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  • Author or Editor: Volker Seifert x
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Seba Ramhmdani and Ali Bydon

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Markus Bruder, Adriano Cattani, Florian Gessler, Christian Droste, Matthias Setzer, Volker Seifert and Gerhard Marquardt

OBJECTIVE

Synovial cysts of the spine are rare lesions, predominantly arising in the lumbar region. Despite their generally benign behavior, they can cause severe symptoms due to compression of neural structures in the spinal canal. Treatment strategies are still a matter of discussion. The authors performed a single-center survey and literature search focusing on long-term results after minimally invasive surgery.

METHODS

A total of 141 consecutive patients treated for synovial cysts of the lumbar spine between 1997 and 2014 in the authors’ department were analyzed. Medical reports with regard to signs and symptoms, operative findings, complications, and short-term outcome were reviewed. Assessment of long-term outcome was performed with a standardized telephone questionnaire based on the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Furthermore, patients were questioned about persisting pain, symptoms, and further operative procedures, if any. Subjective satisfaction was classified as excellent, good, fair, or poor based on the Macnab classification.

RESULTS

The approach most often used for synovial cyst treatment was partial hemilaminectomy in 70%; hemilaminectomy was necessary in 27%. At short-term follow-up, the presence of severe and moderate leg pain had decreased from 93% to 5%. The presence of low-back pain decreased from 90% to 5%. Rates of motor and sensory deficits were reduced from 40% to 14% and from 45% to 6%, respectively. The follow-up rate was 58%, and the mean follow-up period was 9.3 years. Both leg pain and low-back pain were still absent in 78%. Outcome based on the Macnab classification was excellent in 80%, good in 14%, fair in 1%, and poor in 5%. According to the ODI, 78% of patients had no or only minimal disability, 16% had moderate disability, and 6% had severe disability at the time of follow-up. In this cohort, 7% needed surgery due to cyst recurrence, and 9% required a delayed stabilization procedure after the initial operation.

CONCLUSIONS

Surgical treatment with resection of the cyst provides favorable results in outcome. Excellent or good outcome persisting for a long-term follow-up period can be achieved in the vast majority of cases. Complication rates are low despite an increased risk of dural injury. With facet-sparing techniques, the stability of the segment can be preserved, and resection of spinal synovial cysts does not necessarily require segmental fusion.

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Sae-Yeon Won, Daniel Dubinski, Markus Bruder, Adriano Cattani, Volker Seifert and Juergen Konczalla

OBJECTIVE

Isolated acute subdural hematoma (aSDH) is increasing in older populations and so is the use of oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT). The dramatic increase of OAT—with direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) as well as with conventional anticoagulants—is leading to changes in the care of patients who present with aSDH while receiving OAT. The purpose of this study was to determine the management and outcome of patients being treated with OAT at the time of aSDH presentation.

METHODS

In this single-center, retrospective study, the authors analyzed 116 consecutive cases involving patients with aSDH treated from January 2007 to June 2016. The following parameters were assessed: patient characteristics, admission status, anticoagulation status, perioperative management, comorbidities, clinical course, and outcome as determined at discharge and through 6 months of follow-up. Oral anticoagulants were classified as thrombocyte inhibitors, vitamin K antagonists, and DOACs. Patients were stratified based on which type of medication they were taking, and subgroup analyses were performed. Predictors of unfavorable outcome at discharge and follow-up were identified.

