Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 35 items for :

  • "deformity" x
  • By Author: Chou, Dean x
Clear All
Free access

Khoi D. Than, Paul Park, Kai-Ming Fu, Stacie Nguyen, Michael Y. Wang, Dean Chou, Pierce D. Nunley, Neel Anand, Richard G. Fessler, Christopher I. Shaffrey, Shay Bess, Behrooz A. Akbarnia, Vedat Deviren, Juan S. Uribe, Frank La Marca, Adam S. Kanter, David O. Okonkwo, Gregory M. Mundis Jr., Praveen V. Mummaneni and the International Spine Study Group

M invasive surgery (MIS) techniques are increasingly used in spine surgery, including in the treatment of adult spinal deformity (ASD). Such techniques include minimally invasive transpsoas retroperitoneal approaches for lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) and minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MI-TLIF). Previous work has suggested that minimally invasive spinal deformity correction is associated with fewer intraoperative complications than open or hybrid techniques 9 with comparable clinical outcomes. 2 However, with the

Restricted access

Paul Park, Kai-Ming Fu, Praveen V. Mummaneni, Juan S. Uribe, Michael Y. Wang, Stacie Tran, Adam S. Kanter, Pierce D. Nunley, David O. Okonkwo, Christopher I. Shaffrey, Gregory M. Mundis Jr., Dean Chou, Robert Eastlack, Neel Anand, Khoi D. Than, Joseph M. Zavatsky, Richard G. Fessler and the International Spine Study Group

A dult spinal deformity (ASD) can cause significant pain and disability. When the deformity is refractory to medical management, spinal deformity surgery can effectively improve pain and function. 14 Presently, there are many options for the surgical treatment of ASD, including minimally invasive surgery (MIS). 2 , 4 , 9 , 10 , 16 , 17 The potential advantages of MIS primarily reflect a significantly diminished exposure-related morbidity resulting in decreased bleeding, length of stay, and pain, and possibly faster recovery. Initial applications of MIS for ASD

Restricted access

Dominic Amara, Praveen V. Mummaneni, Christopher P. Ames, Bobby Tay, Vedat Deviren, Shane Burch, Sigurd H. Berven and Dean Chou

Research. All adult scoliosis patients treated at our medical center in the period from June 2006 to June 2016 were retrospectively screened for an FC > 10° and radiculopathy ipsilateral to the concavity of the FC. Patients with exclusively sagittal plane deformities, with only mechanical or axial back pain without radicular symptoms or without concomitant radicular leg pain from the FC, or with an FC < 10° were all excluded from this study. Patients without pre- and postoperative scoliosis radiography studies at our institution, with < 1 year of follow-up, or with

Full access

Darryl Lau and Dean Chou

efficacy of MIS techniques concentrate on simple decompression and lumbar fusions of degenerative etiology. Less frequently, MIS and mini-open approaches have been used to treat spinal tumors, osteomyelitis, sagittal deformities, and scoliosis. 13 , 24–27 The surgical management of such diseases can be technically challenging, even with traditional open approaches because complex spinal reconstruction is usually required. There are technical limitations and challenges when MIS approaches are used for spine surgery that require complex reconstruction, cage placement, and

Full access

Darryl Lau and Dean Chou

to minimize soft-tissue damage, yet still perform the same operation as in the open case. Mini-open approaches have been used to perform corpectomies, vertebral column resections, and correction for spinal deformity in the thoracolumbar spine. 4 , 9 , 12 , 13 , 34 , 51 However, there remains a paucity of studies that have evaluated the outcomes of the mini-open posterior corpectomy and the traditional open posterior corpectomy of the thoracic spine. In this study, we compare outcomes of patients who underwent mini-open versus those who underwent open

Restricted access

Dean Chou and Vincent Y. Wang

patients . Spine J 8 : 329 – 339 , 2008 13 Smith JT , Gollogly S , Dunn HK : Simultaneous anterior-posterior approach through a costotransversectomy for the treatment of congenital kyphosis and acquired kyphoscoliotic deformities . J Bone Joint Surg Am 87 : 2281 – 2289 , 2005 14 Snell BE , Nasr FF , Wolfla CE : Single-stage thoracolumbar vertebrectomy with circumferential reconstruction and arthrodesis: surgical technique and results in 15 patients . Neurosurgery 58 : 263 – 269 , 2006 15 Steinmetz MP , Mekhail A , Benzel EC

Restricted access

Dean Chou and Daniel C. Lu

difficult and time consuming. Second, these adjacent levels are essentially “normal” levels protected by the rib cage with generally limited motion. They are neither the apex of a deformity nor an unstable segment that has had a laminectomy (or even paraspinous muscle dissection). Third, for metastatic disease patients, we believed that arthrodesis at these adjacent levels was not as critical as the corpectomy defect itself because of the limited life expectancy. Similar to the fact that many patients with metastatic disease have been treated with methylmethacrylate

Free access

Junseok Bae, Alexander A. Theologis, Russell Strom, Bobby Tay, Shane Burch, Sigurd Berven, Praveen V. Mummaneni, Dean Chou, Christopher P. Ames and Vedat Deviren

T reatment options for adult spinal deformity (ASD) are varied according to the patient’s baseline condition. Patients with minimal pain and mild thoracolumbar coronal deformity might benefit from conservative treatment. 18 The goal of surgical treatment for patients with ASD is to achieve sagittal and coronal balance, relieve axial and radiating pain, and achieve fusion. The surgical treatment of ASD is an effective endeavor that can be accomplished using a variety of surgical strategies. Interbody fusion has been advocated as an important surgical option in

Restricted access

Dean Chou, Daniel C. Lu, Philip Weinstein and Christopher P. Ames

T here are many indications for performing a corpectomy or vertebrectomy in the spinal column, including tumors, trauma, degenerative disease, or deformity. Reconstruction of the vertebral body has ranged from the use of an allograft, to mesh cages, to a tricortical autograft. Use of an autograft remains the gold standard. 4 Harvesting a large piece of tricortical autograft can involve significant morbidity to the patient, and the drawbacks of using allograft bone include longer fusion times, possible immunological rejection by the host, and the extremely

Restricted access

Dean Chou, Phillip B. Storm and James N. Campbell

nerves vulnerable to injury with incision in the region of the iliac crest. The lateral branch of the subcostal nerve is especially vulnerable to injury where the grafts are harvested from the anterior crest. M = muscle; n = nerve. Discussion Obtaining autologous bone grafts from the hip is not without morbidity. Postoperative complications include nerve injury, arterial injury, cosmetic deformity, pelvic instability, abdominal content herniation, and infection. 3, 5, 7, 13, 14 Donor site pain has been noted to occur in 10 to 25% of patients, and the