Said, Charles N. S. Soparkar and James R. Patrinely

Object

Partial resection of the orbital bones is not uncommon during the excision of anterior and anterolateral skull base tumors. Controversy exists regarding the need for and extent of the reconstruction necessary following this resection. The authors studied this factor in a series of patients.

Methods

The authors conducted a retrospective review of 56 patients in whom resection of 57 anterior or anterolateral skull base tumors and partial excision of the orbital bone were performed. Adverse ophthalmological outcomes were noted in 16 patients, in nine of whom adverse outcomes were believed to be directly related to resection of the orbital walls. Some degree of orbital reconstruction was performed during 23 of the 57 procedures. An adverse orbit-related outcome was strongly associated with resection of the orbital floor and with resection of two thirds or more of two or more orbital walls but not with the presence of absence or orbital reconstruction. The latter finding, however, is likely a function of selection bias.

Conclusions

In most patients after partial excision of the orbital bones, elaborate reconstruction is not necessary. Isolated medial and lateral orbital wall defects or combined superior and lateral orbital wall defects, especially in cases in which the periorbita is intact, probably do not require primary reconstruction. In cases of orbital floor defects, whether isolated or part of a multiple wall resection, primary reconstruction is recommended.

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Michel Lacroix, Dima Abi-Said, Daryl R. Fourney, Ziya L. Gokaslan, Weiming Shi, Franco DeMonte, Frederick F. Lang, Ian E. McCutcheon, Samuel J. Hassenbusch, Eric Holland, Kenneth Hess, Christopher Michael, Daniel Miller and Raymond Sawaya

Object. The extent of tumor resection that should be undertaken in patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) remains controversial. The purpose of this study was to identify significant independent predictors of survival in these patients and to determine whether the extent of resection was associated with increased survival time.

Methods. The authors retrospectively analyzed 416 consecutive patients with histologically proven GBM who underwent tumor resection at the authors' institution between June 1993 and June 1999. Volumetric data and other tumor characteristics identified on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging were collected prospectively.

Conclusions. Five independent predictors of survival were identified: age, Karnofsky Performance Scale (KPS) score, extent of resection, and the degree of necrosis and enhancement on preoperative MR imaging studies. A significant survival advantage was associated with resection of 98% or more of the tumor volume (median survival 13 months, 95% confidence interval [CI] 11.4–14.6 months), compared with 8.8 months (95% CI 7.4–10.2 months; p < 0.0001) for resections of less than 98%. Using an outcome scale ranging from 0 to 5 based on age, KPS score, and tumor necrosis on MR imaging, we observed significantly longer survival in patients with lower scores (1–3) who underwent aggressive resections, and a trend toward slightly longer survival was found in patients with higher scores (4–5). Gross-total tumor resection is associated with longer survival in patients with GBM, especially when other predictive variables are favorable.