RESULTS

Of 116 patients, 74 (64%) had been following an OAT regimen at presentation with aSDH. The patients who were taking oral anticoagulants (OAT group) were significantly older (OR 12.5), more often comatose 24 hours postoperatively (OR 2.4), and more often had ≥ 4 comorbidities (OR 3.2) than patients who were not taking oral anticoagulants (no-OAT group). Accordingly, the rate of unfavorable outcome was significantly higher in patients in the OAT group, both at discharge (OR 2.3) and at follow-up (OR 2.2). Of the patients in the OAT group, 37.8% were taking a thrombocyte inhibitor, 54.1% a vitamin K antagonist, and 8.1% DOACs. In all cases, OAT was stopped on discovery of aSDH. For reversal of anticoagulation, patients who were taking a thrombocyte inhibitor received desmopressin 0.4 μg/kg, 1–2 g tranexamic acid, and preoperative transfusion with 2 units of platelets. Patients following other oral anticoagulant regimens received 50 IU/kg of prothrombin complex concentrates and 10 mg of vitamin K. There was no significant difference in the rebleeding rate between the OAT and no-OAT groups. The in-hospital mortality rate was significantly higher for patients who were taking a thrombocyte inhibitor (OR 3.3), whereas patients who were taking a vitamin K antagonist had a significantly higher 6-month mortality rate (OR 2.7). Patients taking DOACs showed a tendency toward unfavorable outcome, with higher mortality rates than patients on conventional OAT or patients in the vitamin K antagonist subgroup. Independent predictors for unfavorable outcome at discharge were comatose status 24 hours after surgery (OR 93.2), rebleeding (OR 9.8), respiratory disease (OR 4.1), and infection (OR 11.1) (Nagelkerke R2 = 0.684). Independent predictors for unfavorable outcome at follow-up were comatose status 24 hours after surgery (OR 12.7), rebleeding (OR 3.1), age ≥ 70 years (OR 3.1), and 6 or more comorbidities (OR 3.1, Nagelkerke R2 = 0.466). OAT itself was not an independent predictor for worse outcome.

CONCLUSIONS

An OAT regimen at the time of presentation with aSDH is associated with increased mortality rates and unfavorable outcome at discharge and follow-up. Thrombocyte inhibitor treatment was associated with increased short-term mortality, whereas vitamin K antagonist treatment was associated with increased long-term mortality. In particular, patients on DOACs were seriously affected, showing more unfavorable outcomes at discharge as well as at follow-up. The suggested medical treatment for aSDH in both OAT and no-OAT patients seems to be effective and reasonable, with comparable rebleeding and favorable outcome rates in the 2 groups. In addition, prior OAT is not a predictor for aSDH outcome.

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Florian Gessler, Markus Bruder, Stephan Duetzmann, Stephanie Tritt, Joshua D. Bernstock, Volker Seifert and Christian Senft

OBJECTIVE

Neurosurgical intervention may increase the risk of developing cerebral vein and dural sinus thrombosis (CVT). The clinical management of CVT in postoperative patients remains unclear. This retrospective study explores the disease occurrence, associated risk factors, and outcomes in patients with tumors who developed CVT after craniotomy.

METHODS

A retrospective analysis and review of patient records in those who had undergone cranial tumor removal within the authors' neurosurgical department was performed. In so doing, the authors identified a cohort of patients who developed CVT postoperatively. The study included patients who presented to the department between January 2004 and December 2013.

RESULTS

Of 2286 patients with intracranial lesions who underwent craniotomy, 35 (1.5%) went on to develop CVT. The authors identified the semisitting position (OR 7.55, 95% CI 3.73–15.31, p < 0.001); intraoperative sinus injury (OR 1.5, 95% CI 3.57–15.76, p < 0.001); and known CVT risk factors (OR 7.77, 95% CI 2.28–21.39, p < 0.001) as predictors of CVT development. Of note, 19 patients (54.3%) had good outcomes (modified Rankin Scale Score 0–1), whereas 9 patients (25.7%) had suffered dependency or death (modified Rankin Scale Score 4–6) at last follow-up. Intracerebral hemorrhage (OR 21.27, 95% CI 1.59–285.01, p = 0.02) and delayed delivery of an intermediate dose of low-molecular-weight heparin anticoagulation (OR 24.12, 95% CI 2.08–280.13, p = 0.01) were associated with unfavorable outcomes.

CONCLUSIONS

Only a minority of patients undergoing craniotomy for tumor removal develop CVT, and the majority of those who do develop CVT recover well. Early administration of an intermediate dose of low-molecular-weight heparin anticoagulation might be considered once CVT is diagnosed.